Oregon

Brackets Revealed for PK80

Brackets Revealed for PK80

The brackets for the much-hyped PK80 tournament have been released, and if you are a fan of college basketball you are in for a treat.

The tournament, boasted as one of the largest regular season tournaments in college basketball history, features 16 teams – a list that includes a combined 24 National Championships, three of last season’s Final Four teams, as well as five other teams that made the field of 64 last season.

PK80 will consist of two brackets, “Victory” and “Motion,” with each bracket crowning their own champion over the weekend. 

According to a press release, the names were chosen to pay tribute Nike and Phil Knight –

- “Victory”: In Greek mythology, Nike was considered the goddess of Victory

- “Motion”: The swoosh logo is not only meant to represent motion, but to also resemble the wings of the goddess Nike

Here is a quick breakdown of both:

VICTORY:

The “Victory” bracket will play host to local teams Oregon and Portland, 2017 National Champions North Carolina, as well as UConn, Georgetown, Oklahoma, Michigan State, and Arkansas.

Round 1 will see North Carolina vs Portland, Arkansas vs Oklahoma, Georgetown vs Michigan State, and UConn vs Oregon.

MOTION:

“Motion” will be headlined by 2017 runner-up and Northwest favorite Gonzaga, along with fellow local school Portland State. They will be joined by Coach K and the Duke Blue Devils, Texas, Stanford, Ohio State, Florida, and Butler.

Round 1 will see Duke vs Portland State,  Butler vs Texas, Florida vs Stanford, and Gonzaga vs Ohio State.

Click here to view a printable bracket

The two brackets will run simultaneously at Moda Center and Veterans Memorial Coliseum from Thursday, Nov. 23 to Sunday, Nov. 26, with no games being played on Saturday.

Note: The champsions of the individual brackets will not play eachother, instead the brackets are being treated like two individual tournaments. 

For more information visit pkinvitational.com

 

 

 

Ducks aren't done writing their story

Ducks aren't done writing their story

GLENDALE, Ariz. - Oregon traveled to Arizona for the Final Four with a friendly reminder onboard of the heights the basketball program has achieved in the past and what the goal is this weekend in the desert. 

The Ducks brought with them the 1939 national championship trophy won by the "Tall Firs" back when the team was actually called the Webfoots. 

Current players took photos of and with the trophy, touched it and allowed its inspiration to soak in. 

"It’s a motivation to bring another one back," UO junior forward Dillon Brooks said.

As sophomore guard Tyler Dorsey put it, the Ducks aren't ready to close this chapter. 

“We’re definitely making history and that should be talked about, but we have to keep writing the history and win the national championship," he said. "We’re not done, yet, and we know that as a team."

No. 3 Oregon (32-5) will play No. 1 North Carolina (31-7) at 5:45 p.m. on Saturday at University of Phoenix Stadium. 

For the Tar Heels, who have now been to 20 Final Fours with five national championships, it's a chance to atone for last year's heartbreaking, 77-74 loss to Villanova in the championship game on a buzzer beater. 

“They are experienced and they want to get back to that game," Dorsey said.

Oregon has already tasted its own form of redemption by reaching the Final Four after losing badly last season to Oklahoma in the Elite Eight. As for the Tar Heels' goals, Brooks said they aren't Oregon's concern. 

“We faced a lot of hot teams, a lot of teams that had motivation to go far, like Michigan, Kansas and Rhode Island," Brooks said. "We just try to crush that all down and try to play our game and really be confident in ourselves.”

UO coach Dana Altman said the Ducks have done well sticking to their routine. 

"It was a little easier the last two weekends because there wasn't all the hype and the media and so forth," he said. "But we're going to try to keep it as close to our routine as possible, and try to get the guys to focus on the game Saturday. And we get to practice here when we get done with all this in just a little bit and hopefully get them refocused and ready to go for North Carolina."

Oregon isn't losing out on any fun. They have enjoyed themselves. The idea is to not allow the fun to interfere with the goals.

“Now we have to set a new mindset,” UO forward Jordan Bell said. “It’s another four-team tournament. We’ve got to win this tournament and if we win it, it’s finally done and we can celebrate it.”

The 1939 trophy serves as a reminder. 

“It was a great feeling to have that there,” Brooks said.

A companion for that national title trophy can't be had on Monday, however, if the Ducks don't win on Saturday. 

“We can be out of here Saturday if we lose that game," Dorsey said. "So, we’re going to enjoy the process. We’re going to soak it all up. It’s an experience of a lifetime that many people don’t get. You definitely have to enjoy it in the moment.”

Kansas' Landen Lucas faces father Richard Lucas' former team in Elite Eight

Kansas' Landen Lucas faces father Richard Lucas' former team in Elite Eight

KANSAS CITY - It finally happened during Landen Lucas' freshman year in high school. 

He took his dad in a game of one-on-one, 21-14. Took him to school by using all of the tricks of the trade his father Richard Lucas, a former star at Oregon from 1987 through 1991, has passed on to him. 

"It was a dark day," the 6-foot-6 Richard Lucas said outside of the Westin Hotel where he was staying in Kansas City. 

Landen remembers it differently. It's more of a fond memory for him, especially given that his dad never took it easy on him even as a young child.

"I wanted him to earn it," Richard said. 

Landen earned it and then some. 

"A couple of years after that, we played again - I was out of shape, that's my excuse - but I couldn't even get a shot off," Richard Lucas, 47, said. "He was so much more athletic and long and stronger."

The 6-10 Landen, who averages 7.9 points and 8.4 rebounds per game while shooting 64 percent, has dominated the former Duck center ever since. On Saturday in the Elite Eight, he will try to do the same against the current Ducks in a game that will tug at the heart strings for both. 

Both Landen and his father, of course, absolutely want No. 1 Kansas (31-4) to be victorious. But that doesn't mean there won't be some strong emotions pulling them the other way, as well.

"It's a very weird thing for me," Landen said Friday at the Sprint Center. "Especially because just growing up, I always watched Oregon. Loved Oregon because of my parents and what dad was able to do there...It's a connection that was cool and all, but the second I came to Kansas it was all about Kansas, and now them being the opponent, I'm just excited about it and excited to go out and play."

--- Growing up a duckling

Landen's childhood was painted green and yellow from an early age. His father's love for Oregon permeated throughout the house, shaping his son's admiration for the Ducks. 

"Growing up I just wanted to be like him," Landen Lucas said. "I would always watch the tapes that he had...He has his highlight tape he will show me every now and then when he wants to brag a little bit. But it is fun to watch him and see what he did in college."

Richard Lucas, who appears as a panelist on CSN's Talkin' Ducks, did the dirty work for the Ducks. Rebounding. Blocking shots. Hustle plays.

"I realized very quickly that if I rebounded the basketball the coaches had a tough time not playing me," Lucas said. "Then the points came."

He passed on that work ethic to Landen. When Landen played youth games as young as age 7, his father would be there barking at him to box out and rebound.

Landen listened.

"He was able to do that for his team, and told me that if I'm able to do that at the highest level I can help any team out," Landen said. "And having a great team like we have we do with great players, I just need to do my job, the small things and that's enough for us to win."

--- Setting his own path

Lucas had an interesting high school career, starting out at Sunset for two seasons before transferring to famed Findley Prep in Henderson, Nev., (essentially a basketball factory) only to return to the Beaverton area to play at Westview, a rival of Sunset's. 

That move brought out the haters from Sunset, but that didn't impact Lucas, who had his sights set on going big time. 

Landen Lucas might have followed in his father's footsteps had the Ducks in 2012 been as good as they are now. But back then, Landen viewed Oregon under coach Dana Altman as a fledgling program that relied too heavily on transfers.  

"I wasn't sure what direction it was heading," Landen said before pointing out that UO appears to be a lot different now, a testament, he stated, to Altman's vision.

Richard Lucas hoped his son would end up at Oregon but ultimately determined that the Ducks' style of play didn't involve tossing the ball into the big man often enough to make it the right fit for Landen.

"We realized pretty quickly that the style of play at the time they were doing was a little bit different than what we were looking for," Richard Lucas said. 

Landen's career at Kansas got off to a rocky start. He redshirted as a freshman and barely played the following season.

Richard Lucas recalled when Kansas coach Bill Self told him he wanted to trade Landen as an 18-year-old for Landen as a 23-year-old fifth-year senior who was going to play a lot.

"It was hard to talk to Landen about that because kids want to play," Richard Lucas said.

Landen resisted at first but soon recognized the value in redshirting especially when he likely wouldn't have played anyway, and he could focus on developing his game and getting off to a good start academically.

Altman remembers recruiting Lucas and hoping he would indeed want to go where his father had starred. Even though that didn't work out, Altman said he's happy for Lucas and how he has developed his game since redshirting. 

"It also shows his perseverance, you know, it didn't start out well for him, the redshirt and he didn't get to play much the first couple of years," Altman said. "But he stayed with it and, you know, it speaks to his character."

Altman pointed out that a lot of young players look to transfer when they don't become instant starts, let alone are asked to redshirt.  

"We're really happy for him, great guy, great family," Altman said. "His dad is a great guy. Really happy for him. I hope he doesn't play well tomorrow, but he's had a heck of a career."

Self said he recruited Landen with the idea of him being a good “program guy.” Instead, he got much more.

“All he did was come in and start for three years, basically, and has become probably as an important part of our program as anybody we've had,” Self said. “You hate to look at a team over the last three years and say, why would you be without him and the answer would be not very good.”

Before each game Richard will give Landed a pep talk and notes on what to watch for based on having watched the opponent. After games they would debrief to go over what happens.

"He is so smart that that's less and less," Richard Lucas said. "He knows what he did wrong and what he can do better."

Landen said he takes his father’s advice to heart.

"I try to take his advice and listen to him, good or bad because I know that he knows what he is talking about," Landen said.

Clearly Richard Lucas’ schooling of his son paid off.

“He's been a real pleasure to coach, and he's very, very bright.” Self said. “He gets it. He gets the big picture. Certainly he has grown so much since he's been here.”

--- The chase for 18 rebounds and beyond.

Richard’s career-high 18 rebounds against Stanford in 1991 remains a point of contention between father and son. He elder Lucas has held that number over Landen his entire college career, challenging him to tie or beat it.

Landen did just that. Sort of. 

Landen Lucas, who had 12 rebounds once as a redshirt sophomore, 16 in a game as a redshirt junior and 17 earlier this season, finally grabbed 18 on Feb. 24 during a 92-89 win over Iowa State.

However, that win came in overtime. The key word being "overtime."

"Doesn't count, sorry!" Richard Lucas said. "Sorry. I mean, come on."

The elder Lucas points out that Landen got three of his 18 rebounds in overtime. So, according to dad, he still holds the family record. 

When asked about it, Landen just shook his head. 

"He's not counting that," he said with a laugh. "I've got to get to at least 18 or more so I can shut him up so he won't talk about it anymore."

When told of that declaration, Richard just laughed.

"You know what, he's been trying for years," he said. "He's. Been. Trying. For. Years. To do that. So, we'll see."

--- Beating Oregon.

The goal is to win on Saturday. Elation would follow. A twinge of pain for both Lucas men would still exist.

“Landen and I talked briefly last night about the situation,” Self said. “He's a big fan of the Ducks not only because he grew up in Portland but because his father played there and was a good player there. So there's pride there about that with his family.”

But that pride factor has shifted. Dad will be wearing Kansas gear. But he admits that he won’t be able to view Oregon as a faceless opponent. Meanwhile, Landen has no choice.

“He told me last night, he said, ‘Coach, I've seen 'em play at least 15 times this year,’” Self said.  “Which he wouldn't be watching any other teams from the Pac-12 play that amount of time unless there was a vested interest with his father. We'll talk about it. We'll talk about it, but he has a lot of respect for back home.”

He has more respect for his goals. The team’s goals. What is at stake. Oregon will have other chances to reach the Final Four. This is Landen’s final shot. And the Ducks, albeit a program he and his father love, stands in the way.

"This is what I stuck it out for,” he said, “and really what motived me earlier in my career."

Oregon's Chris Boucher is devastated but supportive

Oregon's Chris Boucher is devastated but supportive

KANSAS CITY - Oregon senior forward Chris Boucher expected to be an integral part of the Ducks' run at a Final Four appearance. 

His shot blocking, rebounding, inside and outside scoring prowess figured to help UO make such a run. Then, it all came crashing down for Boucher while attempting to block a shot against California during the semifinals of the Pac-12 Tournament two weekends ago in Las Vegas, Nev. 

The next day, Boucher was ruled out for the rest of the season with a torn ACL in his left knee. He since has been relegated to cheerleader while the No. 3 Ducks (32-5) have carved out a path to the Elite Eight where they will face No. 1 Kansas (31-4) on Saturday night. 

"Well, it's been hard for sure, but seeing my team getting into the tournament and all covers for it a little bit," Boucher said today during media availability at the Sprint Center. "You always want to be on the floor and play. Definitely hurts sometimes to watch them do it so good and you can't do anything about it."

Senior guard Dylan Ennis can relate. He missed virtually all of last season with a foot injury that forced him to watch Oregon reach the Elite Eight without him. 

"As a senior, I know how hard it is and lucky I got my year back, but him going through this his senior year he's been a big part of this and especially with him on the bench he's so encouraging and he's taken that role as being the next coach, that positive reinforcement," Ennis said. "So everything he is doing we can't be more grateful for him."

Oregon lost the Pac-12 Tournament championship game to Arizona without Boucher, but has won three NCAA Tournament games since. Still, it's obvious that the Ducks miss his 11.8 points, 6.1 rebounds and 2.5 blocked shots per game. Losing him has placed more pressure on junior forward Jordan Bell to protect the rim. 

"We lost our advantage with the blocks with Chris," Altman said. "We were averaging almost seven blocks a game with him, and I think in the four games without him now I think we have eight total. So Jordan has become a little less aggressive with his blocks, trying to stay out of foul trouble. He's done a great job of picking up rebounding. Chris was our second leading rebounder and third leading scorer besides being the guy who blocked the most shots. Defensively we've slipped. Our numbers in the last four games are not as good as they were previous to him going down. So we've tried to make up for that a little bit offensively."

To do what he can, Boucher said he watches games intently looking for details he can pass on to teammates. 

"I'm just trying to help my team and tell them what I could see from the bench and they could go from there," Boucher said.

It's something, but not what Boucher and Ducks had planned for his role to be during this this time of the season. 

Oregon takes a huge step up in competition against No. 1 Kansas

Oregon takes a huge step up in competition against No. 1 Kansas

KANSAS CITY - Oregon will face a different NCAA Tournament animal in the Midwest Region semifinals Saturday night. 

No. 1 Kansas is more talented, more tournament experienced and more dominant than any team UO has faced this season, let alone in the this tournament. 

Oregon needed two late threes from Tyler Dorsey to survive Rhode Island, 75-72 in the second round, and on Thursday night watched as a would-be buzzer beater from Michigan banged off of the rim allowing the Ducks to escape with a 69-68 win over the Wolverines. 

Through three tournament games, counting a 93-77 win over No. 14 Iona in the first round, Oregon has outscored its opponents 237 to 217. 

On the other side, Kansas has dominated its three opponents, No. 16 UC Davis (100-62), No. 9 Michigan State (90-70) and No. 4 Purdue (98-66) by a combined count of 288 to 198. 

The latter outing came here at the Sprint Center where the crowd was at least 80 percent pro Kansas. 

One one hand, it would appear that Kansas is just too dominant for Oregon. On the other hand, if Saturday's game is close, the Ducks will have been more battle tested. 

"If we're going to get there then we're going to have to sweat one out," Kansas coach Bill Self said. "We know that. Tomorrow will be a highly competitive game, we believe, regardless of the situation. We've been fortunate that we've played pretty consistently well throughout the tournament, but it's going to take another effort like that to put ourselves in a position to have a chance to advance. I'm sure Dana (Altman) is saying the same thing to his guys as well."

A quick look at the game:

No. 3 Oregon vs. No. 1 Kansas

Where: Sprint Center, Kansas City, Mo. 

When: 5:45 p.m., Thursday.

TV: TBS

Records: Ducks (32-5), Jayhawks (31-4).

Last outings: Oregon pulled out a 69-68 win over No. 7 Michigan on Thursday. Kansas dominated No. 4 Purdue in the second game, 98-66. 

Coaches: UO's Dana Altman (186-69 at Oregon, 596-312 Division I). Kansas' Bill Self (413-85 at Kansas at Rhode Island, 620-190 overall)

Key Ducks: Dillon Brooks, F, Jr. (16.3 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 41.2 3pt%), Jordan Bell, F, Jr. (10.8 ppg, 8.5 rpg, 76 blocks); Tyler Dorsey, G, Soph. (14.1 ppg, 3.4 rpg, 41.4 3pt%), Dylan Ennis, G, Sr., (10.7 ppg, 4.4 rpg, 3.1 apg).

Key Jayhawks: Frank Mason III, G, Sr. (20.9 ppg, 5.2 apg, 4.2 rpg, 48 3pt%); Josh Jackson, G, Fr. (16.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg); Devonte' Graham, G, Jr., (13.7 ppg, 4.2 apg), Landen Lucas, C, Sr. (7.9 ppg., 8.4 rpg).

Notes: NBADraft.Net projects Kansas' Jackson as the No. 1-overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft...Oregon's Brooks, Bell and senior forward Chris Boucher are projected to be second-round picks... This is Oregon's sixth appearance in the Elite Eight and fourth since 2002. They made it in 1939, 1960, 2002, 2007, 2016 and 2017... Oregon this season set a school record with 32 wins. Kansas (31-4) and Villanova (32-4) are the only two other programs with 30 wins ore more. 

Kansas coach Bill Self laments missing out on Oregon guard Tyler Dorsey

Kansas coach Bill Self laments missing out on Oregon guard Tyler Dorsey

KANSAS CITY - Oregon sophomore guard Tyler Dorsey has been tearing up the postseason for the Ducks, who face Kansas Saturday in the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament. 

His play has served as a reminder to Kansas coach Bill Self of a good one that got away. No. 1 Kansas (31-4) recruited the former five-star recruit out of Pasadena, Calif., hard and even had him in for a visit. Yet, Dorsey chose No. 3 Oregon (32-5) in the end. 

"We wanted Tyler, bad," Self said today at the Sprint Center. "I just thought he was a guard that could play on the ball and off the ball and certainly that's played out to be 100% accurate. He's a point guard that can shoot and score. He's a terrific kid. We really liked him. A lot. Unfortunately he didn't like us as much as we liked him. But it turned out to be what great choice he made! Turned out to be perfect from him, at least from the outside looking in."

Dorsey during the postseason is averaging 23 points per game and is shooting 61.2 percent from the field. Oregon could need him to remain hot if it expects to get past Kansas and into the Final Four. 

Self said Oregon has an abundance of shooters that make the Ducks dangerous. "You've got one in particular, that's probably the hottest player in the tournament shooting the ball in Tyler Dorsey," he added.

Oregon returns to regional finals after 69-68 win over Michigan

usatsi_9966750.jpg
USA Today

Oregon returns to regional finals after 69-68 win over Michigan

Oregon 69, Michigan 68 

How Oregon won: No. 3 Oregon (32-5) once again found a way late in a NCAA Tournament game to pull out a narrow victory and advance, winning 69-68 over No. 7 Michigan (26-12) Thursday night at the Sprint Center in Kansas City, Mo. 

Oregon sophomore guard Tyler Dorsey, the hero in the team's second-round win over Rhode Island, made a three-foot shot to give UO a 69-68 lead with 1:09 remaining, and the Ducks got stops on Michigan's final three possessions over the final two minutes and change to earn the win. 

Michigan guard Derrick Walton Jr. missed a jump shot from 18 feet out at the buzzer.

Michigan attempted 31 three-point shots, making just 11. The Wolverines made 14 of 27 two-point field goals. Michigan coach John Bielein said there were several threes his team shouldn't have taken but also added that the Wolverines were mindful of Oregon forward Jordan Bell's defensive prowess inside. 

Oregon shot 44.8 percent from the field. Michigan made 43.1 percent of its shots and committed just one turnover in the second half after committing seven in the first half. The Ducks only turned the ball over five times all game. 

What it means: Oregon advances to the regional finals for the second consecutive season. Oregon last year lost 80-68 to Oklahoma in the West Regional finals in Anaheim, Calif. 

Key sequence: Oregon led 60-55 after senior guard Dylan Ennis hit a jump shot with 5:10 remaining. Michigan, however, answered with back-to-back three pointers. First D.J. Wilson made one from 24 feet out off an assist from Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman. Dorsey then missed a jumper for Oregon setting up a three from Derrick Walton Jr. from 27 feet out to give the Wolverines a 61-60 lead with 4:15 remaining in the game, and causing UO coach Dana Altman to call a timeout.

The talking to worked. Dorsey came out of the timeout and got a three from the corner from to make the score 63-61, UO. But then, Irvin came back for Michigan with a three to give the Wolverines a 64-63 lead. 

Michigan led 68-65 with 1:49 remaining when Ennis missed the front end of a one-and-one. But Bell got the offensive rebound and scored to make the score 68-67, Michigan. 

Some 40 seconds later, Dorsey hit what proved to be the game-winner. 

High-flying Ducks: Dorsey finished with 20 points on 7-of-15 shooting and made five of his seven three-point attempts. 

Bell had 16 points and 13 rebounds. 

Ennis gave the Ducks 10 points, five rebounds and three assists. Oregon junior forward Dillon Brooks had a relatively quiet night scoring 12 points on 5-of-13 shooting. However, he added four rebounds and five assists. 

Fowl play: UO junior forward Kavell Bigby-Williams only gave the Ducks one points and two rebounds in eight minutes of action. 

Up next: Oregon will play the winner of tonight's second game between No. 1 Kansas and No. 4 Purdue on Saturday. 

Oregon's Kavell Bigby-Williams working on avoiding foul trouble

Oregon's Kavell Bigby-Williams working on avoiding foul trouble

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Oregon junior forward Kavell Bigby-Williams has no qualms about mixing it up inside with the physical playing style of Rhode Island on Sunday during the second round of the NCAA Tournament. 

“I see myself as a physical guy and I feel like I’m a guy that can bang inside so I’m looking forward to the challenge," he said following practice Saturday afternoon at the Golden 1 Center.

At 6-foot-11 and 230 pounds, Bigby-Williams has the physique to stand up to the physical style of play the Rams will bring to the court. The question is whether or not Bigby-Williams can avoid foul trouble enough to remain a factor in the a game. 

Bigby-Williams will be needed to perform well if the Ducks (30-5) are able to overcome the loss of 6-10 forward Chris Boucher, out for the season with a knee injury. The book on the talented Bigby-Williams, however, is that he has frequent battles with consistency and foul trouble. 

He racked up four fouls in 14 minutes during the team's 93-77 win Friday over Iona in the first round. On the season, Bigby-Williams has committed 49 personal fouls in 324 minutes, or one every 6.6 minutes. For comparisons sake; UO forward Jordan Bell averages a personal foul every 15.5 minutes (64 in 992 minutes). Boucher averaged a personal foul every 8.9 minutes (83 in 730). 

Bigby-Williams' potential is obvious. Over every 30 minutes of action, he averages roughly 10 points, 10 rebounds and 2.4 blocked shots per game. Such production would come in handy for the Ducks. But for that to happen, Bigby-Williams must be able to stay on the court for longer stretches before getting into foul trouble. 

Some fouls he picks up, Bigby-Williams said, are the product of mental lapses. Others just come from him playing too aggressively, which UO coach Dana Altman says he can accept. Bigby-Williams gave UO six rebounds in his 14 minutes against IO

For the most part, Bigby-Williams said he merely needs to continue to grow as a player to avoid getting into foul trouble. 

“I feel like I need to go out there and relax and by myself," he said. "Sometimes I’m thinking about things too much and it affects me. but I feel like now that  I’m getting more time I can show what I can do and hopefully I can keep getting better.”

First round preview: Oregon vs. Iona

First round preview: Oregon vs. Iona

The Ducks are headed to the NCAA Tournament as the No. 3 seed in the Midwest Region. 

First up? The Iona Gaels. 

While an upset is unlikely, Oregon needs to watch out for Iona's 6-foot-8 senior forward Jordan Washington (17.9 ppg, 7.4 rpg). Most noteable, Washington draws an average of nine fouls per game (2nd highest in the nation). Getting into foul trouble could be troublesome for Oregon, especially now that they are without senior forward Chris Boucher, lost for the season with a knee injury he suffered Friday night during the Pac-12 Tournament. 

A quick look at the game:

No. 3 Oregon vs. No. 14 Iona Gaels

Where: Golden 1 Center, Sacramento, Calif. 

When: 11 a.m.

TV: TBS   

Records: Ducks (29-5), Gaels (22-12).

Last outings: Oregon's late rally fell short against Arizona in the Pac-12 Tournament title game. The Gaels lost four of their final seven regular-season games before bouncing back in the MAAC tournament. An overtime victory over Siena in the MAAC championship game secured Iona's second straight conference tournament championship. 

Coaches: UO's Dana Altman (183-69 at Oregon, 593-312 Division I). Iona's Tim Cluess (140–65 at Iona, 238–88 overall)

Key Ducks: Dillon Brooks, F, Jr. (16.3 ppg, 1.2 spg, 41.4 3pt%); Jordan Bell, F, Jr. (10.7 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 2.1 bpg, 1.3 spg);  Tyler Dorsey, G, Soph. (13.3 ppg, 38.9 3pt%)

Key Gaels: Jordan Washington, F, Sr. (17.9 ppg, 7.4 rpg, 55.1 FG%); Jon Severe, F, Sr. (11.3 ppg, 3.7 rpg, 43.0 3pt%); Rickey McGill, G, Soph. (10.8 ppg, 5.2 apg, 1.8 spg)

Notes: The Ducks have never faced Iona...The Ducks are one of just five teams in this year’s field to have won a game in each of the last four NCAA Tournaments. The other teams are Gonzaga, Kansas, North Carolina and Wichita State.

No. 5 Oregon vs. No. 10 UCLA: What you need to know

No. 5 Oregon vs. No. 10 UCLA: What you need to know

Call it Oregon's chance to prove it deserves to be on top of the Pac-12 conference. Call it an opportunity for UCLA to get revenge. Call it the biggest college game of the week. Call it whatever you want. What we know for sure is that No. 5 Oregon plays at No. 10 UCLA on Thursday night in what is sure to be an epic showdown. 

During the first Oregon-UCLA matchup last December, the Ducks (21-3, 10-1 Pac-12) handed the Bruins (21-3, 8-3) their first conference defeat, courtesy of Dillon Brooks’ last-second three-pointer that gave UO an 89-87 win at home. 

Now the Ducks begin the toughest stretch of their season at UCLA with the regular season conference championship on the line. UO plays five of its final seven regular season games on the road with two coming at the Bruins and USC (20-4, 7-4) on Saturday night. 

A quick look at Thursday's game:

No. 5 Oregon vs. No. 10 UCLA

Where: Pauley Pavilion, Los Angeles, Calif. 

When: 7 p.m., Thursday.

TV: ESPN

Records: Ducks (21-3, 10-1), Bruins (21-3, 8-3). 

Last outings: The Ducks destroyed then-No. 5 Arizona 85-58 at home last Saturday, extending their nation leading home winning streak to 40 games. The Bruins are coming off a beatdown win of their own, defeating Washington 107-66, in Seattle on Saturday.

Coaches: UO's Dana Altman (175-67 at Oregon, 585-310 Division I). UCLA’s Steve Alford (86-43 at UCLA, 549-278 overall). 

Key Ducks: G Tyler Dorsey, 6-4, So., (12.1 ppg, 3.5 rpg), G Dylan Ennis, 6-2, Sr., (11.5 ppg, 4.4 rpg, .390 3PT%), G Payton Pritchard, 6-2, Fr., (8.2 ppg, 3.1 rpg), F Jordan Bell, 6-9, Jr., (11.1 ppg, 7.7 rpg, 2.1 bpg), F Dillon Brooks, 6-7, Jr., (14.2 ppg, 2.8 rpg), F Chris Boucher, 6-10, Sr., (12.4 ppg, 7.0 rpg, 2.8 bpg).

Key Bruins: F TJ Leaf, 6-10, Fr., (17.1 ppg, 8.9 rpg, 2.7 apg), G Lonzo Ball, 6-6, Fr., (7.8 apg, 15.1 ppg), G Bryce Alford, 6-3 Sr., (16.4 ppg, 2.4 apg), C Thomas Welsh, 7-0, Jr, (8.3 rpg, 10.4 ppg).

Notes: This will be the third meeting between Oregon as UCLA as top-10 opponents. The Bruins won the previous two meetings in 1975 (107-103) and 2007 (69-57).