Cubs

Roger Federer breaks the heart of Great Britain

812482.jpg

Roger Federer breaks the heart of Great Britain

From Comcast SportsNet
WIMBLEDON, England (AP) -- A Grand Slam title drought did indeed end in Sunday's historic and riveting Wimbledon final, only it was Roger Federer's lengthy-for-him gap between trophies that came to a close, rather than Britain's 76-year wait for a homegrown men's champion. Making sure everyone knows he is still as capable as ever of brilliance on a tennis court -- particularly one made of grass, and with a roof overhead -- Federer came back to beat Andy Murray 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 indoors on Centre Court for a record-tying seventh championship at the All England Club. "It feels nice," Federer said, clutching the gold trophy only Pete Sampras has held as many times in the modern era. "It's like it never left me." The victory also increased Federer's record total to 17 major titles after being stuck on No. 16 for 2 years, and clinched a return to the top of the ATP rankings, overtaking Novak Djokovic, after an absence of a little more than two years. Federer's 286th week at No. 1 ties Sampras for the most in history. "He doesn't want to stop now. He knows he's going to continue to play well and try to break seven, and he could very well end up with eight or nine Wimbledons," Sampras said in a telephone interview. "I just think he's that much better than the other guys on grass, and he loves the court the way I loved that court. He's a great champion, a classy champion, and I'm really happy for him." After a record seven consecutive Wimbledon finals from 2003-09, winning the first six, Federer lost in the quarterfinals in 2010 and 2011, then wasted two match points and a two-set lead against Djokovic in the U.S. Open semifinals last year, raising questions about whether he might be slipping. "A couple tough moments for me the last couple years, I guess," Federer said. "So I really almost didn't try to picture myself with the trophy or try to think too far ahead, really." After losing in the semifinals each of the previous three years, Murray was the first British man to reach the final at Wimbledon since Bunny Austin in 1938, and was trying to become the hosts' first male title winner since Fred Perry in 1936. Alas, Murray dropped to 0-4 in Grand Slam finals, three against Federer. Only one other man lost the first four major title matches of his career: Ivan Lendl, who is coaching Murray now and sat in his guest box with chin planted on left palm, as expressionless as he was during his playing career. While Lendl never did win Wimbledon, perhaps Murray can take solace from knowing his coach did end up with eight Grand Slam titles. "I'm getting closer," Murray told the crowd afterward, his voice cracking and tears flowing. "Everybody always talks about the pressure of playing at Wimbledon, how tough it is," he said. "It's not the people watching; they make it so much easier to play. The support has been incredible, so thank you." The Scotland native was urged on by 15,000 or so of his closest friends in person, along with thousands more watching on a large video screen a short walk away across the ground -- not to mention the millions watching the broadcast on the BBC. The afternoon's first roar from those in attendance came when Murray jogged to the baseline for the prematch warmup; there even were cheers when his first practice stroke clipped the top of the net and went over. Any omen would do. The British, tennis enthusiasts and otherwise, searched for signs everywhere. Murray turned 25 in May, just as Perry had turned 25 in May 1934, shortly before he won his first of three consecutive Wimbledon titles; 2012 is Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee, celebrating her 60-year reign, just as 1977, when Virginia Wade won the Wimbledon women's championship, was the Silver Jubilee, marking 25 years on the throne; on Saturday night, Jonathan Marray (paired with Frederik Nielsen of Denmark) became the first Brit to win a men's doubles title at Wimbledon since -- yes, that's right -- 1936. Royalty -- real and of a celebrity nature -- began arriving more than a half-hour beforehand: Prince William's wife, Kate, and her sister, Pippa Middleton; British Prime Minister David Cameron; soccer star David Beckham and his wife, former Spice Girl Victoria. Also present in the Royal Box: Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond, who wants Scotland to break away from Britain. Early on, every point Murray won earned cheers as though the ultimate outcome had been decided. Every miss, even a first-serve fault, drew moans of "Awwwwwww," as though their lad had lost any chance. Murray got off to a glorious start. Federer, appearing in his 24th Grand Slam final, appeared the tenser of the two, amazingly enough, and when he sailed a swinging forehand volley long to get broken in the opening game, spectators rose to their feet and waved their Scottish and Union Jack flags. That said, they do appreciate greatness here, and so Federer's best offerings drew applause, too. There was plenty of clapping and yelling to go around for both men, who produced extremely high-quality play, filled with lengthy exchanges, superb shotmaking and deft volleying -- all befitting the setting and the stakes. Murray's second break helped him take the opening set, and things were even as could be for much of the second, until deuce at 5-5. From there, Federer stepped up, in large part by winning 43 of the 57 points on his serve the rest of the way. He saved all five break points he faced after the first set. After holding for 6-5 in the second, Federer broke. At 30-all, he won a 17-stroke point with a drop volley that Murray got to but sailed a lob attempt long. And then Federer carved -- caressed, really -- another drop volley, this one bouncing to the side after it landed for a winner, impossible to reach, closing a 20-stroke exchange. "Roger did a good job in the second set, turning the momentum around, and really changing things a lot," said his coach, Paul Annacone, who also worked with Sampras. A real key switch happened at 1-all in the third, when a drizzle transformed into heavy showers, causing a 40-minute delay while the retractable cover was moved over the court. The roof was installed before the 2009 tournament; this was its first use for a singles final. Until then, Federer had won 86 points, Murray 85. Under the roof -- with no wind to alter trajectories, allowing the third-seeded Swiss star to make pure, explosive contact with the ball -- Federer won 65 points, Murray 52. "The way the court plays is a bit different," the fourth-seeded Murray said. "I think he served very well when the roof closed. He served better." The most monumental game, though, came with Murray serving and trailing 3-2 in the third. It was chock-full: 10 deuces, six break points for Federer, three falls to the turf by Murray, all spread over roughly 20 gloriously intense minutes. Murray went up 40-love, then began to crack as Federer walloped two backhand returns to 40-30. On the next point, Federer conjured up another beautiful drop shot and Murray tumbled head-over-heels while giving chase; both Federer and the chair umpire went over to check on him. A few points later, Murray did a somersault at the baseline when he slipped going after a lob. And on it went. At the 10th deuce, Federer sent another lob over Murray, who hit the deck yet again, but got up in time to see the ball plop on the baseline. This set up Federer's sixth break point, the last he would need -- in the game and the set, certainly, but also in the match and the tournament, it seemed. He converted it with an inside-out forehand that landed in a corner, and Murray could only push his reply into the net. There would be no more shifts of control, no reasons for Federer to doubt -- or for Murray and his legion of backers to believe. The final break for Federer made it 3-2 in the fourth, when he flicked a cross-court backhand passing winner that was powerful and perfect. Federer made a rare show of strong emotion, shaking his right fist and bellowing. That, essentially, was that, no matter how many times the fans were going to sing their choruses of "An-dy! An-dy!" and "Mur-ray! Mur-ray!" Federer only needed to hold serve three more times, and he did, then crumbled to the court when Murray sailed one last forehand wide. "This is, I guess, how you want to win Wimbledon -- by going after your shots, believing you can do it," Federer said, "and that's what I was able to do today." He most definitely is back to being the best at what he does. Federer turns 31 on Aug. 8, and is the first thirtysomething man to win Wimbledon since Arthur Ashe in 1975. No matter. He and Sampras -- and, by now, plenty of others -- see no reason why Federer can't keep adding to all of his records. "I'm so happy I'm at the age I am right now, because I had such a great run and I know there's still more possible. To enjoy it right now, it's very different than when I was 20 or 25," said Federer, whose twin daughters, wearing matching black-and-white dresses and frilly socks, applauded from his guest box during the trophy ceremony. "I'm at a much more stable place in my life. I wouldn't want anything to change," he added. "So this is very, very special right now."

Changes aren't exactly popular, but Cubs and Sox — except maybe Willson Contreras — will adapt to baseball's new pace-of-play rules

Changes aren't exactly popular, but Cubs and Sox — except maybe Willson Contreras — will adapt to baseball's new pace-of-play rules

MESA, Ariz. — We know Willson Contreras doesn’t like baseball’s new pace-of-play rules.

He isn’t the only one.

“I think it’s a terrible idea. I think it’s all terrible,” Jon Lester said last week at spring training, before the specifics of the new rules were even announced. “The beautiful thing about our sport is there’s no time.”

Big surprise coming from the Cubs’ resident old-schooler.

The new rules limit teams to six mound visits per every nine-inning game, with exceptions for pitching changes, between batters, injuries and after the announcement of a pinch hitter. Teams get an extra mound visit for every extra inning in extra-inning games. Also, commercial breaks between innings have been cut by 20 seconds.

That’s it. But it’s caused a bit of an uproar.

Contreras made headlines Tuesday when he told reporters that he’ll willingly break those rules if he needs to in order to put his team in a better position to win.

“I’ve been reading a lot about this rule, and I don’t really care. If I have to pay the price for my team, I will,” Contreras said. “There’s six mound visits, but what if you have a tight game? … You have to go out there. They cannot say anything about that. It’s my team, and we just care about winning. And if they’re going to fine me about the No. 7 mound visit, I’ll pay the price.”

Talking about pace-of-play rule changes last week, Cubs manager Joe Maddon said his team would adapt to any new rules. In Chicago baseball’s other Arizona camp, a similar tune of adaptation was being sung.

“Obviously as players we’ve got to make adjustments to whatever rules they want to implement,” White Sox pitcher James Shields said. “This is a game of adjustments, we’re going to have to make adjustments as we go. We’re going to have to figure out logistics of the thing, and I would imagine in spring training we’re going to be talking about it more and more as we go so we don’t mess it up.”

There was general consensus that mound visits are a valuable thing. So what happens if a pitcher and catcher need to communicate but are forced to do it from 60 feet, six inches away?

“Sign language,” White Sox catching prospect Zack Collins joked. “I guess you have to just get on the same page in the dugout and hope that nothing goes wrong if you’re out of visits.”

In the end, here’s the question that needs answering: Are baseball games really too long?

On one hand, as Lester argued, you know what you’re signing up for when you watch a baseball game, be it in the stands at a ballpark or on TV. No one should be shocked when a game rolls on for more than three hours.

But shock and fans' levels of commitment or just pure apathy are two different things. And sometimes it’s a tough ask for fans to dedicate four hours of their day 162 times a year. So there’s a very good reason baseball is trying to make the game go faster, to keep people from leaving the stands or flipping the TV to another channel.

Unsurprisingly, Lester would rather keep things the way they are.

“To be honest with you, the fans know what they’re getting themselves into when they go to a game,” Lester said. “It’s going to be a three-hour game. You may have a game that’s two hours, two hours and 15 minutes. Great, awesome. You may have a game that’s four hours. That’s the beautiful part of it.

“I get the mound visit thing. But what people that aren’t in the game don’t understand is that there’s so much technology in the game, there’s so many cameras on the field, that every stadium now has a camera on the catcher’s crotch. So they know signs before you even get there. Now we’ve got Apple Watches, now we’ve got people being accused of sitting in a tunnel (stealing signs). So there’s reasons behind the mound visit. He’s not just coming out there asking what time I’m going to dinner or, ‘Hey, how you feeling?’ There’s reasons behind everything, and I think if you take those away, it takes away the beauty of the baseball game.

“Every game has a flow, and I feel like that’s what makes it special. If you want to go to a timed event, go to a timed event. I’m sorry I’m old-school about it, but baseball’s been played the same way for a long time. And now we’re trying to add time to it. We’re missing something somewhere.”

Whether limiting the number of mound visits creates a significant dent in this problem remains to be seen. But excuse the players if they’re skeptical.

“We’ve got instant replay, we’ve got all kinds of different stuff going on. I don’t think (limiting) the mound visits are going to be the key factor to speeding this game up,” Shields said. “Some pitchers take too long, and some hitters take too long. It’s combination of a bunch of stuff.

“I know they’re trying to speed the game up a little bit. I think overall, the game’s going as fast as it possibly could. You’ve got commercials and things like that. TV has a lot to do with it. There’s a bunch of different combinations of things. But as a player, we’ve got to make an adjustment.”

Nwaba, Felicio, Payne: Getting to know the newest members of the Bulls rotation

thebig3.png
USA TODAY

Nwaba, Felicio, Payne: Getting to know the newest members of the Bulls rotation

The Bulls are moving forward with their youth, as John Paxson announced on Tuesday that David Nwaba, Cristiano Felicio and Cameron Payne will all enter the rotation for the duration of the season.

Call it tanking, call it wanting to get a look at younger players who may or may not be part of the rotation. Whatever the reason, here's what to expect from the three newcomers, what the Bulls are looking for and why it matters moving forward.

David Nwaba

What he's done: We wrote on Nwaba last month after the bulky 6-foot-4 shooting guard did his best to limit Giannis Anteotokounmpo in a loss to the Bucks. He's as unique a shooting guard as you'll find in today's NBA, attempting just 19 3-pointers in nearly 1,000 minutes this season. He's also taken just two 2-point attempts outside of the paint. He's a bully who attacks the basket and takes high-percentage shots, which is why he's not surprising he's shooting 51.7 percent from the field this year. Of course, he's limited offensively. The NBA is finding it hard for 7-footers to make it if they can only shoot at the rim, and Nwaba's a shooting guard...who doesn't shoot.

But he's made his mark defensively, and then some. He's the Bulls' best defender, both via the eye test and statistically. And because of that he also has the team's second best net rating (-0.4), behind only Bobby Portis (-0.2). He can defend three positions, and a fourth in the paint if need be. He's an absolute rock at 220 pounds and moves well for his size. His athleticism is on full display, and he's a high-motor guy every time he steps on the floor. His offensive limitations put a cap on his potential, and he's already 25 years old despite this being just his second NBA season. There's a spot somewhere in the league for Nwaba (see: Allen, Tony playing 14 NBA seasons), but he isn't exactly a perfect fit in Chicago because of his lack of outside shooting. He needs to be paired with floor spacers at all times or the offense will really suffer.

What the Bulls are looking for: Perhaps Nwaba's new role will allow him to have more of a green light on offense. Fred Hoiberg loves the way Nwaba plays his role (he's shooting 26 percent from 3, but on just 19 attempts that hardly matters) and doesn't go outside his comfort zone, but maybe he needs to do just that. Per NBA.com, Nwaba has played 16 minutes at the point (Grant, Dunn, Valentine, Arcidiacano all off the floor), but maybe the Bulls will see if his bully ball driving to the basket can create open looks for shooters. He's not a terribly gifted ball handler, but he's a threat in transition and an apt rebounder to boot.

Above all the Bulls are looking for a few more flashes from Nwaba. He'll be a free agent this summer and might be a part of the Bulls' plans if the market doesn't heat up for him. Again, don't expect a 3-point revelation from him. He is who he is, and that's a 6-foot-4 power forward who plays shooting guard. That has its obvious advantages, but more disadvantages. If he can prove to have a little more offensive flexibility it'd make the Bulls more comfortable about bringing him back in the fold next season. The fact that the Bulls don't have a second-round pick in 2018 helps his cause.

What to expect: More of the same from what we've seen. If it's not yet clear, Nwaba isn't going to become a different player just because he's playing more minutes. His numbers might not change much, either. It will be fun to see how much trust Fred Hoiberg puts in him to guard the opponent's best player, with matchups like Andrew Wiggins, Kemba Walker, Spencer Dinwiddie and Kyrie Irving coming in the next two weeks. He'll be a hounding defender, and he'll have a few 6-for-8 shooting nights. He may even begin shooting more 3-pointers, just to see if he can find a comfort level.

Cristiano Felicio

What he's done: It hasn't been Timofey Mozgov-getting-$64 million bad, but the Bulls have to feel a little buyer's remorse in giving Felicio a four-year, $32 million deal last summer. He showed real potential on offense down the stretch last season, averaging 4.8 points on 64 percent shooting and 4.3 rebounds after the All-Star break. He did his damage in limited minutes (16.0 per game) but appeared to be a solid pick-and-roll option with good hands. He didn't bring much to the table defensively, but you also can't teach 6-foot-10, 270 pounds. And yet, for whatever reason, all that potential has fizzled in 2017-18. Felicio was essentially yanked from the rotation (despite the Bulls not having a true backup to Robin Lopez) and in his limited minutes has been awful. His happy feet from his rookie season have returned, he's out of position more times than not and it's led to copious fouls.

His -23.8 net rating is second worst in the NBA among players averaging 12 minutes per game, behind only Jahlil Okafor. And his 89.9 offensive rating is the worst in the league, not a good sign considering he's known as a better offensive than defensive player. It's been a season to forget, and the Bulls simply have to hope extended playing time improve his confidence, which in turn improves his game.

What the Bulls are looking for: Anything. Without piling too much on him - he's such a friendly dude - the Bulls need to see some of that spark he showed late in each of the last two seasons. Felicio has essentially split his minutes between playing with Jerian Grant (161 minutes) and Kris Dunn, and he's performed much better with Dunn (shocking, we know). That should help, and it'll also be interesting to see how often Hoiberg pairs of Payne and Felicio. Don't laugh, but those two could see a lot of time together next season off the bench. Simply being given a rotation spot isn't going to give Felicio more athleticism or quicker feet, but the Bulls will want to see him grasping concepts, communicating better and defending with his body on that end of the floor. It's a lot to ask, but he's sort of hit rock bottom as a 25-year-old making $8 million a year to rack up DNP-CDs.

What to expect: He will be better playing with Dunn, and playing alongside Markkanen should free up room for him in the paint. He'll likely be the beneficiary of some dump-offs from LaVine and Dunn on drives to the hoop. We'll get the occasional 16-point, 7-rebound night where he puts himself in the right position under the basket and plays well in pick-and-roll. Defensively he's going to continue to rack up fouls, and playing next to Markkanen instead of Bobby Portis probably won't help much. But the Bulls want to see some improvement from here on. If he can transform into a 9-point-per-night scorer who can be relatively hidden defensively, the Bulls will take it. Watch for how he moves his feet on defense, and his hands on offense.

Cameron Payne

What he's done: The centerpiece of last year's Taj Gibson/Doug McDermott deal, Payne really struggled in his limited minutes with the Bulls. Playing behind Rajon Rondo and the 14 other point guard the Bulls had that year, Payne averaged 4.9 points and 1.4 assists in 12.9 minutes. He had 15 assists and 13 turnovers in 142 minutes, while shooting 33 percent from the field. Between OKC and the Bulls, Payne had a 40.7 true shooting percentage, second worst in the NBA among 233 qualified players. His offensive rating among those same players was fourth worst. Simply put, Payne had a 2016-17 to forget...and then he broke his foot. He's set to make his debut on Thursday, taking Jerian Grant's spot in the rotation. Here goes nothing.

What the Bulls are looking for: Payne is a natural score-first point guard, or at least has been in his limited minutes in the league. But the Bulls are going to want to see how he distributes on the second unit, playing alongside wings with range in Denzel Valentine and Paul Zipser. Payne will have his chance to score, and he is a career 38 percent 3-point shooter in limited minutes, so perhaps Hoiberg will draw up some plays to find him open looks. He's got the length to succeed defensively, but thus far his defensive metrics haven't said the same.

What to expect: Payne is different from Nwaba and Felicio in that he's been injured all year. The Bulls are going to need to progress slowly with a foot he's now broken twice. So don't expect the same type of run the other newbies will get in the rotation. But Payne is going to have the green light to shoot (it's when he's at his best) but will also be tasked with finding open shooters. He's not particularly quick with the ball and doesn't create much separation, meaning pick-and-roll/pop opportunities will be where he delivers most. Put simply, he isn't as good as Jerian Grant, and the Bulls will see a decrease in production. But he's only 23 years old and is three years removed from being a Lottery pick. It'd be unfair to dub him a bust, and this is the same Bulls management that really liked Kris Dunn. That's worked out, so maybe they have an eye for point guards.