Eagles

Eagles Notes: Carson Wentz tuning out national praise

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Eagles Notes: Carson Wentz tuning out national praise

It just so happens the best stretch of Carson Wentz's young career has coincided with two nationally televised games. 

So as Wentz took down Carolina on Thursday Night Football and Washington on Monday Night Football, the entire country got to see him look like the best quarterback in football. 

It's in part why he has been vaulted into the forefront of the NFL MVP discussion and why his jersey is selling better than anyone else's in the league. Pundits and talk-show hosts around the country have created much ballyhoo around the Eagles' quarterback. 

For a guy who tries to limit his exposure to publicity, good or bad, this could be problematic. 

So, is it getting any harder to tune out the praise? 

"Not really," Wentz said this week. "Just the nature of the flow of the season and how quickly you have to turn and go on to the next. Plus, I've always just been wired that way. Just block out as much as I can to stay focused. Can't get too high, can't get too low and just keep on grinding." 

Wentz doesn't watch TV and he tries to avoid reading about himself, but it's obviously somewhat unavoidable and will become increasingly so. At least for now, Wentz has been able to shield himself as much as possible. 

He said he's focused on the 49ers and it's easy to believe him. 

"You turn on the tape and you wouldn't think that's an 0-7 football team," Wentz said (see 5 matchups to watch).

Playing with Hart
Before the Eagles signed him this week to offer them some depth at tackle, Taylor Hart had spent the last couple months in California waiting and hoping another opportunity would present itself. 

That happened when Jason Peters went down for the season Monday night. 

After Hart was released by the Eagles at final cuts, he found himself in a precarious situation. Had the Eagles kept one more lineman, he would have been the guy. But after making the conversion from defensive tackle to offensive tackle, no teams other than the Eagles were willing to give him a chance, especially because he didn't have any practice squad eligibility left. 

Still, Hart thinks he made the right decision switching to the offensive line last spring.

"Yeah, I think so," Hart said. "I'm fully invested in it. It was tough being at home for a while, but I'm going to stick with it and try to prove myself with it."

About twice a week for the past couple months, Hart had been working with seven-time Pro Bowler Jackie Slater, who played for the Rams for 20 years before retiring after 1995. 

Hart and Slater worked on technique drills and Hart tried to work on both the offensive tackle and guard positions. The only thing he was missing was NFL competition. That's no small thing. 

"That's the biggest adjustment that I have to do here," Hart said. "You just have to work on your technique when you're away and just keep staying in shape." 

First-game jitters
Coming into Monday, Eagles linebacker Nate Gerry wasn't even sure he was going to be active. After all, he had just been called up from the practice squad after Chris Maragos went down for the year. 

But as the day went on, and because of Mychal Kendricks' hamstring injury, Gerry's role kept increasing and increasing. He ended up playing 15 special teams snaps in the win over Washington. 

And he was on the field for the very first play. At least he thought he was. 

Sitting by himself well after the end of the game, Gerry's whole day had been a blur. So much so that he thought he was on the field for the first snap of the game. He was on the field for the first kick return. The Eagles deferred Monday night. 

"Oh you're right, you're right," he said laughing. "I thought it was."

Gerry said he had been working to stay ready while he was on the practice squad and going against the Eagles' O-line and Wentz every day helped. 

He might have more opportunities coming — "just one ankle sprain away," he said — but for now, he was pretty happy to just experience his first NFL game.  

"It was a pretty cool experience for myself and all my family and all the people back home," he said. "Not a lot of South Dakota kids get to suit up for an NFL game so I had a lot of pride in doing that."

Quote of the Week I
"It ain't like basketball where I can go out and score 40 every night." — Alshon Jeffery on his lack of big numbers 

Quote of the Week II
"That worked out well. He needs to bring more plays from North Dakota State." — Corey Clement on the TD play from Monday

Quote of the Week III
"I thought, shoot, DeMeco could probably go back to Alabama and be the AD. That's how much weight his name carried." — Fletcher Cox on former teammate DeMeco Ryans

Random media guide note
Vinny Curry's favorite Halloween costume is The Ultimate Warrior.

Movie about former Eagle's life in the works

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Movie about former Eagle's life in the works

Pretty soon, you'll be able to see Jon Dorenbos' incredible story on the big screen. 

Producer and Philly native Mike Tollin, thanks to the Eagles' Super Bowl win, is fast-tracking a movie about Dorenbos' life, according to Deadline Hollywood. 

Tollin has been involved other sports films such as Summer Catch, Radio and Coach Carter.

This movie, which will be based on a book Dorenbos is writing with Larry Platt, will be based around Dorenbos' story back to when he used his magic as a coping mechanism to deal with childhood tragedy. 

For those who don't know his story, Dorenbos was just 12 years old when his father murdered his mother. Long before he became a professional long-snapper for the Eagles, Dorenbos used magic as an escape from reality. He continues to perform magic and was a hit on America's Got Talent.

Dorenbos, 37, played 11 seasons in Philadelphia before he was traded to the Saints last offseason. Upon his arrival in New Orleans, doctors found an aortic aneurysm. That ended his football career and sent him for open-heart surgery. 

Even though he wasn't a part of the roster, Dorenbos was included during the Eagles' playoff run. He was in Minnesota when the Birds won the Super Bowl, he paraded down Broad Street, and he's getting a Super Bowl ring. 

"Jon and I have been talking about this for a while, and I once told him we needed a third act, but I didn't mean nearly killing himself," Tollin told Deadline. "This is about overcoming obstacles and turning tragedies into positives and the story is so unlikely that I thought we'd need a coda to say the story was true. We have that, with Jon and the beautiful wife he just married, Annalise, in the parade with confetti falling on their heads."

Dorenbos told Deadline that going with Tollin, whom he has known for a while, was an easy decision and he sold him the book option for $1. 

There's no release date yet, but because of the recency of the Super Bowl win, the plan is to fast-track the movie. Tollin said the plan is to have the movie out by the time the Eagles are starting to defend their title in next year's playoffs. He said he's already talking to an A-list star about the project. 

"I have learned that the sooner you accept your reality, the sooner you can look at the positives in life," Dorenbos told Deadline. "My reality was that I lost both of my parents. My dad went to prison and my mom was killed. My sister and I stayed with a temporary foster family for a bit, until my aunt, my mom's sister, got custody of us. I loved magic. It was really the only time that I didn't think about all the crap, the counseling therapy, the grieving. I would sit at a table, shuffle cards and learn moves, for 10 hours at a time. As a kid, it taught me it was OK to be alone and work toward something. 

"I am a slow, pudgy white guy who never thought he would play football. I made two Pro Bowls and guess what? All I did was stay on the path and show up every day when others jumped off the path."

Lane Johnson doubles down on comments about the Patriot Way

Lane Johnson doubles down on comments about the Patriot Way

Lane Johnson isn't backing down.

In a return appearance on the Pardon My Take podcast, the Eagles' right tackle doubled down on his recent assessment of the Patriot Way.

"I think a lot of guys just wanna be happy playing football. ... The Patriots, they obviously won five Super Bowls. So it's the Patriot Way to win the Super Bowl," Johnson said. "Does that mean that everybody has to act the same way, do the same thing? Is that necessarily the guidelines to win the Super Bowl?"

In Johnson's first appearance on the podcast, he called the Patriot Way a "fear-based organization" and questioned whether players actually have fun during their time in New England, even amid the historic success. Those comments caused a stir, most notably from former Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi, who clapped back at Johnson's comments in multiple appearances on ESPN.

Johnson then responded on Twitter by calling Bruschi "a company man." On the podcast, Johnson followed up on ex-Patriots disagreeing with his comments by inferring that they aren't telling the real truth about their time in New England. 

"Well they kept interviewing ex-Patriots players, what do you think they're gonna say? 'I hated it there? No, I won Super Bowls. We had a great time.' They're not gonna bad-mouth their coach," Johnson said. "They're not gonna say what they really want to say. Do you think that's gonna happen? Hell no, it's not gonna happen."

Johnson not only upset an ex-Patriot with his comments but their fans as well. 

"And I just pissed in everybody's Cheerios and everybody in Boston," Johnson said. "Hey, I got hate mail I still haven't read. I'm looking forward to reading it."

Johnson's full appearance on the podcast can be heard here via Barstool Sports. Johnson joins the podcast about 59 minutes in.