All of social media piles on hapless, 0-5 Giants

All of social media piles on hapless, 0-5 Giants

At 0-5, the New York Giants are the laughingstock of the NFL and the social media posts have been absolutely ruthless.
After going 11-5 in 2016, adding Brandon Marshall and Evan Engram to their offense and re-signing Jason Pierre-Paul to a defense that allowed the fewest points in the NFC, the team was feeling pretty good. This was from July 21:

… but oh, how things have changed.
The Giants are 0-5 this season and 0-6 since this infamous photo was taken.

After their most recent loss, a 27-22 defeat to the Los Angeles Chargers, a game where they led throughout, the posts on Twitter came fast and furious.

Hit with injuries to four their wide receivers, a few familiar names reached out offering help.

Fortunately, the New York media seems to be holding it together quite well ...

When will it get better for the G-Men? Their upcoming schedule has a number of difficult matchups looming, outside of a possible showdown of winless teams in San Francisco.

For now, they’re on the bottom, looking up.

Looking back at trio of Eagles' 2016 extensions

USA Today Images/AP Images

Looking back at trio of Eagles' 2016 extensions

Back in early 2016, just after Howie Roseman had been reinstated to his post of power, he pulled out some moves from the classic Joe Banner playbook. 

He tried to find value in projection. 

Within a nine-day span in early 2016, the Eagles signed Vinny Curry, Zach Ertz and Lane Johnson to lucrative five-year extensions. Since then, Ertz and Johnson have grown into Pro Bowl players, rendering their contracts relative bargains. 

Curry simply remained a good player, which is why he was cut on Friday afternoon

While Curry finally became a starter in 2017, he had just three sacks and the team drafted Derek Barnett and traded for Michael Bennett who was cheaper and better. It’s certainly not really a knock on Curry, who had his best professional season during the Eagles’ Super Bowl year. 

When Curry signed his five-year, $47.25 million extension in February 2016, he was just two years removed from his nine-sack season and was seen as a much better fit in the 4-3 scheme Jim Schwartz was bringing to town. So the Eagles paid Curry like he was going to play at a Pro Bowl level and it never happened. In that first year, the Eagles tried to peg him in as a starter opposite of Connor Barwin, but Brandon Graham outplayed him. After Barwin was gone, Curry became a starter, but was just good; not great. 

Meanwhile, the two other big contracts handed to Ertz and Johnson have clearly worked out. Cutting Curry really speaks more to the nature of NFL contracts these days than it does to the level of his play. 

Sure, Curry never played to the level of his contract, but the deals for Ertz and Johnson look much better. And unlike Curry, both of them had one year left on their rookie deals when the Eagles tried to gain value in re-signing them early. It’s worked out. 

Ertz was the first of the three to sign his five-year extension. His was worth $42.5 million and as a Pro Bowler in 2017, he’s beginning to outplay it. He’s now the fifth-highest-paid tight end in the league and he’ll continue to drop on that list as he plays out the next four years of that deal. The best part of Ertz’s contract is it wasn’t heavily backloaded, which has allowed the Eagles to restructure with him the last two offseasons to create some cap room. 

The second of the three big five-year extensions based on projections went to Lane Johnson. His deal was worth $56.25 million. Of course, Johnson’s suspension in 2016 was tough, but he rebounded to have an incredible 2017. He’s the highest-paid right tackle in football, but he’s 10th among all offensive tackles, which is a good value. 

Twenty days after Curry signed his deal, Malcolm Jenkins also got a five-year deal, but at that point he had already been a Pro Bowler, so his deal was more based off of production than projection. 

During that entire offseason, every single time Roseman was asked about the moves he made that offseason, he continually said the most important ones were the moves they made to keep their own players. That obviously included the projection deals for Curry, Johnson and Ertz. 

Sure, only two of the three ended up being bargains with tenable contracts. But even Curry was useful during the two years he played of his extension before the Eagles took the out they built into the deal. That’s not a bad hit rate. 

Eagles move on from Vinny Curry

Eagles move on from Vinny Curry

Vinny Curry grew up an Eagles fan in New Jersey and helped bring the first Super Bowl championship to Philadelphia. He’ll always have that.

But the Eagles have released the veteran defensive end.

Even though Curry had his best season in 2017, the five-year extension worth $47.25 million he signed in 2016 became untenable pretty quickly. Curry is still a good player but just wasn’t worth the $11 million cap hit that faced the Eagles in 2018, especially not after the team traded for Pro Bowler Michael Bennett.

"We want to thank Vinny Curry for his contributions to our organization over the last six seasons, including the important role he played in bringing our city its first Super Bowl championship," the Eagles wrote in a statement.

"It's difficult to part ways with a player like Vinny who has made an impact on the field, in the locker room and in the community. We wish Vinny and his family all the best moving forward."

Even before Bennett came into the picture, the Eagles had last year’s first-round pick, Derek Barnett, waiting for his opportunity to start. Either way, Curry has always seemed like the odd man out.

Cutting Curry will save the Eagles $5 million in salary cap space, with $6 million in dead money — the final three years of prorated signing bonus money.

Earlier in the week, the Eagles unsurprisingly asked Curry to restructure his contract, so a move was somewhat expected. The Eagles very likely tried to trade Curry first.  

Curry, 29, finally got a chance to be a starter in 2017 and started all 16 games. In a reversal from his earlier years with the Eagles, Curry became a first- and second-down player this past season and showed an impressive ability to run-stuff. He used to be a pass-rusher who would take the field on third downs.

When Curry signed his big extension, it was a projection of what the Eagles hoped he could become. In 2014, he had nine sacks in a limited role, but he hasn’t had more than 3½ in any of the three seasons since.

The Eagles used a second-round pick on Curry when he came out of Marshall in 2012. In his six seasons with the Eagles, he had 22 sacks and five forced fumbles.