Detroit Tigers

Justin Wilson running out of time to become X-factor for Cubs playoff bullpen

Justin Wilson running out of time to become X-factor for Cubs playoff bullpen

ST. LOUIS – “It’s a big boys’ game,” Joe Maddon said late Tuesday night after taking the ball away from Justin Wilson in the middle of an at-bat, another alarming sign that the lefty reliever will be outside the manager’s circle of trust, assuming the Cubs put him on the playoff roster.

The Cubs acquired Wilson and catcher Alex Avila before the July 31 trade deadline in a package deal with the Detroit Tigers that was supposed to strengthen the bullpen for a World Series title defense. It would give Maddon another late-game option after he took so much heat for the way he used one All-Star closer last year (Aroldis Chapman) and tried to preserve another (Wade Davis) this season.

Except Wilson has looked nothing like the guy who thrived in the American League East with the 2015 New York Yankees (5-0, 3.10 ERA in 74 appearances) and saved 13 games for the Tigers this year.

Maddon had a quick hook once the Cubs exploded for four runs in the eighth inning at Busch Stadium, turning an 8-3 blowout into a one-run game against the St. Louis Cardinals. With the magic number to celebrate a National League Central title down to one, Maddon watched Wilson walk Carson Kelly on five pitches and fall into a 2-0 count against Harrison Bader before summoning Carl Edwards Jr.

“Last night was just not the time to permit it to work itself out,” Maddon said Wednesday. “I thought the way we had come back in that game, to not give ourselves a chance would have been inappropriate, because I don’t like to use C.J. in that situation. But I thought we had a shot.

“I told him right afterwards, I said: ‘Man, you’re going to be right back out there.’ He started out well, the first-pitch strike, beautiful delivery, and then all of a sudden started pulling a couple pitches. I know they’ve done some nice things with his delivery. And I still believe that it’s going to work. But for last night, I could not be overly patient.”

Wilson confirmed what pitching coach Chris Bosio told WSCR-AM 670, the team’s flagship radio station, that he woke up with a “stiff neck” the other day: “A little annoying, but nothing I can’t deal with.”

What do you need to see from Wilson before the regular season ends on Sunday at Wrigley Field and the Cubs ramp up playoff preparations for the Washington Nationals?

“Just to throw consistent strikes,” Maddon said. “It’s not (that) every pitch is going to be a strike, but if he misses a little bit wide with one or two that he can come back into the zone and make his own adjustments.”

Only three days earlier, Maddon talked up Wilson as a potential game-changer after watching him get four outs against the top of the Milwaukee Brewers’ lineup at Miller Park, unleashing 17 fastballs in a row clocked at 95-97 mph.

But it’s hard to see Maddon giving Wilson the ball to face Bryce Harper or Daniel Murphy when his trend line looks like this as a Cub: 18 walks, 17 hits, 11 runs in 15.2 innings.

“Today is a new day,” Wilson said as a pack of reporters swarmed his locker inside the visiting clubhouse. “I go back out there and do what I do.”

Wade Davis is the big-game hunter Cubs need now - and maybe in the future

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USA TODAY

Wade Davis is the big-game hunter Cubs need now - and maybe in the future

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – The origin story of Wade Davis transforming into a dominant closer goes back several years ago and involves a black bear on Canadian hunting grounds about 90 minutes outside of Toronto.

This is the rare animal that didn’t make the video tribute the Tampa Bay Rays cut for Cubs manager Joe Maddon when their ex-zookeeper returned this week to Tropicana Field. But if Davis could stay cool facing a 300-something-pound beast, Maddon reasoned, then a late-inning jam shouldn’t seem so daunting.

“You don’t get much reaction from Wade,” Dave Martinez, Maddon’s longtime bench coach, said on the Cubs Talk podcast. “What you see is what you get. I (asked): ‘Hey, I got a place to go bear hunting, you guys want to go?’

“If you can imagine (Wade) and Jeff Niemann — Jeff Niemann’s 6-10 — they sat up in a tree stand. They saw a black bear come out and he shot it. I wish we had the video. The video’s floating around somewhere.

“We were just talking about it the other day. (Former Rays travel director) Jeff Ziegler went with us, too, and he never did get his bear rug. And he got a little bent out of shape about it.”

Martinez doesn’t know where that trophy wound up. But Davis remains the big-game hunter the Cubs need now — and maybe for the future.

“I’m not thinking past the next two weeks, honestly,” team president Theo Epstein said. “It’s bad form to be talking about offseason stuff at this time of the year.

“He’s had a great year. He’s been perfect in save situations. He’s been a leader out there. Any team would love to have him. But we’re not into the winter yet.”

Are the Cubs willing to pay the price for an All-Star, World-Series-tested closer? Can they afford not to?

Epstein’s front office has been philosophically opposed to making long-term investments in closers. But the Cubs are running out of young hitters to trade for short-term fixes, shipping an elite prospect (Gleyber Torres) to the New York Yankees in last summer’s blockbuster Aroldis Chapman deal and getting Davis by moving a diminishing asset (Jorge Soler) to the Kansas City Royals in a winter-meetings swap.

The Cubs also haven’t seen that alternative ninth-inning solution organically develop this season. It’s hard to picture the Cubs just handing Carl Edwards Jr. the closer’s job heading into his second full season in the big leagues. Pedro Strop also looks more like a very good setup guy than a first-choice candidate to be the 2018 closer.

Justin Wilson (5.79 ERA) hasn’t distinguished himself since coming over from the Detroit Tigers at the July 31 trade deadline, the Cubs now using the lefty reliever in low-leverage/mop-up situations to help restore his game. Hector Rondon — who has 77 saves in a Cubs uniform and a checkered medical history — is dealing with right elbow inflammation.

All those moving pieces make Davis (32-for-32 in save chances) an anchor heading into the four-game showdown against the Milwaukee Brewers that begins Thursday night at Miller Park, where Jake Arrieta will be making his first start since straining his right hamstring on Labor Day and limited to 75-80 pitches.

The Cubs have a 3.5-game lead on a Brewers team that hasn’t gone away yet and a single-digit magic number (eight) to clinch the National League Central. Maddon has already signaled that he will deploy Davis for multiple innings when necessary.

“It’s a good feeling to know that he can do it,” Martinez said. “But all in all, you still have to have these other guys contribute, which they have, and get all the bullpen onboard.

“Now each moment is critical and moving forward they’re going to be put in some pretty tough situations. Each one of them has to step up and do their jobs.

“Do we count on Wade? Absolutely. But we also count on these other guys to go out there and perform.”

During the All-Star festivities in Miami, Davis said “some of that seems unrealistic” when asked about the massive free-agent contracts the Yankees and Los Angeles Dodgers gave Chapman (five years, $86 million) and Kenley Jansen (five years, $80 million) last winter.

But this October will be another huge platform for Davis, who said it already felt like that all season at Wrigley Field.

“Every game, there’s always a constant buzz here,” Davis said. “They’re into it. They’re getting loud. It’s a great atmosphere all year long.”

The White Sox avoided being no-hit in the ninth inning again

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The White Sox avoided being no-hit in the ninth inning again

The White Sox have no intention of being no-hit this season. They just so happen to wait until the ninth inning to show it.

For the second time this season, in Sunday's 12-0 loss to the Tigers, Rick Renteria's group was no-hit through eight innings. And for the second time they avoided becoming the second team to be no-hit this season with a hit in their final frame.

Tim Anderson delivered a double to the right-center gap with no outs in the ninth inning to break up Matt Boyd's chance at history. Boyd had retired 26 White Sox batters to that point, with a Rob Brantly walk in the third inning their only base runner.

On July 9 the White Sox had been no-hit through eight innings in Colorado, and rookie starter Kyle Freeland retired the first batter he faced in the ninth. But a Melky Cabrera single to left broke up that almost-no-no.

The Sox still haven't been no-hit since May 3, 2011, when Francisco Liriano did at U.S. Cellular Field.

Ricky's boys truly don't quit.