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Villanova 'can't hear anything' in wild win inside loud Jake Nevin Field House

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Villanova 'can't hear anything' in wild win inside loud Jake Nevin Field House

BOX SCORE

VILLANOVA, Pa. — Jay Wright has his team’s routine down pat before games at the Pavilion or the Wells Fargo Center.

But ahead of Wednesday’s game at Jake Nevin Field House, the Villanova head coach realized he had forgotten something.

“We didn’t have a pregame meal,” he said. “We’re so used to doing it the way we do it, we missed out on setting it up. We all walked to the cafeteria and ate in the cafeteria with other students."

Wright paused and smiled, an interesting realization setting in.

“That’s probably what everybody always did," he said.

Call it another nostalgic touch in a game filled with them.

Inspired by the ghosts of Villanova past, the Wildcats put on a memorable performance in the program’s first game at Jake Nevin Field House since 1986, rolling to a 90-62 win over Penn (see observations).

But it was only after the final horn sounded and they walked off the court at the old “Cat House” that they could enjoy it. During the game, they couldn’t really do much in the way of talking with each other.

“Wild atmosphere,” Wright said. “It’s a difficult place to play for everybody, including the home team. You can’t hear anything. We legitimately had trouble communicating defensively. … I can’t imagine what that place used to be like when they had more seats in here.”

On Wednesday, there were only about 2,000 fans in the building — Villanova’s home court from 1931 until the Pavilion, now undergoing renovations, was built in 1986 — but almost all of them were students who were standing the whole game, singing in unison during breaks in the action, and erupting after every Villanova bucket.

“It was honestly awesome,” said point guard Jalen Brunson, who led Villanova with 17 points. “It was definitely a great experience. Like Coach said, it was hard to hear sometimes. I tried reading lips. I couldn’t really hear him.”

Redshirt freshman Omari Spellman had similar issues with the noise, saying he had to ask teammate Mikal Bridges “the same question 50 times.” Some of that, of course, was his own doing as his thunderous dunk midway through the first half brought down the house and set the tone as ’Nova began to pull away.

What was he thinking about on that play, as he stole the ball at midcourt and streaked toward the basket?

“Oh, I double-dribbled,” he said. “The ref didn’t call it. I definitely double-dribbled.”

That was one of a few tough breaks for the Quakers, who actually played a decent first half but still went into halftime down 18 points. The game was never close again, although Penn head coach Steve Donahue didn’t point to the atmosphere as a reason for the lopsided defeat.

“It’s not that different, to be quite honest with you,” he said. “It’s very comparable to probably 150 programs in America who play in a similar facility.”

Donahue gave much more credit to the Villanova players, who never took their foot off the gas en route to their 19th straight Big 5 victory.

“Sometimes you watch them on film and you’re slightly underwhelmed because they don’t have crazy talent,” said Donahue, who coached in the ACC with Boston College for four years. “On tape, Villanova doesn’t jump out like other teams. But what’s apparent when you play them is I’ve never coached against a team that’s smarter and tougher and more selfless.”

Wright, who can be critical of his team, admitted his team played really well and that if it didn’t, an improved Penn squad might have been able to keep it close. 

But even though he’s pleased by it, he’s equally baffled by how well the Wildcats have been able to consistently throttle Big 5 opponents over the last five seasons.

“We live here,” he said. “We watch these teams. … We play against each other in the summers. Penn will come to our place in the summer and we’ll go down to Penn. We have great respect for them. We’ll play five games and sometimes Penn will win three out of five.”

He added he doesn’t like to think about the Big 5 streak, which could hit 20 if they can beat archrival St. Joe’s at Hagan Arena on Saturday. The Wildcats then face La Salle at the Wells Fargo Center on Dec. 10 before perhaps their toughest Big 5 game of the season — at Temple on Dec. 13.

Without the benefit of playing any games at the Pavilion, could their city streak end this season?

“I think you’re gonna see three other great games against Villanova,” Donahue said. “I do feel like we want to end that streak. There’s no doubt. 

“I do think Villanova has it going but that being said, I think those three programs could beat them this year because it’s the Big 5 and the kids know each other.”

No. 4 Villanova-Penn observations: Wildcats put on show at the old 'Cat House'

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No. 4 Villanova-Penn observations: Wildcats put on show at the old 'Cat House'

BOX SCORE

VILLANOVA, Pa. — The venue was different but the result the same.

In the first Big 5 game ever played at Jake Nevin Field House, No. 4 Villanova cruised to a 90-62 victory over visiting Penn (5-4) on Wednesday. 

With the win, the Wildcats (7-0) upped their record Big 5 winning streak to 19 games heading into another city matchup at Saint Joseph’s on Saturday. 

• It was a unique atmosphere at Jake Nevin Field House, which hadn’t hosted a Villanova men’s game since 1986, a month before the Pavilion opened next door. But with the 2,200-seat gym best known as the “Cat House” filled with just about all Villanova students, it got loud. Very loud (see story).

• The biggest cheers in the building, which opened in 1931, came early when Omari Spellman had a steal and coasted in for a thunderous one-handed dunk, moments after burying a three-pointer. The Villanova redshirt freshman was up for the game, scoring 10 points before the first media timeout.

• The rims may not be what they’re used to but the Wildcats could barely miss, shooting 50 percent from three-point range and 56.9 percent from the field. One of those threes came from freshman Jermaine Samuels — just his second of the season.

• ’Nova captain Jalen Brunson took over in the second half, as he’s prone to do. He finished with a game-high 17 points and missed only one shot. And showing his leadership, he charged way off the bench to cheer a teammate drawing a charge in the final two minutes.

• Phil Booth, Mikal Bridges and Spellman also had big games with all three finishing with 14 points. Donte DiVincenzo joined them in double figures with 12.

• The visiting Quakers actually seemed up for the unique matchup, too, with standout sophomores AJ Brodeur (15 points) and Ryan Betley (11 points) putting Penn up 11-9 early. But it looked like some nerves caught up with them with a couple of players shooting airballs and getting rattled.

• As Brodeur and Betley go, so go the Quakers. Brodeur was productive inside but Betley, a native of nearby Downingtown, had an off night shooting until getting hotter late when the game was already out of reach.

• Eric Paschall also had a huge first-half dunk for Villanova — while getting fouled. And Bridges added a couple of his own in the second half, the second of which gave the Wildcats a commanding 74-47 edge with 8:38 remaining.

• Penn took a lot of threes as it usually does but connected on just one of its 10 first-half attempts. For the game, the Quakers shot 6 for 20 from behind the arc.

• Darnell Foreman scored 13 points for Penn and Jackson Donahue, who’s been in and out of the rotation, had a good night off the bench, hitting a couple of threes in the second half and making a couple of nice passes on backdoor cuts. He also endured some taunts from a few Villanova students who liked to call out “Jackson.”  

• Villanova, which held a comfortable 46-28 halftime lead, has beaten Penn in each of the last 15 seasons.

• Legendary Villanova coach Rollie Massimino, who died in August, was honored at halftime with his retired jersey presented to family. About 40 of his former players were in attendance at the old field house he used to call home. 

• The best spotted T-shirt in the crowd: “All Wright All Wright All Wright.”

• After playing Saint Joseph’s, Villanova meets Gonzaga at Madison Square Garden before closing out its Big 5 slate vs. La Salle on Dec. 10 and Temple on Dec. 13. The Wildcats are aiming for their fifth straight perfect Big 5 record.

• The Quakers, who lost an overtime heartbreaker to La Salle earlier in the season, face Temple and St. Joe’s in consecutive weeks in January.

Penn survives Monmouth in its 1st 4OT game since 1920

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Penn survives Monmouth in its 1st 4OT game since 1920

BOX SCORE

WEST LONG BRANCH, N.J. -- Ryan Betley scored 26 points and Antonio Woods scored 23 and Pennsylvania outlasted Monmouth in a four-overtime thriller Saturday night beating the Hawks 101-96.

It was the second four-overtime affair in Penn's history. The first one occurred on March 13, 1920 when Penn beat Princeton 26-23.

The Quakers used a 10-0 run in the final stanza to end the game. Eddie Scott added 21 points and 13 boards for Penn.

Monmouth's Austin Tilghman buried a deep 3 at the horn to force the fourth overtime tied at 89. Tilghman forced the initial overtime when he banked in a runner at the buzzer to knot it at 64. Tilghman finished with 19 points and 12 boards.

Scott threw down a dunk to tie at 78 with eight seconds to go after he gathered Ryan Betley's missed 3-pointer at the end of the second overtime.

Near the end of the first overtime, Woods made a pair of free throws with 36 seconds left to tie it 71. Each team missed a shot for a chance to win.

Monmouth opened an 11-3 lead before the Quakers got hot. With the score tied at 24, Penn went on a 21-7 run over the final 6:28 of the first half and led 45-31 at the break. Pennsylvania (5-3) shot 51.9 percent (14 of 27) in the first half including 7 of 14 from 3-point range.

But Penn went cold, and after Max Rothschild made a pair of free throws with 9:53 left, the Quakers went scoreless over the next four minutes. Monmouth (2-4) used a 9-0 run and cut the deficit to 56-53.