Eagles

NFL Notes: Union seeks to block ruling so Ezekiel Elliott can play

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NFL Notes: Union seeks to block ruling so Ezekiel Elliott can play

NEW YORK -- The union for NFL players has turned to a federal appeals court in its quest to let Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott play Sunday at home against Kansas City as he fights his six-game suspension over domestic violence allegations.

Union lawyers say Elliott's suspension should be delayed until the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals considers the issue. League lawyers had no immediate comment.

The NFL Players Association first asked U.S. District Judge Katherine Polk Failla to suspend her Monday ruling reinstating the suspension during an appeal. But she refused Tuesday, so the file was moved to the appeals court.

The 22-year-old Elliott was suspended in August after the league investigated several alleged physical confrontations in the summer of 2016 with his then-girlfriend (see full story).

Bills: Benjamin acquired in trade with Panthers
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -- The Buffalo Bills' best start to a season in six years just got a little better.

General manager Brandon Beane reinforced his team's patchwork group of receivers by acquiring Kelvin Benjamin in a trade with the Carolina Panthers on Tuesday that was completed just before the trade deadline struck. In exchange, Carolina acquired Buffalo's third- and seventh-round picks in next year's draft.

For the Bills (5-2), Benjamin provides a boost to a team off to a better-than-expected start after Buffalo spent much of the offseason overhauling its roster. And his addition reverses a trend in which general manager Brandon Beane spent much of the past three months trading away talent to stockpile draft picks to rebuild a team in the midst of a 17-year playoff drought.

Receiver Sammy Watkins was traded to the Los Angeles Rams and cornerback Ronald Darby dealt to Philadelphia in separate trades made on the same day in August. Then, on Friday, Buffalo's top-paid player, defensive tackle Marcell Dareus , was dealt to Jacksonville (see full story).

Giants: Jenkins suspended for violation of team rules
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- New York Giants cornerback Janoris Jenkins has been suspended indefinitely for a violation of team rules.

The suspension takes effect immediately, meaning Jenkins will miss Sunday's home game against the Rams.

Jenkins was told Tuesday he was suspended. Coach Ben McAdoo said he will review the status of the suspension next week.

Jenkins is the second Giants cornerback to be suspended this month. Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie was suspended on Oct. 10 after he left the team's facilities before a practice. Rodgers-Cromartie missed the team's Oct. 15 game at Denver, where the Giants won 23-10. He returned to the team the following week.

The Giants returned to practice Monday after their bye week and Jenkins wasn't with them. McAdoo said he had been excused for personal reasons (see full story).

NFL fines Carson Wentz for low hit on DeMarcus Lawrence

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NFL fines Carson Wentz for low hit on DeMarcus Lawrence

Carson Wentz helped the Eagles pick up another big win last Sunday, but his wallet is a little lighter after it. 

Wentz was fined $9,115 for a low hit on Cowboys defensive end DeMarcus Lawrence in the fourth quarter Sunday. 

The low block came after Zach Ertz fumbled the ball before he crossed the goal line on a two-point conversion attempt. The Cowboys recovered the ball and started to return it the other way. Wentz was trying to tackle Justin Durant, who was returning the ball, but Lawrence got in his way and the Eagles' quarterback went low. 

The Eagles went for two-point conversions after all four of their second-half touchdowns because kicker Jake Elliott was concussed. This was the only one they didn't convert. 

Eagles' run defense faces toughest test yet vs. Bears' attack

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Eagles' run defense faces toughest test yet vs. Bears' attack

The Eagles may boast the No. 1 run defense in the NFL these days, but that ranking will be put to the test Sunday by the Chicago Bears (see matchups to watch).

“If we can’t stop the run, it’s going to be a long day,” Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins said this week. “Let’s not get that mistaken.”

Few teams are as committed to the ground attack as the Bears, and even fewer are more productive. Since rookie quarterback Mitchell Trubisky became the starter in Week 5, Chicago ranks seventh in the league in rushing attempts. For the entire 2017 season, the offense is fifth with 131.8 rushing yards per game.

The Eagles are limiting opponents to nearly half that total at 71.0 yards per game. They’ve also faced only a smattering of backfields as talented as Chicago’s, if any. Plus, many offenses have abandoned the run — a strategy the Bears aren’t likely to attempt regardless of the score.

“We know they’re going to run the football,” Eagles linebacker Nigel Bradham said. “They even run the football a lot of times on third-and-long. It’s something they’re going to do.

“There’s a reason why they’re fifth in the league in rushing.”

Given the nature of their passing attack, the Bears’ best shot at pulling off an upset at Lincoln Financial Field is to keep the Eagles' offense on the sideline.

“Even if it’s not getting you a whole lot," Jenkins said, "if you can slowly move the chains and control the game, I think that’s something that they’ll continue to do.”

Trubisky, selected with the second-overall pick in the draft, has begun making strides in recent weeks. He completed 60.0 percent of his passes and avoided throwing an interception in each of the last two games, both one-possession losses. In fact, the Bears haven’t lost any of Trubisky’s six starts by more than eight points, and are 2-4 since he’s taken over.

Trubisky wasn’t asked to throw the ball much in those two victories, either — a combined total of 23 pass attempts. Instead, Chicago was able to lean on running backs Jordan Howard and Tarik Cohen.

“It’s kind of like a thunder and lightning situation," Bradham said, "kind of what we had here at the beginning of the season with (LeGarrette Blount) and (Darren Sproles).”

Howard is the workhorse back and is often overlooked as one of the NFL’s bright, young stars due to the quality of his team. The 23-year-old was the runner-up to the rushing champion as a rookie in 2016 with 1,313 yards. Ten games into his second season, he’s up to 841 yards with a 4.4 average and five touchdowns.

A fourth-round pick from FCS school North Carolina AT&T in 2017, Cohen has immediately emerged as one of the league’s scariest change-of-pace/receiving backs. The 5-foot-6, 181-pound ball carrier has 537 total yards from scrimmage and leads the team with 33 receptions.

The duo is featured prominently in just about everything the Bears do on offense.

“They put both backs on the field at the same time a little bit, too,” Eagles defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz said. “Sometimes it's two-back sets, sometimes it's one.

“Traditionally there's a fullback back there in two-back sets, but not so much with the Bears. They can put two guys back there. It spreads you a little bit thin. You have to be very assignment-sound. It'll test us in the run game.”

Cohen, in particular, has caused defenses some problems because, much like Sproles for the Eagles, he can line up all over the formation. Some teams have even opted to roll coverages to his area of the field, though that might be as much about Chicago’s dearth of receivers as it is respect for the 22-year-old.

Whatever the case, Jenkins doesn’t expect the Eagles to roll coverages, adding that’s not something they’ve done all season. Regardless, with three run or pass plays of 35 yards or more this season, Cohen is a home run threat — although the Eagles aren't giving up many home runs (see story).

“He’s definitely a matchup issue, and they put him all over the place,” Jenkins said. “He’s at receiver, he’s in the backfield, he’s in the slot. Everybody is going to have to hold up. Whether he’s on a linebacker or a safety or a corner, we’ve seen him make plays at every position.

“He’s running post routes on corners and making the play. Then they’re able to line up and run the ball at pretty much anybody, so we’ll have our hands full with that.”

Howard is a threat to rip off long gains on the ground as well, with three runs of 50 and over. Then Trubisky is capable of taking off, too, with 163 yards rushing.

“His ability to make plays with his legs has been a positive,” Jenkins said. “He’s a mobile guy. When all else fails, he can escape the pocket and extend the play.

“Whether it’s scrambling for a first down, or scrambling to get somebody open, that’s always tough on the defense.”

Up until last week, it was beginning to look like there may not have been a running game in the league that the Eagles needed to fear. Then the Dallas Cowboys posted 112 yards last Sunday — tied for the most the Eagles have allowed all season and the most since Week 2. And Dallas was without All-Pro running back Ezekiel Elliott, who is suspended.

Then again, if the Bears are only able to muster 112 yards rushing this week, the Eagles might consider that a victory in itself.

To put those numbers in perspective, exactly half of the league is allowing more than 112.0 yards rushing per game this season. In other words, the Bears are probably going to have to fare a lot better than that to knock off the Eagles.

“I think we set that bar awful high,” Schwartz said. “Some people might get a pat on the back for that.

“It's a tribute to the players in the locker room that that's a poor performance for them, and they consider it a poor performance.”