Phillies

After decade in Boston, Clay Buchholz is energized for new chapter with Phillies

After decade in Boston, Clay Buchholz is energized for new chapter with Phillies

CLEARWATER, Fla. – It’s not easy leaving a team that is loaded for World Series bear for a rebuilding club that would consider a .500 season to be a fist-pumping success.

That’s what has happened to Clay Buchholz.

One day this winter he was part of a Boston Red Sox club that probably became the team to beat in the American League when it acquired stud lefty Chris Sale from the Chicago White Sox in a December trade. Two weeks later, Buchholz was traded to the Phillies.

Truth be told, the righty didn’t expect to be part of the Red Sox’s World Series push in 2017.

He had a feeling he’d be traded this winter.

“I thought the [Sale deal] would have been the trade I would be a part of,” he said before his first workout with the Phillies on Tuesday.

Buchholz, 32, spent 10 seasons in Boston. He threw a no-hitter in his second big-league start, made two All-Star teams and won a World Series ring in 2013. He battled inconsistency in recent seasons and teetered in and out of Boston’s rotation in 2016. The Sox picked up the $13.5 million option on his contract after last season with the idea that some team might roll the dice that he would be a good bounce-back candidate in his free-agent walk year. The Phillies under general manager Matt Klentak have been willing to gamble on these types of players. The Phils sent minor-league second baseman Josh Tobias, a second-tier prospect, to Boston, assumed all of Buchholz’s salary and the deal was struck.

As much as the Phillies would like to shock the world and become a contender in 2017, they remain a rebuilding team on the prowl for young talent. Deep down inside, Phillies officials are probably hoping that Buchholz will give them four strong months, allowing for a little extra seasoning of their top starting pitching prospects, then bring some young talent in a trade.

Buchholz shrugged when asked about that possibility.

“I've been in trade rumors since 2005 when I got drafted,” he said. “I can't do anything with them regardless if I think about them or don't think about them. All I can do is go out and pitch and prepare and try to stay healthy throughout the season.”

In Philadelphia, Buchholz will work under pitching coach Bob McClure. The two have a familiarity dating to McClure’s time with Boston.

Last season, McClure helped Jake Thompson rebound from a rocky debut and have success by shortening and simplifying his delivery to the point where it was almost a modified stretch. Thompson is going to continue to use it this season.

Buchholz made a similar adjustment with Boston last season and it helped him get back in the rotation in September. He made five starts in the month and went at least six innings without giving up more than two runs in four of them.

“I eliminated a lot of movement I felt I didn't need and I could concentrate on throwing the pitch and throwing it well rather than [thinking about] mechanical flaws or trying to do something a little bit different within the windup,” Buchholz said of the adjustment to his delivery. “I'm coming into camp right now thinking I'm going to stay in the stretch. It worked out good for me.”

Wearing Phillies red before Tuesday morning’s workout, Buchholz said he was ready for a new chapter in his baseball life.

“I think everybody nowadays knows that one player doesn’t stay with one team his whole career,” he said. “There are a select few guys that have done that over their career — I was playing on the same team with one of them, Dustin Pedroia. He’s been a staple there forever.

“But I think a change of scenery for me, just to get somewhere else and meet some new guys and play for a different uniform, a different organization … The Red Sox, they gave me a lot, gave me the opportunity. But this is a new chapter, and I look forward to going on the field with these guys here.

“I think it energizes anybody. There are expectations that are brought back to you. That sense of complacency, being in one spot for an extended period of time, that’s gone. And, yeah, you want to perform for the new faces and show that you’re still good at your craft and good at what you do. I’m coming in here and hoping to definitely impress and help this team win some baseball games."

But there probably won’t be a trip to the postseason in 2017, not with the rebuilding Phillies at least.

“I look at it as an opportunity to prove people wrong,” Buchholz said.

Another old friend joins Phillies' spring coaching staff

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Another old friend joins Phillies' spring coaching staff

Another old friend is joining the Phillies' coaching staff as a guest instructor in Clearwater this spring.

Bobby Abreu will make his coaching debut, while Larry Bowa, Brad Lidge, Charlie Manuel, Dan Plesac and Mike Schmidt will all be back to assist in spring training.

Gabe Kapler has a lot of experience on his side as he prepares for his first camp as a major-league manager.

Abreu was a polarizing player in these parts, drawing criticism from fans for a perceived lack of hustle and not nearly enough praise for hitting .303/.416/.513 in his nine seasons with the Phils. He was one of the most complete players in the game during his peak from 1998 to 2006.

The Phillies' first workout with pitchers and catchers is Feb. 14 in Clearwater. Full-squad workouts begin Feb. 19.

Big rise, big fall for Phillies prospects on Baseball America list

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Big rise, big fall for Phillies prospects on Baseball America list

Baseball America is out this week with its annual ranking of what it considers the top 100 prospects in the game.

The always interesting list offers a glimpse at just how fickle the ranking of prospects can be.

J.P. Crawford, who will take over at shortstop for the Phillies in the coming season, ranks 16th on the list, not far off from his standing as BA's 19th-ranked prospect a year ago, but dramatically higher than No. 92. That's where he was on BA's midseason list in July. Crawford had slipped that far after a poor first half. He recovered in the second half, played in the majors in September and ascended to the starting shortstop job after Freddy Galvis was traded in December. Now, he finds himself in better standing with BA.

The Phillies are well represented with five players on BA's list. Atlanta leads the way with eight players. Milwaukee, San Diego, Tampa Bay and the New York Yankees have six each.

After Crawford, the Phillies come in at No. 25 with right-handed pitcher Sixto Sanchez, No. 31 with second baseman Scott Kingery, No. 84 with right-handed pitcher Adonis Medina, and No. 100 with outfielder Adam Haseley.

Sanchez, 19, is a power-armed strike thrower who projects to pitch at High A Clearwater with a good chance to get to Double A Reading in 2018.

Kingery, 23, projects as the Phillies' second baseman of the future. He will be in major-league spring-training camp but is expected to return to Triple A for at least a couple of months before arriving in the majors sometime in 2018.

Medina, 21, is another power arm. He is expected to open at Clearwater.

Haseley, 21, was the Phillies' top pick in last year's draft. He was selected eighth overall out of the University of Virginia. He has strong on-base skills and projects to open the season at Clearwater, as well.

Notably absent from Baseball America's ranking is Mickey Moniak. The 19-year-old outfielder was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2016 draft. He ranked 46th on the list a year ago, but struggled in his first pro season, hitting just .236 with a .284 on-base percentage in 123 games at Low A Lakewood, and dropped off the list. 

Phillies officials remain high on Moniak and he has plenty of time to climb the list. Nonetheless, third baseman Nick Senzel, picked by Cincinnati with the second pick in 2016 draft, one spot behind Moniak, ranks No. 7 on BA's list. 

Braves' outfielder prospect Ronald Acuna is No. 1.