76ers

Sixers prepared to move forward without Markelle Fultz at summer league

Sixers prepared to move forward without Markelle Fultz at summer league

Updated 2:49 p.m.

LAS VEGAS -- The Sixers are prepared to move forward in summer league if Markelle Fultz cannot play. After all, they aren’t strangers to injured rookies.

Fultz suffered a left ankle sprain in the third quarter of Saturday’s 95-93 win over the Warriors (see Instant Replay). He stepped on the back of Jabari Brown’s foot as he attempted to chase down a block and had to be helped off the court by his teammates without putting pressure on his foot.

Fultz's X-rays came back negative, revealing a lateral ankle sprain (see story). The No. 1 overall pick will miss the remainder of the summer league and is facing a 1-2 week recovery.

Seeing Fultz grabbing his ankle on the court was a visual reminder of the long list of injuries endured by Sixers before even playing an NBA game. Even the slightest wince or hobble is jarring for many to see at this point. 

Nerlens Noel sat out his rookie season because of an ACL injury. Joel Embiid missed two years because of foot surgeries. Just last October, Ben Simmons was hit by a season-ending Jones fracture in his right foot. 

“Any sport you play in in a competitive atmosphere and you’re athletic and moving around, that’s just the challenge,” assistant coach Lloyd Pierce said. “It’s easy to put that on the history of what we’ve gone through, but no, it’s just part of the game. It’s part of the sport.”

Fultz began receiving treatment Saturday night (he was not available to speak to media because of this). Pierce said this will be a lesson for Fultz to learn about taking care of his body to recover from an injury. 

The Sixers plan to go with Larry Drew II more often without Fultz and Timothe Luwawu Cabarrot. Luwawu-Cabarrot also left Saturday's game with an upper lip laceration that required stitches. Drew II hit the go-ahead basket in their victory. Aaron Harrison also drew praise from Pierce for scoring 13 points in as many minutes off the bench. 

“Next guy up,” Pierce said. “We’ve got a lot of bodies and a lot of guys that did not play tonight will get their opportunity at some point during the week.” 

Joel Embiid doesn't want Sixers to end up like OKC

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AP Images

Joel Embiid doesn't want Sixers to end up like OKC

Joel Embiid doesn't want the Sixers to end up like the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Not the 2017-18 Thunder, but OKC circa 2011-12.

Embiid is convinced that at some point soon, the media will turn on him and the Sixers. 

Speaking specifically about the core trio of Embiid, Ben Simmons and Markelle Fultz, Embiid told ESPN's Ramona Shelburne:

"I think with everything, the main thing we have to do is just stay together because I feel like there's going to be some type of situation where people say who is better between us three. And that's how it splits."

Shelburne, who wrote a long and interesting feature on Embiid this week, told more of the story Wednesday on Zach Lowe's podcast.

She recalled talking to Embiid about his social media presence at All-Star weekend in 2016, when he told her, "I'm just trying to have as much fun before everybody turns on me."

Shelburne pointed out the uniqueness of a then-22-year-old — who had been in the United States just seven years — understanding the "fame cycle" well enough to know that things could soon turn.

"I saw what happened in Oklahoma City with (James) Harden, (Russell) Westbrook and (Kevin) Durant and I don't want that to happen here," Shelburne recalled Embiid saying.

If the Sixers get to that point ... it'll probably be a good problem to have. Just prior to the 2012-13 season, the Thunder traded Harden to Houston in one of the worst trades in recent NBA history. OKC did it for several reasons — salary cap, personalities, only having enough shots to go around. And really, who knows if Harden would have been able to grow into this superstar had he been sharing the ball the next handful of seasons with two other alphas?

Embiid and Fultz have already grown close, and it's important to Embiid that the three young Sixers don't get caught up in the "Who takes the last shot?" conversations or "Who should be the All-Star" questions that inevitably come up. 

Luckily for the Sixers, Embiid, Simmons and Fultz have different enough skill sets that they should be able to coexist. It's not directly analogous to the OKC situation where all three players needed the ball in their hands. The Sixers were built this way for a reason. 

Right now, it's clear Embiid is the alpha of the group. He's the go-to guy in crunch time and again has a top-five usage rate. When Simmons eventually becomes more comfortable with his jump shot and Fultz finally makes his impact on the court, we'll see whether or not Embiid was prescient.

Joel Embiid puts back pain aside to get Sixers 'needed' OT win

Joel Embiid puts back pain aside to get Sixers 'needed' OT win

BOX SCORE

MINNEAPOLIS — Joel Embiid's presence was arguably the biggest factor in the Sixers’ snapping their four-game losing streak on Tuesday.

The center was especially key in the final two minutes of regulation and in overtime, as the 76ers defeated the Timberwolves, 118-112 (see observations).

Embiid assisted on Ben Simmons' go-ahead dunk with 1:17 remaining in regulation and hit the game-tying free throws with 14 seconds remaining. He then scored seven points in overtime, including a three-pointer that gave the Sixers a seven-point lead with 1:39 to go.

Embiid finished with 28 points and 12 rebounds in 39 minutes (see highlights), despite missing the two previous games in Cleveland and New Orleans with back tightness.

"I would not have expected him to play as well as he played or as many minutes as he played," Sixers coach Brett Brown said. "… He obviously was massive."

Embiid said he didn't feel 100 percent going into Tuesday's game and added that his back was really tight before the game against New Orleans. He said he didn't have the lift during Tuesday's game that he typically does but that he knew his back would get tight while sitting.

"We needed this," he said of the win.

Embiid’s being in the lineup changes how the 76ers' offense operates, rookie Ben Simmons said. Embiid changes the team's spacing but also gives the Sixers an offensive presence in the post.

"You have to find your spot, but it's a big help also," Simmons said.

Simmons finished with just seven points, as Timberwolves wings Jimmy Butler and Andrew Wiggins guarded him most of the night. However, the rookie was key down the stretch as he scored all seven points in the final 6:17 of regulation and overtime (see highlights).

Brown noted how Simmons ended up with a rating of plus-3 despite the below-average point total. He said he loved that Simmons and Embiid were able to connect for big plays late.

"It wasn't statistically one of his best games," Brown said of Simmons, " … [but] for him to help us get that win on the road, that's a good night."

The win also snapped the Sixers’ recent run of fourth-quarter letdowns. The 76ers trailed by nine with six minutes remaining Tuesday, but they went on a 14-4 run to take a 91-90 lead with 2:17 remaining in regulation. Richaun Holmes completed the run with a three-point play.

Brown said he thought JJ Redick, Simmons and Embiid executed well during that stretch and made note of a three-pointer Redick hit to start the run. 

"To me, that was the tipping point when things started to run," Brown said of the shot.

The coach added that the Sixers will need to cut down on turnovers in order to achieve their goals. The Sixers had a season-high 24, though none came in overtime.