Source: Phillies agree to $60 million deal with Carlos Santana

Source: Phillies agree to $60 million deal with Carlos Santana

The Phillies' busy Friday continued with a pricey free-agent signing.

The Phils have agreed to a three-year, $60 million deal with former Cleveland Indian Carlos Santana, a source confirmed to NBC Sports Philadelphia's Jim Salisbury.

It is by far the most expensive contract the Phillies have given out under the Matt Klentak-Andy MacPhail regime.

They had the money. When the offseason began, the only player the Phillies had signed to a multi-million dollar deal was Odubel Herrera.

Santana, 31, has always been a high-walk power hitter. From 2011 through 2017, he walked between 88 and 113 times each season, all while maintaining relatively low strikeout totals for a man with such power and plate selection.

In 2016, Santana set a career high with 34 home runs. Last season, he hit .259/.363/.455 with 37 doubles, 23 homers and 79 RBIs.

This addition provides the Phillies with much-needed pop to protect Rhys Hoskins and also gives the Phils added versatility. Santana is a switch-hitter who came up as a catcher, but he hasn't caught since 2014. The last three seasons, he has played primarily first base. In his eight seasons, Santana has also started 26 games at third base and seven in right field.

The move likely means Hoskins will play left field, and it could facilitate another Phillies trade of an outfielder such as Nick Williams, Aaron Altherr or Odubel Herrera.

Phillies trade Freddy Galvis for pitching prospect

Phillies trade Freddy Galvis for pitching prospect

Updated 12:25 p.m.

The Phillies have been aggressively shopping Freddy Galvis this offseason and they've found a suitor.

The Phils on Friday traded Galvis to the Padres for pitching prospect Enyel De Los Santos.

De Los Santos, 21, was ranked 13th on the Padres’ prospect list by MLB.com.

In the hitter-friendly Texas League (Double A) last season, De Los Santos went 10-6 with a 3.78 ERA, striking out 138 in 150 innings. De Los Santos was originally signed by the Mariners as an amateur free agent in 2014 before being traded to San Diego in November 2015 for reliever Joaquin Benoit (a former Phillie).

The Padres had done extensive homework this offseason on the Phillies' 28-year-old shortstop. Last season, the 71-91 Padres used 33-year-old Erick Aybar at shortstop for the majority of games. San Diego now has a top-notch defender at the game's most important defensive position.

Galvis has been a Gold Glove finalist two years in a row and was probably robbed this season when he committed just seven errors in 637 defensive chances but still lost out to Brandon Crawford.

A free agent at season's end, Galvis has hit .248/.292/.390 the last two seasons with an average of 28 doubles, four triples, 16 homers and 64 RBIs.

The Phillies were known to be looking for pitching in exchange for Galvis, but his trade value wasn't as high as it could've been because of his impending free agency.

J.P. Crawford will step in as the Phillies' everyday shortstop. The soon-to-be-23-year-old Crawford hit .214 with a .356 on-base percentage in 23 games as a rookie in 2017.

Joel Embiid doesn't want Sixers to end up like OKC

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Joel Embiid doesn't want Sixers to end up like OKC

Joel Embiid doesn't want the Sixers to end up like the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Not the 2017-18 Thunder, but OKC circa 2011-12.

Embiid is convinced that at some point soon, the media will turn on him and the Sixers. 

Speaking specifically about the core trio of Embiid, Ben Simmons and Markelle Fultz, Embiid told ESPN's Ramona Shelburne:

"I think with everything, the main thing we have to do is just stay together because I feel like there's going to be some type of situation where people say who is better between us three. And that's how it splits."

Shelburne, who wrote a long and interesting feature on Embiid this week, told more of the story Wednesday on Zach Lowe's podcast.

She recalled talking to Embiid about his social media presence at All-Star weekend in 2016, when he told her, "I'm just trying to have as much fun before everybody turns on me."

Shelburne pointed out the uniqueness of a then-22-year-old — who had been in the United States just seven years — understanding the "fame cycle" well enough to know that things could soon turn.

"I saw what happened in Oklahoma City with (James) Harden, (Russell) Westbrook and (Kevin) Durant and I don't want that to happen here," Shelburne recalled Embiid saying.

If the Sixers get to that point ... it'll probably be a good problem to have. Just prior to the 2012-13 season, the Thunder traded Harden to Houston in one of the worst trades in recent NBA history. OKC did it for several reasons — salary cap, personalities, only having enough shots to go around. And really, who knows if Harden would have been able to grow into this superstar had he been sharing the ball the next handful of seasons with two other alphas?

Embiid and Fultz have already grown close, and it's important to Embiid that the three young Sixers don't get caught up in the "Who takes the last shot?" conversations or "Who should be the All-Star" questions that inevitably come up. 

Luckily for the Sixers, Embiid, Simmons and Fultz have different enough skill sets that they should be able to coexist. It's not directly analogous to the OKC situation where all three players needed the ball in their hands. The Sixers were built this way for a reason. 

Right now, it's clear Embiid is the alpha of the group. He's the go-to guy in crunch time and again has a top-five usage rate. When Simmons eventually becomes more comfortable with his jump shot and Fultz finally makes his impact on the court, we'll see whether or not Embiid was prescient.