Hall of Fame

Brian Urlacher considering 3 Bears coaches if he needs presenter for HOF induction

Brian Urlacher considering 3 Bears coaches if he needs presenter for HOF induction

Brian Urlacher dealt with no shortage of difficult decisions in his distinguished 13-year Bears career. Not many caused him as much difficulty as the one that would confront him if he is voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday.

The “crisis” call: Who would present Urlacher for induction into the Hall of Fame?

Maybe it’s bad luck to think that far ahead, but maybe it’s also natural. In any case, Urlacher is torn between three possibilities (“I only get to have one?” he said, laughing, but not completely):

Lovie Smith — Bears coach from 2004-2012

Bob Babich — Linebackers coach under Smith as well as — at times — defensive coordinator and assistant head coach from 2004-2012

Greg Blache — Dick Jauron’s defensive coordinator from 1999-2003, who moved Urlacher to middle linebacker.

“Those three are the ones who had the biggest impact on my career,” Urlacher said.

And no sooner had he mentioned those three favorites than another — Rod Marinelli, Bears defensive coordinator for Urlacher’s final three seasons — came to mind as Urlacher recalled those who helped him become what he became.

“I thought I could do anything for him,” Urlacher said, then reflected. “We had a lot of players who overshot their abilities because of those coaches.”

Smith was the architect of the Tampa-2 defensive scheme that changed/”downsized” the protective four-man wall in front of Urlacher but also expanded his areas of responsibility and his opportunities for impact. Urlacher had six interceptions and 19 passes defensed in his first four seasons. From 2004-08, with seven games missed in ’04 with hamstring injuries, he grabbed 11 interceptions and broke up 43 passes.

“Lovie let me be an athlete,” Urlacher said, “let me play football.”

Blache brought Urlacher through the early years, while Babich — “Bullet Bob” to his players — combined with Smith to unleash Urlacher to another level.

“Bob is like my dad,” Urlacher said. “I talk to him all the time. Playing football for him, I could do anything — well, almost anything — I wanted to, and he wasn’t going to get mad at me. And he’d listen to me. So would Lovie. And I appreciated that. Same with Rod Marinelli.”

Bears coaches have been scarce among HOF presenters for recent Bears inductees:

HOF inductee          Presented by

Dan Hampton           Ed O’Bradovich, former Bear

Richard Dent             Joe Gilliam, Dent’s Tennessee State coach

Mike Singletary         Kim Singletary (wife)

Jim Finks                   Ed McCaskey

Walter Payton           Jarrett Payton (son)

Stan Jones                Bob Kilculen, former Bear

Mike Ditka                 Ed O’Bradovich, former Bears teammate

For one writer, Hall of Fame semifinalist selection of Brian Urlacher closes a career circle


For one writer, Hall of Fame semifinalist selection of Brian Urlacher closes a career circle

The news on Tuesday wasn’t really any sort of surprise: Brian Urlacher being selected as a semifinalist for the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. Some of the immediate thoughts were, however, for one writer who covered Brian from the day he was drafted on through the unpleasant end of his 13-year career as a Bear.

Good thoughts, though. Definitely good.

The first was a flashback, to a Tuesday in late August 2000 when the ninth-overall pick of the draft, who’d been anointed the starting strong-side linebacker by coach Dick Jauron on draft day, was benched.

It happened up at Halas Hall when Urlacher all of a sudden wasn’t running with the 1’s. Rosie Colvin was in Urlacher’s spot with the starters and would be for a few games into the 2000 season. I caught up with Brian before he walked, in a daze, into Halas Hall after practice and asked about what I’d just seen.

"I'm unhappy with the way I'm playing and I'm sure they are, too," Urlacher said. "I don't think I've been playing very well so that's probably the cause for it right there. I just don't have any technique. I need to work on my technique, hands and feet mostly. I've got to get those down, figure out what I'm doing. I know the defense pretty good now, just don't know how to use my hands and feet."

Urlacher, an All-American safety at New Mexico but MVP of the Senior Bowl in his first game at middle linebacker, had been starting at strong side, over the tight end, because coaches considered it a simpler position for Urlacher to master. But he was not always correctly aligned before the snap, did not use his hands against blockers effectively and occasionally led with his head on tackles. His benching cost him the chance to be the first Bears rookie linebacker since Dick Butkus to start an Opening Day.

It also was the first time in his football life that Urlacher could remember being demoted.

"It's not a good feeling," he said. "I definitely don't like getting demoted but I know why I am. I just have to get better."

Coaches understood what they were really attempting, subsequently acknowledged privately that the SLB experiment was a mistake. While the strong-side slot may have been simpler than the other two principally because of coverage duties, "we're trying to force-feed the kid an elephant," then-defensive coordinator Greg Blache said.

"So you see him gag and what do you do? You give him the Heimlich maneuver, you take some of it out of his mouth, try to chop it up into smaller pieces. He's going to devour it and be a great football player. But he wouldn't be if we choked him to death."

Urlacher didn’t choke and eventually became the starter, not outside, but at middle linebacker when Barry Minter was injured week two at Tampa Bay.

We sometimes don’t fully know the import or significance at the time we’re witnessing something. Urlacher stepping in at middle linebacker was not one of those times – you knew, watching him pick up four tackles in basically just the fourth quarter of a 41-0 blowout by the Bucs.

That was the beginning. Over the years came moments like Urlacher scooping up a Michael Vick fumble in the 2001 Atlanta game and going 90 yards with Vick giving chase but not catching him. Lots of those kinds of moments.

And then cutting to the ending, in 2013, when he and the organization came to an acrimonious parting after GM Phil Emery managed to alienate the face of the franchise both with the one-year contract offer and the way it was handled. Butkus had a nasty separation at the end of his Bears years, too, and Bill George finished his career as a Los Angeles Ram after creating the middle linebacker position as a Bear. Maybe that’s just how Bears and some of their linebackers wind up their relationships.

In any case, while there is no cheering in the pressbox, the hope here is that Brian goes into the Hall in a class with Ray Lewis in their first years of eligibility. Somehow that just seems like it all should close out for that confused kid from New Mexico who lost his first job out of college, but responded to that by becoming one of the all-time greats in his sport.

Brian Urlacher named semifinalist for Hall of Fame


Brian Urlacher named semifinalist for Hall of Fame

In his first year as an eligible candidate, Brian Urlacher was named as one of the 27 semifinalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  

The announcement doesn't come as much of a surprise considering the brilliant career the legendary Bears linebacker had. In 13 seasons with Da Bears, Urlacher proved how valuable he was against both the run and pass, tallying 22 interceptions, 41.5 sacks and 1,040 tackles.

In other words, yeah, he's a worthy first-ballot inductee. 

As the captain of those tremendous Bears defenses in the 2000s, Urlacher made the Pro Bowl eight times, All-Pro teams five times and was honored as Defensive Player of the Year in 2005. And despite falling just short of capturing the team's first Super Bowl since 1985, the Bears were usually competitive even with consistent offensive woes and a revolving door for quarterbacks. 

There are a few more hurdles to clear before No. 54 dons a Hall of Fame jacket, though. The list of 27 gets cut to 15 before voters make their final decisions as to who ultimately gets the call to Canton, Ohio, and there are several other deserving players. Ray Lewis, Randy Moss, Ronde Barber and Terrell Owens are just some of the other headliners in the Class of 2018: 

The Bears will soon have their first Hall of Famer since Richard Dent, who received the nod in 2011. The only question now is whether the voters make Urlacher wait a year.