Cubs

Shaw putting up numbers, but hasn't lost edge

680652.png

Shaw putting up numbers, but hasn't lost edge

Andrew Shaw was getting very creative on his goal scoring lately. Off his shins, off his stick, it didnt matter; Shaw wouldve knocked the puck off any part of him to ensure success.

I dont think Ive scored off my head, Shaw said recently. But Ill work on it.

When Shaw returned for his second stint with the Blackhawks, the coaches told him what they wanted: energy, fire, determination and, if he potted a goal or two, it was a bonus. The good news for Shaw this time around is, hes still putting up numbers and he hasnt lost his edge in the process.

Shaw had a five-game point streak before he was held off the score sheet against New Jersey on Tuesday night. No, Shaw isnt supposed to be a tried-and-true goal scorer. But since he isnt afraid to get to the net and use himself as a human deflector something the Blackhawks havent had enough of these past two seasons and hes getting rewarded for it.

Hes a little guy but hes got a big heart, Marian Hossa said. He leaves everything on the ice. Hes always around the net and good things happen when he goes to those areas. He doesnt mind the dirty work and good things happen for him.

His commitment to that has earned him more ice time and more responsibilities. It also earned him a shootout chance against the venerable Martin Brodeur on Tuesday. Shaw beat the Devils goaltender, but instead hit post. Nevertheless, Shaws obviously earning respect from teammates and coaches.

I just think hes got that ingredient that you like as a competitor. He finds ways to get the job done and welcomes the challenges, coach Joel Quenneville said. Whether you use the term fearless or gutsy, you can add some more terms to that. You appreciate the way he competes for himself and his teammates.

Defenseman Duncan Keith said I think whats underrated with him is his speed. Hes not the smoothest skater but he gets to places and gets to the right areas.

Shaw got a second chance with the Blackhawks and hes taking advantage of it. Hes dealt with the pressure of a late-season playoff push. He got a taste of what the playoffs can be like in a heated game against Vancouver last week. Its heady stuff, and Shaws handled it just fine.

The kids got energy, Corey Crawford said. What can I say? Hes playing hard and has some skill, too. Were definitely glad hes in the lineup.

Willson Contreras willing to pay the price for mound visits

willson.jpg
USA TODAY

Willson Contreras willing to pay the price for mound visits

News broke to Willson Contreras that the league will be limiting mound visits this upcoming season, and the Cubs catcher —notorious for his frequent visits to the rubber — is not having it.

“I’ve been reading a lot about this rule, and I don’t really care. If you have to go again and pay the price for my team, I will," he said.

The new rules rolled out Tuesday will limit six visits —any time a manager, coach or player visits the mound — per nine innings. But, communication between a player and a pitcher that does not require them moving from their position does not count as a visit.When a team is out of visits, it's the umpire's discretion to allow an extra trip to the mound.

But despite the new rules, Contreras is willing to do what's best for the team.

“There’s six mound visits, but what if you have a tight game? They cannot say anything about that. If you’re going to fine me about the [seventh] mound visit, I’ll pay the price.”

Left, right, center: Eloy Jimenez, Luis Robert and Micker Adolfo are dreaming of being the White Sox championship outfield of the future

Left, right, center: Eloy Jimenez, Luis Robert and Micker Adolfo are dreaming of being the White Sox championship outfield of the future

GLENDALE, Ariz. — All that was missing was a dinner bell.

From all over the White Sox spring training complex at Camelback Ranch they came, lined up in front of the third-base dugout and all around the cage to see a trio of future White Sox take batting practice.

This is all it was, batting practice. But everyone wanted to get a glimpse of Eloy Jimenez, Luis Robert and Micker Adolfo swinging the bat. And those three outfield prospects delivered, putting on quite a show and displaying exactly what gets people so darn excited about the White Sox rebuild.

How to sum it up if you weren’t there? Just be happy you weren’t parked behind the left-field fence.

Jimenez and Robert are two of the biggest stars of the White Sox rebuilding effort, with Adolfo flying a bit more under the radar, but all three have big dreams of delivering on the mission general manager Rick Hahn and his front office have undertaken over the past year and change: to turn the South Siders into perennial championship contenders. The offensive capabilities of all three guys have fans and the team alike giddy for the time they hit the big leagues.

And those three guys can’t wait for that day, either.

“Actually, just a few minutes ago when we were taking BP, we were talking about it,” Jimenez said Tuesday. “Micker and Luis said, ‘Can you imagine if we had the opportunity one day to play together in the majors: right, left and center field? The three of us together and having the opportunity to bring a championship to this team?’ I think that’s a dream for us, and we’re trying to work hard for that.”

“We were just talking about how cool it would be to one day all three of us be part of the same outfield,” Adolfo told NBC Sports Chicago. “We were talking about hitting behind each other in the order and just envisioning ourselves winning championships and stuff like that. It’s awesome. I really envision myself in the outfield next to Eloy and Luis Robert.”

How those three would eventually line up in the outfield at Guaranteed Rate Field remains to be seen. Adolfo’s highly touted arm would make him an attractive option in right field. Robert’s speed and range makes him the logical fit in center field. Jimenez will play whichever position allows his big bat to stay in the lineup every day.

Here in Arizona, the focus isn’t necessarily on some far off future but on the present. As intriguing as all three guys are and as anticipated their mere batting practice sessions seem to be, they all potentially have a long way to go to crack the big league roster. Jimenez is the furthest along, but even he has only 73 plate appearances above the Class A level. Adolfo spent his first full season above rookie ball last year. Robert has yet to play a minor league game in the United States.

The group could very well make its way through the minor leagues together, which would obviously be beneficial come the time when the three arrive on the South Side.

“We were talking about (playing in the big leagues), but also we were talking about just to have the first stage of the three of us together in the minor leagues first and then go to the majors all three of us together,” Robert said. “To have the opportunity to play there should be pretty special for us. We were dreaming about that.”

For months now, and likely for months moving forward, the question has been and will be: when?

Whether it’s Jimenez or top pitching prospect Michael Kopech or any other of the large number of prospects who have become household names, fans and observers are dying to see the stars of this rebuilding project hit the major leagues. Yoan Moncada, Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez made their respective jumps last season. Hahn, who has said repeatedly this offseason that the front office needs to practice patience as much as the fan base, has also mentioned that a good developmental season for these guys might involve no big league appearances at all.

And it’s worth remembering that could be the case considering the lack of experience at the upper levels of the minor leagues for all three of these guys.

“In my mind, I don’t try to set a date for when I'm going to be in the majors,” Jimenez said. “That is something I can’t control. I always talk with my dad and we share opinions, and he says, ‘You know what? Just control the things that you can control. Work hard and do the things that you need to do to get better.’ And that’s my key. That’s probably why I stay patient.”

But staying patient is sometimes easier said than done. The big crowd watching Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo send baseballs into a to-this-point-in-camp rare cloudless Arizona sky proved that.

Dreaming of the future has now become the official pastime of the South Side. And that applies to fans and players all the same.

“I’m very, very excited,” Jimenez said, “because I know from the time we have here, that when the moment comes, when we can all be in the majors, the ones that can finally reach that level, we’re going to be good, we’re going to be terrific. I know that.”