Phillies

Clay Buchholz is embracing leadership role on young Phillies' staff

Clay Buchholz is embracing leadership role on young Phillies' staff

CLEARWATER, Fla. -- At age 32 and with 10 years of big-league service time, Clay Buchholz is the elder statesman of the Phillies' starting pitching staff.

The distinction comes with a responsibility to lead and Buchholz is ready for that role.

"It comes with the territory," the right-hander said after his second start of the spring with his new club Sunday (see story). "If you're lucky enough to be around the big leagues for an extended period of time you know what you have to do. I'm looking forward to it."

The Phillies acquired Buchholz in a December trade with the Boston Red Sox. Three weeks into his first camp with the Phils, Buchholz has been impressed with some of the young arms he now shares a clubhouse with.

He mentioned Vince Velasquez, in particular.

"I like Velasquez," Buchholz said. "That's who I've played catch with every day since I got here. Just watching him on TV over the last few years, he's got electric stuff. If he can learn how to harness it all … Stuff plays at the major-league level if you command it.

"That's with all the kids coming up now throwing 100 miles per hour. There are some arms coming up around the league that are just electric and I think Vinny is one of those guys who could open a lot of eyes this year."

Buchholz described what it's like to simply play catch with Velasquez, who had a 16-strikeout game last season.

"You see how the ball comes out of his hand, the backspin, the movement, and he's not even trying to make it move, that's just the way it comes out of his hand," Buchholz said. "That's when you've got something special."

Buchholz hopes to impart on Velasquez and others some of the lessons that he learned over his 10 seasons in the baseball cauldron that is Boston. Buchholz enjoyed the highs of pitching a no-hitter in the second big-league start of his career and the lows of losing his spot in the rotation (he ultimately regained it) a decade later.

Playing under the microscope in Boston taught Buchholz the importance of having a short memory -- the ol' never get too high when things are going well or too low when they're going bad thingy. It also taught him the importance of focus.

"I talk to (Velasquez) every day," Buchholz said. "It's more about coming from an organization where everything is so magnified and you're expected to win every year. From my short time here, it's a little more relaxed than Boston was, even in spring. It's easier to work on things without having to answer a whole lot of questions and dwelling on them and that's what I'm trying to express to these guys: You have to work every day and even if it's relaxed you've got to take it at game speed and that's how you get better."

Velasquez, 24, struck out 10.4 batters per nine innings over 24 starts last season. He is one of three starters 26 and under in the Phillies' rotation, joining 23-year-old Aaron Nola and 26-year-old Jerad Eickhoff.

"It's something different than what I've seen the past nine or 10 years," Buchholz said. "It's always been a big veteran presence and to come into a place where the average age is 24, 25 years old, it's a little different.

"It's fun to be around them, fun to be around a new group of guys. I think this team is headed in the right direction."

Phillies trade Freddy Galvis for pitching prospect

Phillies trade Freddy Galvis for pitching prospect

Updated 12:25 p.m.

The Phillies have been aggressively shopping Freddy Galvis this offseason and they've found a suitor.

The Phils on Friday traded Galvis to the Padres for pitching prospect Enyel De Los Santos.

De Los Santos, 21, was ranked 13th on the Padres’ prospect list by MLB.com.

In the hitter-friendly Texas League (Double A) last season, De Los Santos went 10-6 with a 3.78 ERA, striking out 138 in 150 innings.

The Padres had done extensive homework this offseason on the Phillies' 28-year-old shortstop. Last season, the 71-91 Padres used 33-year-old Erick Aybar at shortstop for the majority of games. San Diego now has a top-notch defender at the game's most important defensive position.

Galvis has been a Gold Glove finalist two years in a row and was probably robbed this season when he committed just seven errors in 637 defensive chances but still lost out to Brandon Crawford.

A free agent at season's end, Galvis has hit .248/.292/.390 the last two seasons with an average of 28 doubles, four triples, 16 homers and 64 RBIs.

The Phillies were known to be looking for pitching in exchange for Galvis, but his trade value wasn't as high as it could've been because of his impending free agency.

J.P. Crawford will step in as the Phillies' everyday shortstop. The soon-to-be-23-year-old Crawford hit .214 with a .356 on-base percentage in 23 games as a rookie in 2017.

Angels' moves hurt Phillies' chances of catching Trout

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Angels' moves hurt Phillies' chances of catching Trout

The Eagles made Angel Stadium in Anaheim their home away from home last week. The entire team was greeted with a gift of a Mike Trout bobblehead. Nigel Bradham even used the Millville native and Birds season ticketholder's locker to dress. Trout left a personalized message to his favorite team prior to the Rams game.

Yet another link that it is kismet for the native son, the best player in his sport, to return someday soon to Philadelphia and play for the team he grew up rooting for? After all, the Phillies are flush with spending money should the opportunity arise. They appear to have the makings of a strong nucleus that could lure the 26-year-old back East. His deal runs through 2020 and Trout would be only 29 at the end of that contract. Seems perfect, right?  

Not so fast, my red pinstriped friends.

Hold on, we'll get to that in one minute. If you've been comatose the last seven seasons, all Trout has done since debuting in the big leagues in 2011 is win two MVPs, finish second in MVP voting three times and make six All-Star Games. The marriage here with the Phillies, a team he was a die-hard fan of growing up — even attending the 2008 World Series Championship parade as a senior in high school — would be one made in heaven. 

Adding fodder to the Trout-to-Philly hype is the Angels have reached the postseason only once in his time there. The hope from a fan's perspective would be Anaheim would continue to languish in mediocrity and eventually be forced to move Trout to possibly begin a rebuild, or he would play out his deal and walk. Wishful thinking? Sure. Out of the question? No. Trout has a full no-trade, so he can pick and choose where he ends up if he wishes to leave Southern California for South Philly prior to the end of his deal.

However, there may be a fly in the ointment. Despite it being only December, the Angels have had themselves an offseason. They signed Japanese two-way phenom Shohei Ohtani. The 23-year-old is a three-pitch starter who can touch over 100 mph on the gun with his fastball. He posted a 1.86 ERA in 140 innings for his Nippon-Ham club in Japan's Pacific League, a very high level of baseball. He also batted .322 with a .416 on-base percentage, while slugging .588 last season. In 2016, he hit 22 home runs. This was a major coup for the Angels, who won a bidding war over many other suitors around the league to land the right-handed pitching, left-handed hitting Ohtani.  

The Angels also signed veteran second baseman Ian Kinsler, a four-time All-Star and 2016 Gold Glove winner. Despite being 35, Kinsler is a major upgrade from what they had last year at the position. Anaheim also traded for Justin Upton late last year and re-signed him in the offseason. He'll play next to Trout in left. The Angels still need to upgrade their pitching. But on paper, they have the makings of a potent lineup that, with some pitching help, could land a wild-card spot in the playoffs. That is not music to Phillies fans' ears.

We're a long way away from 2020, so a lot can happen both here and 2,376 miles away in Orange County. The Phillies need to hope their current young nucleus blossoms like the group of Rollins, Utley, Howard and Hamels did in the mid-2000s. They should also keep a close eye on their neighbors to the West and cross their fingers things don't go so well. If both scenarios play out in their favor, the Phillies could reel in the biggest fish in franchise history.