She’s a Girl! So What?

flag_football_-_nygvsla.jpg

She’s a Girl! So What?

She could feel the ground beneath her shaking. A loud eruption pierces the air as all of the fans in the crowd simultaneously stop stomping and jump to their feet in jubilation. She smiles, celebrating along with the crowd. The kicker trots out onto the field, surveys the distance and lines up. The ball travels through the air slowly, almost deciding its fate, but flies through the goal posts. The referees blow their whistles, signaling the end of the game and another victory. The bench clears and the football players gather around the kicker to start the celebration. The kicker’s helmet falls to the ground and her ponytail swings free.

Those were the memories of a happy mother watching her daughter play a sport she loved. Watching as young boys celebrated her daughter’s prowess as a kicker, not caring that she is a girl. However, those fun memories were short-lived.

LEARN MORE AT WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION

Beyond X’s & O’s: Gender Bias and Coaches of Women’s College Sports

brenda_frese_-_msuvsmd.jpg

Beyond X’s & O’s: Gender Bias and Coaches of Women’s College Sports

This nationwide online survey, the largest of its kind to-date, was designed to generate facts and analysis of the workplace experiences and views of both female and male coaches of intercollegiate women’s sports. This research is unique in that it is the first to assess male coaches of women’s teams and make comparisons with female coaches.

The data-driven research confirms there is systemic gender bias; it’s not sporadic or limited to a few institutions. Key findings include:

  • Bias is associated with gender of the coach, not the gender of the team. Many women coaches perceive gender bias, fewer of their male counterparts recognize it.
  • Most women coaches believe it is easier for men to secure high level jobs, salary increases, promotions, and multi-year contracts. 4 out of 5 women coaches think it is easier for men to get top-level coaching jobs.
  • Many women fear unfair treatment, retaliation and loss of their jobs if they express Title IX concerns.
  • More women are less willing to voice their opinions outside of the athletic department and are less involved in decision-making inside the athletic department.

LEARN MORE AT WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION

The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports

girls_hs_track_and_field_-_41st_prefontaine_classic.jpg

The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports

“The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports,” a study co-authored by Don Sabo, Ph.D., Director, Center for Research on Physical Activity, Sports & Health (CRPASH), D’Youville College, and Philip Veliz, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Michigan, analyzes data from the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) Data Collection on girls’ and boys’ high school athletic opportunities between the 1999-2000 and 2009-10 school years. This is the second in the “Progress Without Equity” research report series.

Key findings from “The Decade of Decline: Gender Equity in High School Sports” include:

  • Athletic participation opportunities expanded across the decade, but boys’ allotment grew more than girls. By 2009-10, 53 athletic opportunities were offered for every 100 boys, compared with 41 opportunities for every 100 girls.
  • Despite the level of economic resources, the opportunity gap between girls and boys continued to increase. By 2010 girls participated in greater numbers than in the beginning of the decade; however, girls’ share of total athletic opportunities decreased across the decade as compared to boys’ share. During a decade of expanding athletic participation opportunities across U.S. high schools, boys received more opportunities than girls, and boys’ opportunities grew faster than those of girls.
  • By 2009-10 boys still received disproportionately more athletic opportunities than girls in all community settings—urban, suburban, towns, and rural communities.
  • In 2000, 8.2 percent of schools offered no sports programs, the percentage nearly doubled by 2010, rising to approximately 15 percent. Additionally, schools with disproportionately higher female enrollments (i.e., the student body is 56 percent female or higher) were more likely to have dropped interscholastic sports between 2000 and 2010.
  • Seven percent of public schools lost sports programs between 2000 and 2010, while less than one percent added sports to their curriculum. Given this trend in the data, it is estimated that by the year 2020, 27 percent of U.S. public high schools (4,398 schools) would be without any interscholastic sports, translating to an estimated 3.4 million young Americans (1,658,046 girls and 1,798,782 boys) who would not have any school-based sports activities to participate in by 2020 if the trend continues.

LEARN MORE AT WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION