Flyers

After offseason, Flyers loaded with captain savvy

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After offseason, Flyers loaded with captain savvy

If inexperience was a problem for last year’s Flyers, it shouldn’t be this time around.

Never mind the understanding Claude Giroux now has of what it takes to be the Flyers’ captain -- though that will certainly help. Thanks to GM Paul Holmgren’s offseason moves, Giroux has two new teammates who also wore the "C" last year, as well as a new goaltender who already knows what it takes to play in Philadelphia.

Those new additions will more than make up for the supposed excess of youth (and lack of veteran leadership) on last season’s team.

“Having guys like Vinny Lecavalier and Mark Streit come in, they've been captains in the league and they are good leaders,” Giroux said. “A guy like Ray Emery has been around the league for a while. To have guys like that come in and help the young guys -- and help me -- it's obviously a real good thing for us.”

The Flyers bought out alternate captain Danny Briere’s contract over the summer, and with him they lost a veteran well known for his off-ice influence. Briere mentored and even hosted Giroux and Sean Couturier in his home when they were new to the team, was captain of the Buffalo Sabres before he came to Philadelphia, and wore the "A" on his jersey while he was here.

But, arguably, the Flyers were able to upgrade on the ice while bringing in comparable leadership experience even as they let Briere go. And that’s the idea.

“They were great additions,” Max Talbot said. “You look at the three guys they brought. You have two captains and [two] Stanley Cup winners. All guys with experience and all of them have great attitudes, as well. That is the base. And we know they can all play.”
 
Streit and Lecavalier agreed that having served as captains in the past will help them personally, as well as help the team when there's a need for players besides Giroux, Scott Hartnell and Kimmo Timonen (the latter two will serve as alternates this season) to speak up.

They won't, according to Lecavalier, fade into the background just because they're no longer wearing a letter stitched onto their jerseys.

"I don't really think like that," Lecavalier said.

Instead, he said, he thinks having so many players with leadership experience is "great” for the team.

“When you’re captain, you need a group of guys, you need to help each other out," Lecavalier said. "And of course our leaders, Claude Giroux, and great leadership with Kimmo Timonen and Scott Hartnell and other guys coming up, and obviously Mark Streit, and myself being captain in Tampa -- we’re all going to help out each other and try to lead by example, for sure.”

There are times and places for different players to raise their voices throughout the year, and Giroux will benefit from having others around him who've been through tough times, as well as the best times (like those aforementioned Stanley Cup victories).

As Streit said, "it’s a long season. There’s a lot of ups and downs."

“Experience, leadership, it’s going to help us down the stretch,” Streit said. “For me, it was a great experience being captain for two years. I learned a lot.

"The [Flyers'] guys are all great, it’s a great room, and I think that’s really important, to have great chemistry. And I can tell -- I’ve been here for a few days and already feel comfortable. It made my adjustment really easy.”

Andrew MacDonald out 4-6 weeks with lower-body injury

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AP Images

Andrew MacDonald out 4-6 weeks with lower-body injury

A roster spot for Samuel Morin appears to have opened up.

Andrew MacDonald will miss 4-6 weeks with a lower-body injury, Flyers general manager Ron Hextall announced Sunday. MacDonald will likely land on injured reserve.

The injury likely occurred midway through the third period against the Oilers on Saturday, when MacDonald blocked a Mark Letestu slap shot with 10:48 left in regulation and 1:44 left on an Edmonton power play.

MacDonald hobbled around on basically on one leg before being able to clear the puck and make it to the bench after 44 seconds. MacDonald blocked a game-high six shots Saturday.

“You just got to get up,” MacDonald said after the Flyers’ 2-1 win. “If you don’t get up, it’s 5-on-3. There are other opportunities that can arise from it. Do your best and try to hang in there. Wait for some help. Wait until you clear it. Everyone battles through it.

“You take a shot. You just get up, get back in there and help your guys.”

With MacDonald injured, the Flyers now have six defensemen. Brandon Manning has been a healthy scratch the past two games as Travis Sanheim drew back into the lineup.

The Flyers have yet to make a corresponding roster move, but considering Morin nearly made the team out of training camp and hung around for the four-game season-opening West Coast trip, it’s a safe assumption that Morin will find his way back to the NHL.

Morin had a goal and an assist for the Phantoms on Saturday night, an assist Friday night and points in all his three games in Lehigh Valley.

If Morin does come back up, the question is will he play?

The Flyers were reluctant to play three rookie defensemen on their season-opening trip and scratched both Sanheim and Morin for the season opener.

Things have changed now, though. MacDonald is third on the Flyers in ice time, averaging 19:36 while playing with Ivan Provorov, who will now find himself with a new partner.

Dave Hakstol could insert Manning into the lineup, which is a strong possibility. How Hakstol draws up his pairings remains to be seen, though it’s unlikely he’ll break up Shayne Gostisbehere and rookie Robert Hagg. It’s possible Provorov finds himself with Manning or Morin, or perhaps Radko Gudas. We’ll know more after Monday’s practice.

Calling up Morin is not Hextall’s only option. The Flyers also have T.J. Brennan in the AHL, who is a better fit as a seventh defenseman.

Scott Laughton credits longtime skating coach Dawn Braid for NHL rebirth

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Scott Laughton credits longtime skating coach Dawn Braid for NHL rebirth

After spending nearly the entire 2016-17 campaign at Lehigh Valley, Flyers center Scott Laughton looks like a whole different player this season. But the demotion and time spent in the minor leagues aren’t the only reasons behind his NHL rebirth.

Laughton also became a far better skater.

Through eight games, Laughton has two goals and one assist with a plus-one rating – hardly the kind of numbers that typically garner a lot of attention. However, the former first-pick is centering a quality fourth line for the Flyers, a grouping that has been strong in its own end while also generating impressive offensive opportunities at the other. Laughton leads the club’s forwards in shorthanded time on ice as well, playing a huge role in a penalty-killing unit that’s managed to ward off all but one of the last 13 power plays it’s faced.

The difference is apparent, and Laughton knows it, too. Some of that comes with age and experience – he’s only 23, with 117 NHL games under his belt. Yet Laughton directs much of the credit for his growth on the ice to his longtime skating coach, Dawn Braid.

“Worked with the same skating coach I have been for the last six, seven years,” Laughton said Friday of his offseason regimen. “She actually just got hired with Arizona. She was a skating coach there.

“I've been working with her. I did a lot of tight edges, a lot of tight work, and I did a lot of crossovers to try and develop speed. I think everything kind of comes together though — your off-ice training combined with that — and just getting stronger as I get older. I'm getting older and coming into my body.”

A former figure skater, Braid was named the Coyotes' skating coach in August of 2016, become the NHL’s first full-time female coach in the process. From the sound of things, the hiring was long overdue.

Braid had built a following around the league, and from players vastly more acclaimed than Laughton.

“She works with (Islanders center and four-time All-Star) John Tavares and helped him,” Laughton said. “She's got (Stars center Jason Spezza). She's got a bunch of guys. A lot of guys go to her. She's like Barb Underhill in Toronto. They were partners.

“I've been skating with her since I was in first year of juniors, so I really like her.”

It sounds like Laughton is getting an education in more than how to be better on his skates. As Braid has worked with more NHL stars and teams, she’s began teaching more than just being quicker and more fluid on the ice.

There are applicable hockey lessons and techniques involved in their training.

“I think she's really incorporated puck work,” Laughton said. “It used to be no pucks. She watches game film and things like that, and sees what's going on in the game and tries to help you that way.”

Whatever Laughton is doing, it appears to be working. A year ago, he couldn’t crack the Flyers’ main roster, managing to appear in just two games. He finished with 19 goals, 20 assists and a plus-17 rating in 60 games for the Phantoms in 16-17, with an additional two goals and one assists in five playoff tilts. Despite finishing with a 39-33-10 record and missing the postseason, the big club never felt as though Laughton was needed.

It’s early into the 17-18 campaign, but it’s already difficult to imagine this Flyers squad without Laughton’s contributions – so give the assist to Baird on this one.