NFL playoffs aren't the time to get fancy - NBC Sports

NFL playoffs aren't the time to get fancy
A breakdown of key plays divisional teams will rely on this weekend
AP
When Atlanta receiverÿRoddy White connects with quarterback Matt Ryan, you know the Falcons are doing exactly what they want, writes MNike Tanier.
January 13, 2011, 7:01 pm

It's diagram time again! This week, we'll break down some signature plays of the eight remaining playoff teams, including plays that helped teams through last week's wild-card weekend.

All plays are taken from game tape of the 2010 season.

ATLANTA FALCONS
The Falcons do not try to outsmart anyone on offense. Their gameplans are simple and a little predictable - funnel the ball into the hands of their best playmakers, most notably receiver Roddy White.

Coordinator Mike Mularkey can afford to run a no-frills offense because he knows Matt Ryan can deliver pinpoint passes and White will haul in even the toughest catches.

/

But let's face it: White is the only player Ryan wants to throw to on 3rd-and-long, and everyone knows it.

So how does White get open? As shown, the defense has three safeties deep; no one should be open 20 yards down the field. The blue double line shows Ryan's eyes. He stares down the middle safety, never looking White's way until the last second. White doesn't tip his route; the defense doesn't know whether he will cut inside, outside, or run straight up the field until he makes his sharp break for the corner.

The deep corner pass is incredibly difficult to execute - only a handful of NFL quarterbacks have the arm strength and accuracy to fire a pass into such a tight space so far down the field. Ryan's eyes, White's route, and the difficulty of the throw all force the safety to stay deep. He must worry about a go-route or post first, a hard-to-execute corner route second. Ryan fires a laser that only White can get to. The pass comes in a little low, but White dives, scoops up the ball, and keeps his body inbounds.

The Falcons' simple system is hard to stop because the team is fundamentally sound. They block and tackle well, run routes properly, and always execute their assignments. The Packers like to be exotic and creative on defense; the Falcons' no-nonsense approach on offense provides the perfect counterattack.

GREEN BAY PACKERS
The Packers had difficulty establishing the run after Ryan Grant got injured. Grant was their only fast running back, so the Packers were forced to resort to cloud-of-dust rushing tactics that didn't always complement the team's wide-open passing attack.

Against the Eagles on Sunday, the Packers were able to grind out rushing yardage using a wrinkle they have tinkered with for years: the full house backfield featuring two fullbacks and a power-running halfback.

/

At the snap, Rodgers pivots left, Starks jab-steps left, and the offensive line opens up to the left side. This gets the defense flowing in that direction. Kuhn and Johnson head straight for the outside linebackers, and each lays down a solid block. The center and right guard double-team the nose tackle, pushing him to their left and opening a large cutback lane for Starks. Starks obeys an age-old coaching point by "hugging the double team," and uses the tandem block as a wall to cut to his right and go upfield. Only the middle linebacker has a chance to stop Starks, but he flowed to his left, got caught behind the double team, and can only muster a feeble attempt at an arm tackle. Starks plows downfield for 27 yards.

Slideshow
Image: Matt Forte

Chicago's Matt Forte is one of 10 players who will be key to their team's success.

CONTINUED
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next >
< Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next >

Chicago Bears
Offensive coordinator Mike Martz is the guru of the double move. His teams may have trouble running the ball or protecting the quarterback, but his receivers are masters of the art of selling one route, then breaking off into another when a defender is faked out of position. Double moves were a staple of Martz's Greatest Show on Turf offenses in St. Louis, and he has taught Chicago's stable of speedy receivers how to shake defenders for big gains on deep patterns.

/

Knox runs what appears to be a post pattern, cutting toward the middle of the field at 12 yards. His defender overreacts to the cut, moving in front of Knox to take away Cutler's passing lane. As soon as the defender commits, Knox smoothly breaks off and turns toward the sideline. Cutler may be mistake-prone, but he has excellent arm strength, and he delivers the deep-out pass so quickly that Knox can turn up field and race along the sideline until the free safety drags him down for a 67-yard gain.

Devin Hester (23) can also execute deep double-moves, and underneath receivers like Forte and Olsen have the hands and quickness to keep the defense honest. When Cutler is spreading the ball evenly among his targets and his offensive line is giving him time to throw, the Bears have a dangerous, unpredictable offense.

Seattle Seahawks
I'll admit it: I wrote off Matt Hasselbeck before the Seahawks upset the Saints on Saturday. He suffered so many injuries this season that it was easy to write him off as a non-factor. Hasselbeck certainly is brittle, but he's also a playoff tested veteran who has always excelled at the little things: finding secondary receivers, play-action passing, and picking zone coverage apart. And let's not forget pump-faking. Hasselbeck used a brilliant pump-fake last week to punish an overeager Saints defender.

/

But Morrah isn't running a curl. The red double line shows Hasselbeck's pump fake, which coaxes the safety to jump the route. Morrah is more nimble than he looks, and he quickly twists off the curl route and runs upfield. Hasselbeck's experience and touch now take over. He doesn't wait for Morrah to complete his route; he just floats a soft pass to the spot on the field where Morrah will eventually wind up. With both a tight end and running back helping in pass protection, this play is designed to give Hasselbeck maximum time to wait, pump, then float his pass.

Slideshow
Image: Matt Forte

Chicago's Matt Forte is one of 10 players who will be key to their team's success.

< Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next >

New England Patriots

Wes Welker remains the heart and soul of the Patriots offense. Tom Brady distributes the ball to a dozen different targets, and the power running game has reemerged after a few years of spread-offense fascination, but when the Patriots want 8-to-10 reliable yards, Brady looks to Welker. While Welker is famous for catching quick screens, this season he has been running more traditional routes, and the Patriots have had to scheme to isolate Welker now that Randy Moss isn't around to occupy the opponent's attention.

/

The Branch-Welker route combination is designed to keep the cornerback and safety on their heels. Notice that the two receivers are almost stacked at the line of scrimmage. Welker releases inside, so he is running behind Branch for a few steps, and Branch veers across the face of the linebacker, who freezes while figuring out who is going where. When defenders face stacked receivers, they often assign coverage based on the patterns; the cornerback is not covering Branch or Welker, but whoever cuts to the outside. Both Welker and Branch run crossing routes, and while the linebacker does a good job of diagnosing the play and chasing Welker, he's not fast enough to stay with the receiver, who gains 15 yards.

The Jets want to play man-to-man coverage so they can unleash their blitzes, but Brady excels at finding and exploiting the weak links in man coverage. Darrelle Revis isn't the answer for the Jets - Welker often hides in the slot or in stack formations and works the middle of the field, out of Revis' range. If the Patriots can peck the Jets to death with plays like these, they can win easily.

New York Jets

The Jets' running game can sometimes get a little too fancy. Coordinator Brian Schottenheimer is infatuated with Wildcat and Pistol formations, and while trick-play specialist Brad Smith has had his moments this year, the offense often grinds to a halt when he enters the game to take a direct snap. The Jets are a very effective rushing team when they keep things simple, and they proved against the Colts that they can generate yardage by running the ball when opponents are thinking pass.

/

The Jets catch the defense blitzing on this run: as shown in blue lines, the cornerback over Cotchery charges straight into the backfield, while the defensive end runs a stunt that pulls him away from Tomlinson. It's another advantage of running on a passing down: the blitzing defenders are in no position to stop Tomlinson, and Ferguson has no one to block until he (and Tomlinson) are 10 yards downfield. A great block by Braylon Edwards (19) on his cornerback nets a few extra yards for Tomlinson.

Slideshow
Image: Matt Forte

Chicago's Matt Forte is one of 10 players who will be key to their team's success.

< Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

PITTSBURGH STEELERS
When a team has two outstanding pass rushers, we usually expect them to attack from opposite sides of the formation. Think Dwight Freeney and Robert Mathis, or (a few years ago) Michael Strahan and Osi Umenyiora. But the Steelers like to blitz James Harrison (10.5 sacks) and Lamar Woodley (10 sacks) off the same edge. When two of the league's fastest, hardest-to-block defenders attack side-by-side, a blocking mismatch is all but guaranteed.

/

There are no fancy stunts or twists on this blitz. Farrior sacrifices himself inside; he wants either the right guard or running back to block him, creating space for his teammates. Both Woodley and Harrison take a wide approach, attacking upfield and trying to get outside the shoulders of their blockers. The opponent hopes to stop this blitz by making the running back block Farrior while the right guard and tackle range far to their right to knock out the other Steelers. Against many teams, this blocking scheme would work, but Woodley and Harrison are simply too fast for most offensive linemen. Once Woodley gets tangled up with the right tackle, he knows no one will be able to block Harrison, so he slows down and creates a little pile-up. Harrison is barely touched before nailing the quarterback for an eight-yard loss.

The Ravens' offensive line has trouble with speed-rushing defenders. The Steelers will scheme to isolate Woodley and Harrison against huge, slow linemen like Michael Oher and Marshal Yanda. By putting their best pass rushers on one side of the formation, they can dictate who will block whom, creating exactly the matchups they want.

BALTIMORE RAVENS
In early December, the Ravens learned the hard way that it does not pay to be bomb-dependent against the Steelers. The Ravens completed 61- and 67-yard passes in Week 12, but the Steelers were happy to trade two bombs for four sacks, a Joe Flacco fumble, lots of incomplete passes, and 10 points. The Ravens reinvigorated their short passing attack in Sunday's wild-card win, and their best hope to move the football on Saturday lies with a familiar-but-often-overlooked old face: tight end Todd Heap.

/

There's nothing fancy about the route combination shown: Anquan Boldin (81) runs a deep post, forcing the safety to backpedal. The other receivers run out-routes, creating wide-open space in the middle of the field. Once Flacco sees that the linebackers really are blitzing, he knows he must throw quickly. Luckily, Heap runs a shallow crossing route at five yards, shaking off his defender by pretending to go deep (and getting away with a tiny push) before cutting across the middle. Heap catches the pass three yards shy of a first down, but with the cornerbacks along the sidelines and the safety deep, he only has to outrun his defender to pick up a first down.

Slideshow
Image: Matt Forte

Chicago's Matt Forte is one of 10 players who will be key to their team's success.

< Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4


Slideshow

Channel Finder