'Dre Rumor of the Day: To Clippers for Chris Kaman

'Dre Rumor of the Day: To Clippers for Chris Kaman

Well, at the very least, it seems like Rod Thorn and Ed Stefanski are
legitimately shopping longest-tenured Sixer Andre Iguodala this
off-season. Mere days after he was rumored to be one half of a swap with
Golden State's Monta Ellis, a new proposal has trickled down the
pipeline: One sending him to Los Angeles for odd-Clipper-out Chris
Kaman. An all-star center two seasons ago, Kaman spent much of last year
injured and lost his starting spot to the younger, more athletic, more
defensively inclined DeAndre Jordan, who makes for a better fit
alongside Clips franchise power forward Blake Griffin than does Kaman.
He was effective but inconsistent upon his return, leading to rumblings
that he might be deemed expendable by L.A. brass for the team's future.

In many ways, this is a deal that makes sense on both sides. While
Kaman isn't quite the first-option scorer that Ellis is, he is a
legitimate offensive weapon, scoring 18.5 points a game on 49% shooting
in 34 minutes a game two years ago. More importantly, he's a legitimate
center, a seven-footer with post moves and a jump shot, who rebounds
well (if not spectacularly) and blocks a shot or two a game. Meanwhile,
Iguodala is exactly what the Clippers need—a versatile, defensive-minded
small forward who can defend, pass, and like just about everyone else
on that team, dunk. And with Blake and shooting guard Eric Gordon
entrenched as the top two scoring options for the Clips for years and
years to come, 'Dre could finally focus doing all those things he does
well, without being called on to any of the things he doesn't.

But while Iguodala seems a virtual no-brainer for the Clips—with
him, I'd be pretty shocked if they missed the playoffs last year—Kaman
on the Sixers is a little more of a mixed blessing. Though he can
score—better than Spencer Hawes, certainly—he's not really the
first-option scorer the Sixers need, more of a complementary piece. And
on defense, he's not a huge upgrade over Hawes—in fact, he's not a
particularly high-IQ player, and is prone to lapses in effort and
concentration, hardly the defensive anchor we need in the frontcourt.
And finally, on a team where youth and athleticism is still the core
strength, Kaman is neither particularly young (29 last April) or
particularly athletic (not a complete stiff, but there's a reason the
Clips prefer DeAndre Jordan so much).

All that said, there are advantages to dealing for Kaman beyond what
he does on the court. His deal, which pays him a little over 12 million
next year, expires at the end of the season, two years before
Iguodala's weighty contract finally lapses. He could be hugely valuable
as an expiring contract at next year's trade deadline, or he could help
the Sixers be players in the 2012 off-season—or merely offer them some
relief if they go heavy with the spending this summer. Ultimately, it's a
lower-risk, lower-reward move than dealing for Ellis would be—one that
doesn't lock the team into any long-term commitment or threaten to
interfere with any of their core players, but one which will, barring a
huge leap from some of their young guys, be relatively unlikely to be
the move that helps the Sixers take the next step.

Ultimately, of the two deals, I think I like the
swing-for-the-fences Ellis deal a little more, though both have their
advantages and would be, in my opinion, better than keeping Iguodala
around for another season. The one thing that does worry me about both
deals is that neither help the team in terms of young talent or draft
picks—neither really helps the team start the rebuilding process
straight-up, but rather offers them quality players who might just end
up keeping the Sixers afloat in mediocrity for one more season. Perhaps I
like the Ellis deal more because it has a greater chance of either
elevating the team to the next level, or screwing them up
completely—hopefully guaranteeing that at the very least, we wouldn't be
seeing another 41-41 season.

NBC Sports Philadelphia Internship - Advertising/Sales

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NBC Sports Philadelphia Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: NBC Sports Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

About NBC internships

The pick-six that 'everyone down Broad Street heard'

The pick-six that 'everyone down Broad Street heard'

Patrick Robinson was talking a little trash with some Eagles teammates before the NFC Championship, so when he came up with an interception, he sort of had to back it up.

“Two hours before the game, I was like, 'When I get a pick, I'm not going out of bounds,'" Robinson said. "When I got it, I was running down the sideline, and I was like, 'No, I definitely can't go out of bounds,' so I just cut it back upfield.”

The end result was a 50-yard return for a touchdown — a play that served to energize the Eagles, the home crowd and an entire fan base during the 38-7 win over the Vikings (see Roob's observations).

“I don't think it just pumped up the offense," Nick Foles said. "I think it pumped up the whole City of Philadelphia. I think everyone down Broad Street heard that.”

Not only did Robinson's pick-six tie the score at seven in the first quarter, it shifted the momentum in the Eagles' favor permanently.

There was an uneasy feeling over Lincoln Financial Field after the Vikings marched straight down the field on a nine-play touchdown drive. A penalty on the ensuing Eagles punt improved Minnesota's field position, while a conversion on third-and-long moved the offense close to midfield. Nothing was going right.

"We had to make a play because they drove right down and scored," Chris Long said. "If we didn't have believe in ourselves and a little toughness, you might've thought, 'Oh, man, it's gonna be a long night.' I know some people probably thought that watching on TV or whatever, but we know what we're capable of as a defense.

“On us, on defense, we had to go out and make a big play and create a turnover.”

Long did exactly that. The 32-year-old pass rusher beat the protection and reached Vikings quarterback Case Keenum mid-throw. The result was a pass that came up woefully short of its intended target — what Robinson described as "an easy pick."

Far less simple was the return. Robinson began by running down the sideline with a convoy of Eagles defenders. Then, with precious little room to maneuver and a promise not to run out of bounds, he cut all the way across to the opposite side of the field, outracing the remaining Vikings players to the pylon.

It was a runback worthy of a certain Eagles All-Pro punt returner.

“Pat, man, he was unbelievable out there," Long said. "He was like Darren Sproles with the ball.”

Robinson was happy to play the part, at one point directing fellow cornerback Ronald Darby to throw a key block that ultimately allowed him to get into the end zone.

“A lot of times you get a pick, there's always one guy that slips through the pack and gets a guy who has the ball," Robinson said. "But this time, all our guys were running hard and trying to make blocks for me.”

For a team that's leaned on home-field advantage all season long, winning nine games in their own building, you better believe that play came at a critical juncture in the contest.

"It got the crowd into it," Malcolm Jenkins said. "Defensively, that first drive, we were kind of uncharacteristic in the run game, missing tackles, just kind of leaky and unsettled. Once we got that, we evened the score back up, it was, 'OK, that was our restart.'

“The crowd is into it. Our offense got going. Defense started getting stops. That was a huge play in the game.”