Bulls

Word on the Street: Pacers' O'Brien canned

Word on the Street: Pacers' O'Brien canned

Friday, Jan. 28, 2011
CSNChicago.com

Pacers' O'Brien canned

Indiana Pacers head coach Jim O'Brien was fired early Sunday afternoon, just hours after his team lost 110-89 to the Bulls at the United Center Saturday night. O'Brien was ejected in the fourth quarter of that game.

The veteran coach had spent the previous three-and-a-half years with the Pacers and posted a record of 121-169. Assistant Frank Vogel will step in as the team's interm head coach until a full-time replacement is found. (Indy Star)

Jordan to be voted into High School Hall of Fame

Michael Jordan, the all-time great Bulls player, will be voted into the Hall of Fame at his old school, Laney High School, where his career first started. The induction ceremony will be on Feb. 4, but no word yet on whether Jordan will attend or not. (Chicago Tribune)

Roenick has more strong words for Cutler

Jeremy Roenick had choice words for Bears quarterback Jay Cutler after the NFC Championship game, taking to his Twitter account. But today on "The Dan Patrick Show" on Comcast SportsNet, Roenick weighed in with his opinion without being confined to a mere 140 characters.

"It would take way more than it took Cutler to get out of that game. It really disappointed me..." Roenick said.

The former Blackhawks center called in to the show to talk about the NHL All-Star Game and Cutler's performance on Sunday. (CSNChicago.com)
Rose to debut two sets of kicks in All-Star Game

Derrick Rose will be showing off more than just his talent at the NBA All-Star Game. He'll be putting his yellow adidas adiZero Rose signature shoe on display in the first half, then debuting the adidas adiZero Rose 1.5, his second version of his signature shoe, in the second.

The adiZero Rose 1.5 is lighter and more supportive than its predecessor. Plus, the shoe's three-paneled SPRINTSKIN zones represent each of Derrick's brothers who helped support him through his journey to the NBA.

The adiZero Rose 1.5 will be available at Foot Locker for 100 in mid-February. (Dime Magazine)
FBI on hand to find missing Cup clinching puck

Despite a 50,000 reward that is being offered by Grant DePorter and Harry Caray's Restaurant, the puck with which Patrick Kane scored the Stanley Cup clinching goal is still missing. DePorter received a puck from a seller in Philadelphia who claimed it was the Cup winner.

But with the help of the FBI, the puck was deemed an impostor. Using high-def, unedited footage from NBC New York, the Chicago offices of the FBI were able to zoom in on the puck and prove that is was not the actual one used in the game.

The FBI staff reportedly donated their time to solve the mystery. (ChicagoBreakingSports)

Lysacek ranked among Business Week's 'Power 100'

Naperville native and Olympic figure skating champion Evan Lysacek earned a place in Business Week magazine's "2011 Power 100." The list ranks America's sports figures based on achievements on and off the field.

He took the No. 82 after being un-ranked a year ago. According to the magazine, Lysacek earns around 2.5 million a year.

The magazine's No. 1 athlete for 2011 is Colts' quarterback Peyton Manning, who replaced Tiger Woods.

Derrick Rose dropped from last year's position as No. 83 to just barely making the cut this year at No. 99. (BusinessWeek)

Robin Lopez taking demotion in stride, wants to return to Chicago

robin_lopez.jpg
USA TODAY

Robin Lopez taking demotion in stride, wants to return to Chicago

Only an errant punch that missed the face of Serge Ibaka prevented Robin Lopez from suiting up for the Bulls since arriving in the summer of 2016, but his availability streak will come to an abrupt end as the Bulls are sitting and Justin Holiday for the foreseeable future.

Lopez didn’t dress for the Bulls’ game against the 76ers, as he and Holiday were replaced by Cristiano Felicio and David Nwaba. Although he was jovial, cracking a few jokes when meeting with the media in pregame, it was clear he was disappointed.

“It was rough for me. I get it. I understand it,” Lopez said. “I always want to be out there playing on the court. That’s what I enjoy, especially playing with these guys. But I’m excited to watch these guys give it a go from the bench.”

With the Bulls being eighth in the lottery standings, Lopez understands the long-term objectives of the organization and said the conversation with the front office went as expected.

“I think pretty much what everybody else has heard,” Lopez said. “I was pulled aside. They told me they wanted to evaluate a few other guys, a few of the young guys. So I get it.”

Starting 138 of 139 games makes his streak ending a bit tougher to stomach, especially considering he didn’t find out about his certain inactivity until right before leaving for the United Center.

“I suppose that’s a little selfish of me, but a little bit,” said Lopez of sadness concerning the streak. “I looked in my closet today and thought I would have a glut of jackets. And I only found two. I didn’t realize this was an issue until about 5 minutes before I had to leave. So I got kind of a ragtag outfit for tonight but hopefully I’ll be better prepared in the games to come.”

Not only will he be armed with better wardrobe but he’ll be bringing a positive disposition to the sidelines that made him loved amongst his teammates.

“All my teammates, whether they’ve been playing with me or sitting on the bench and not dressing, they’ve all supported me,” Lopez said. “I don’t think I’d be too good a person if I didn’t do at least the bare minimum of the same.”

Lopez represented stability and veteran leadership in a tumultuous season, a solid performer when losing was the early norm and upheaval has been constant. It was a reason the Bulls hoped he would garner some interest in the trade market but after hitting for a draft pick in the Nikola Mirotic deal, they had no such luck with Lopez.

Naturally, he was asked about the prospect of being traded over sitting as a healthy scratch.

“That’s hard for me to talk about because I don’t know what situation I could have potentially been in once I had been traded,” Lopez said. “Yeah, it’s … I want to be playing obviously, but we’ve got a great group of guys right here.”

Considering how uncertain things will be for the future, it isn’t a guarantee Lopez won’t be around for the 2018-19 season.

“Yeah. It seems like they still like me. How could they not?,” he joked.

He’s due $14.3 million next season, the last of a four-year deal he signed with the Knicks in 2015. Averaging 12.3 points and shooting 53 percent from the field, he’s productive and valuable on the floor. He’s easy to dismiss with the hoopla surrounding the youth on the roster and the way things clicked when Mirotic stepped on the floor, but seven footers like Lopez aren’t easy to find—even as the game changes.

“I’m a team player. I like to think my play is tied to how the team plays,” Lopez said. “I think we had some really great stretches. The young guys really developed and found a rhythm once we all got healthy. I think we played pretty well.”

With 25 games remaining, he’s unsure of how long his inactivity will last but it’s hard to see him missing the remainder of the season. It would be a bad look for the Bulls and the league to have a healthy player miss two whole months, and Lopez claims no knowledge about that ugly “T” word.

“I’m not familiar with military artillery,” he said.

At least he’s keeping his sense of humor.

Lucas Giolito relieved to be able to shed No. 1 pitching prospect label

Lucas Giolito relieved to be able to shed No. 1 pitching prospect label

GLENDALE, AZ — You don’t need a scale to see that Lucas Giolito lost some weight in the offseason. As he walks around Camelback Ranch, he just seems lighter. These pounds were shedded thanks to a certain label that has been detached from his name and his being.

“Lucas Giolito, number-one pitching prospect in baseball” is no more.

“Definitely. Big time relief. I carried that title for a while,” Giolito told NBC Sports Chicago. “It was kind of up and down. I was (ranked) 1 at one point. I dropped. I always paid attention to it a little bit moving through the minor leagues.”

Which for any young hurler is risky business. The “best pitching prospect” designation can mess with a pitcher’s psyche and derail a promising career. Giolito was walking a mental tightrope reading those rankings, but after making it back to the majors last season with the White Sox and succeeding, the moniker that seemed to follow him wherever he went has now vanished.

“Looking back on it, that stuff is pretty cool," Giolito said. "It can pump you up and make you feel good about yourself, but in the end the question is, what are you going to do at the big league level? Can you contribute to a team? I’m glad that I finally have the opportunity to do that and all that other stuff is in the rear view."

This wasn’t the case when the White Sox acquired Giolito from the Washington Nationals in the Adam Eaton trade in December 2016. When he arrived at spring training last year, he was carrying around tons of extra baggage in his brain that was weighing him down. Questions about his ability and makeup weren’t helping as he tried living up to such high expectations.

“Yeah, I’d say especially with the trade coming off 2016 where I didn’t perform well at all that year," Giolito said. "I got traded over to a new organization, I still have this label on me of being a top pitching prospect while I’m going to a new place, I’m trying to impress people but at the same time I had a lot of things off mechanically I was trying to fix. Mentally, I was not in the best place as far as pitching went. It definitely added some extra pressure that I didn’t deal with well for a while."

How bad was it for Giolito? Here are some of the thoughts that were scrambling his brain during spring training and beyond last season.

“I saw I wasn’t throwing as hard. I was like, ’Where did my velocity go?’ Oh, it’s my mechanics. My mechanics are bad. I need to fix those,” Giolito said. “Then I’m trying to make adjustments. Why can’t I make this adjustment? It compounds. It just builds and builds and builds and can weigh on you a ton. I was 22 turning 23 later in the year. I didn’t handle it very well. I put a lot of pressure on myself to fix all these different things about my performance, my pitching and trying to do it all in one go instead of just relaxing and remembering, ‘Hey, what am I here for? Why do I play the game?’”

Still, pitching coach Don Cooper wanted to see what he had in his young prospect. So last February, he scheduled him to make his White Sox debut against the Cubs in front of a packed house in Mesa.

“It was kind of like a challenge," Giolito said. "They fill the stadium over there. I’m like, ‘Alright here we go."

Giolito gave up one run, three hits, walked one and struck out two in two innings against the Cubs that day.

“I pitched OK," he said. "I think I gave up a home run to Addison Russell. At the same time, I remember that game like I was forcing things. I might have pitched okay, but I was forcing the ball over the plate instead of relaxing, trusting and letting it happen which is kind of my mantra now. I’m saying that all the time, just having confidence in yourself and letting it go.”

A conversation in midseason with Charlotte Knights pitching coach Steve McCatty, suggested by Cooper, helped turn Giolito’s season around. The lesson for Giolito: whatever you have on the day you take the mound is what you have. Don’t force what isn’t there.

Fortunately for Giolito he has extra pitches in his arsenal, so if the curveball isn’t working (which it rarely did when he came up to the majors last season) he can go to his change-up, fastball, slider, etc.

It’s all part of the learning process, both on the mound and off it. Setbacks are coming. Giolito has already had his share. More will be on the way.

“You want to set expectations for yourself. You want to try and achieve great goals,” he said. “At the same time, it is a game of failure. There’s so much that you have to learn through experience whether that be success or failure. Especially going through the minor leagues. There’s so much that you have to learn and a lot of it is about development. It’s a crazy ride for sure.”