NFL Notes: Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians feels 'great' after cancer scare

NFL Notes: Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians feels 'great' after cancer scare

PHOENIX -- Arizona Cardinals coach Bruce Arians says he is facing the coming season with renewed energy after an offseason cancer scare.

Arians reveals in his new book "The Quarterback Whisperer" that a small spot was detected on his kidney while he was being examined for a hernia problem in December.

He said in the book that the diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma. A small portion of his kidney was removed in February "and now I feel great," he said.

The 64-year-old coach said his energy has returned and he's ready for at least one more season as an NFL coach.

The cancer was found at an early enough stage that Arians' kidney was saved. He told NFL Network that he feels very lucky.

It was Arians' second bout with cancer. He beat prostate cancer in 2007.

Bills: Police release arrest video of Washington
SHARONVILLE, Ohio -- Police in Ohio on Wednesday released cruiser and body cam video of the arrest of Buffalo Bills defensive tackle Adolphus Washington on a weapons charge.

The Cincinnati native and former Ohio State standout is accused of improperly carrying a concealed weapon outside a water park in Sharonville. A police report says officers were breaking up a crowd at the park Sunday night when Washington "reached for and displayed a gun while sitting inside his vehicle, just feet away from officers."

The video shows Washington in his vehicle, with officers surrounding him and shouting at him to "put the gun down."

Washington is later seen in a cruiser with an officer asking him: "Why in the hell would you have that gun in your hands?"

He replied that he was "putting it away."

Washington was processed at the Sharonville Police Department and released that night. Court records do not list an attorney for him (see full story).

Packers: President says GM Thompson doing a great job
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Green Bay Packers president Mark Murphy says general manager Ted Thompson is doing a great job, and the team will have a plan in place whenever he decides to retire or step down.

The 64 year-old Thompson is entering his 13th year as Packers GM. Murphy was asked during a Wednesday conference call about team finances whether there was a succession plan in place for Thompson, who last signed an extension in 2014.

The Packers and Thompson didn't disclose how long he was under contract, though Murphy said it was "multiple years."

Murphy says his first objective is to keep Thompson in place as long as the longtime GM enjoys the work.

The Packers' success has led to other teams hiring away Thompson's assistants.

Cowboys: Team ranked most valuable sports franchise
NEW YORK -- The Dallas Cowboys are worth $4.2 billion, making them the most valuable sports franchise for the second straight year, according to Forbes .

In its annual rankings, Forbes placed the New York Yankees second -- up from fourth a year ago -- with a value of $3.7 billion.

Next are three soccer clubs: Manchester United ($3.69 billion), Barcelona ($3.64) and Real Madrid ($3.58).

The rest of the top 10 includes the New England Patriots ($3.4 billion), New York Knicks ($3.3 billion), New York Giants ($3.1 billion), San Francisco 49ers ($3 billion) and Los Angeles Lakers ($3 billion).

The rankings are based on Forbes' valuations done over the last year for all NFL, NHL, NBA, MLB, soccer, NASCAR and Formula One teams.

The average current value of the top most valuable teams is $2.5 billion, the highest to date, an increase over last year, when the average value was $2.2 billion.

LeGarrette Blount has found a new home

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LeGarrette Blount has found a new home

A big piece of the Eagles’ 2017 Super Bowl season is moving on. 

Running Back LeGarrette Blount has signed with the Detroit Lions. Blount's deal will be for one-year, $4.5 million, according to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport

Blount, 31, was scheduled to visit the Lions on Friday and he didn’t leave without a new deal. He’ll reunite with Lions head coach Matt Patricia, who was the defensive coordinator in New England when Blount was there; the familiarity probably helped. 

Last offseason, Blount took his time deciding where he’d land. He didn’t sign with the Eagles until May and his contract was worth around $1 million. He apparently showed enough during 2017 to get a bigger deal this time around. 

After beginning the season as the Eagles’ primary runner, he eventually saw his role diminish after the Birds added Jay Ajayi through a trade. Still, Blount played in all 16 games and rushed for 766 yards during the regular season. More importantly, he had 14 carries for 90 yards and a touchdown in Super Bowl LII. Blount had a rushing touchdown in all three playoff games after having just two during the regular season. 

Perhaps more important than his contributions on the field, it was Blount’s unselfish nature that seemed to rub off on his teammates. When he and Alshon Jeffery were on board with that unselfish mindset, it seemed like the rest of the team followed. 

As recently as late February, Blount indicated he wanted to return to Philadelphia, where he really seemed to fit in the locker room and under running backs coach Duce Staley, whom Blount clearly respects. 

"Obviously I like it a lot there,” Blount said in February on NFL Network. “They like me a lot there. It's a mutual respect and a mutual agreement thing about how we feel about each other. Obviously, you guys know how I feel about the team, the guys; I love those guys.”

While Blount said he wanted to return to Philly, it was unlikely the Eagles could have (or would have) offered him the type of contract he’s getting from the Lions. 

Meanwhile, the Eagles still have Ajayi and Corey Clement under contract from last season. Kenjon Barner is a free agent. The running back position still seems up in the air, but the Eagles have a few months and a draft to figure it out. 

Looking back at trio of Eagles' 2016 extensions

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Looking back at trio of Eagles' 2016 extensions

Back in early 2016, just after Howie Roseman had been reinstated to his post of power, he pulled out some moves from the classic Joe Banner playbook. 

He tried to find value in projection. 

Within a nine-day span in early 2016, the Eagles signed Vinny Curry, Zach Ertz and Lane Johnson to lucrative five-year extensions. Since then, Ertz and Johnson have grown into Pro Bowl players, rendering their contracts relative bargains. 

Curry simply remained a good player, which is why he was cut on Friday afternoon

While Curry finally became a starter in 2017, he had just three sacks and the team drafted Derek Barnett and traded for Michael Bennett who was cheaper and better. It’s certainly not really a knock on Curry, who had his best professional season during the Eagles’ Super Bowl year. 

When Curry signed his five-year, $47.25 million extension in February 2016, he was just two years removed from his nine-sack season and was seen as a much better fit in the 4-3 scheme Jim Schwartz was bringing to town. So the Eagles paid Curry like he was going to play at a Pro Bowl level and it never happened. In that first year, the Eagles tried to peg him in as a starter opposite of Connor Barwin, but Brandon Graham outplayed him. After Barwin was gone, Curry became a starter, but was just good; not great. 

Meanwhile, the two other big contracts handed to Ertz and Johnson have clearly worked out. Cutting Curry really speaks more to the nature of NFL contracts these days than it does to the level of his play. 

Sure, Curry never played to the level of his contract, but the deals for Ertz and Johnson look much better. And unlike Curry, both of them had one year left on their rookie deals when the Eagles tried to gain value in re-signing them early. It’s worked out. 

Ertz was the first of the three to sign his five-year extension. His was worth $42.5 million and as a Pro Bowler in 2017, he’s beginning to outplay it. He’s now the fifth-highest-paid tight end in the league and he’ll continue to drop on that list as he plays out the next four years of that deal. The best part of Ertz’s contract is it wasn’t heavily backloaded, which has allowed the Eagles to restructure with him the last two offseasons to create some cap room. 

The second of the three big five-year extensions based on projections went to Lane Johnson. His deal was worth $56.25 million. Of course, Johnson’s suspension in 2016 was tough, but he rebounded to have an incredible 2017. He’s the highest-paid right tackle in football, but he’s 10th among all offensive tackles, which is a good value. 

Twenty days after Curry signed his deal, Malcolm Jenkins also got a five-year deal, but at that point he had already been a Pro Bowler, so his deal was more based off of production than projection. 

During that entire offseason, every single time Roseman was asked about the moves he made that offseason, he continually said the most important ones were the moves they made to keep their own players. That obviously included the projection deals for Curry, Johnson and Ertz. 

Sure, only two of the three ended up being bargains with tenable contracts. But even Curry was useful during the two years he played of his extension before the Eagles took the out they built into the deal. That’s not a bad hit rate.