So What's the Deal with Jordan Poyer?

So What's the Deal with Jordan Poyer?

In the event you're a degenerate gambler who sits there and sweats out Pac-12 games at 1 a.m. -- or, you know, if you're just a college football fan -- there's a good chance you were already familiar with Jordan Poyer.

The Oregon State corner was a consensus All-American in 2012 and finished second in the nation with seven interceptions. He was the leader of an Oregon State secondary that helped hold opponents to the third-fewest passing yards per game in an offense-happy conference.

He's even a potential return threat in the NFL.

He was widely projected as a Day 2 or very early Day 3 pick. So how did he manage to fall to the Eagles in the seventh round?

We're now four days after the NFL Draft and that's still a fascinating question.

Poyer had some character concerns -- he was apparently banned from a bar and then later charged with trespassing when he was detained following a fight at that same bar last May -- but guys with his on-field resume have done worse and not slid all the way down the board.

Then there's the fact that his combine was apparently pretty unimpressive -- which Poyer cites as the reason for his fall -- and that his weaknesses from a variety of scouting reports indicated that he lacks strength and speed in coverage. Those traits potentially paint him as a nickel corner, which also likely made him less of a target higher up on the board.

Per Paul Domowitch
, here's Poyer's post-draft evaluation from an anonymous scout:

“This is a helluva value pick here. We had him as a late-five.
Some teams I talked to had him higher than that. Speed was the obvious
concern. Ran a 4.65. But he plays faster than that. Tight in the hips
and doesn’t have great recovery speed. But he’s got really good hand-eye
coordination. Had seven interceptions as a nickel last year, which is
where he’s going to play at this level. Eventually, I could see him
being moved to safety. He’s going to help them right away on special
teams. He was a gunner on their punt coverage unit and also can return
kicks. He needs to get a little stronger. He only did the 225-bench
eight times. I know he’s a corner, but that’s still pretty bad.’’

It was apparently enough for the Eagles, according to the aforelinked story from Reuben Frank, to pace like mad men as Poyer remained on the board and the team was without a pick:

“We didn't have a pick for a long time from round five
to round seven, and any of you guys that know me, that's not my most
comfortable thing,” [GM Howie] Roseman said. “I had to take a little walk to keep
myself in line a little bit. … And when I came back I said maybe I
should take another walk.”

“I don't know. I think that you're
very surprised about some of the guys that go undrafted, and you go, 'Oh
my god, how did that guy not get drafted?’ But it's the nature of the
draft process. It's unique."

So what's the deal with airline peanuts/Jordan Poyer?

Somehow, a consensus All-American fell all the way to the seventh round. And, if not for Chip Kelly, who took kids from the Pac-12 with four of his eight picks, Poyer had the potential to go undrafted. Either he validates the Eagles or proves why 31 other teams passed on him.

The Eagles already have a guy with a similar skill set in Brandon Boykin, but in age when so many front-office types talk about draft "value," is there anyone who had a greater seventh-round value than Jordan Poyer?

>> New Eagle Jordan Poyer: 'I'll remember who passed me up' [Roob]

NBC Sports Philadelphia Internship - Advertising/Sales

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NBC Sports Philadelphia Internship - Advertising/Sales

Position Title: Intern
Department: Advertising/Sales
Company: NBC Sports Philadelphia
# of hours / week: 10 – 20 hours

Deadline: November 20

Basic Function

This position will work closely with the Vice President of Sales in generating revenue through commercial advertisements and sponsorship sales. The intern will gain first-hand sales experience through working with Sales Assistants and AEs on pitches, sales-calls and recapping material.

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assist Account Executive on preparation of Sales Presentations
• Cultivate new account leads for local sales
• Track sponsorships in specified programs
• Assist as point of contact with sponsors on game night set up and pre-game hospitality elements.
• Assist with collection of all proof of performance materials.
• Perform Competitive Network Analysis
• Update Customer database
• Other various projects as assigned

Requirements

1. Good oral and written communication skills.
2. Knowledge of sports.
3. Ability to work non-traditional hours, weekends & holidays
4. Ability to work in a fast-paced, high-pressure environment
5. Must be 19 years of age or older
6. Must be a student in pursuit of an Associate, Bachelor, Master or Juris Doctor degree
7. Must have unrestricted authorization to work in the US
8. Must have sophomore standing or above
9. Must have a 3.0 GPA

Interested students should apply here and specify they're interested in the ad/sales internship.

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The pick-six that 'everyone down Broad Street heard'

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The pick-six that 'everyone down Broad Street heard'

Patrick Robinson was talking a little trash with some Eagles teammates before the NFC Championship, so when he came up with an interception, he sort of had to back it up.

“Two hours before the game, I was like, 'When I get a pick, I'm not going out of bounds,'" Robinson said. "When I got it, I was running down the sideline, and I was like, 'No, I definitely can't go out of bounds,' so I just cut it back upfield.”

The end result was a 50-yard return for a touchdown — a play that served to energize the Eagles, the home crowd and an entire fan base during the 38-7 win over the Vikings (see Roob's observations).

“I don't think it just pumped up the offense," Nick Foles said. "I think it pumped up the whole City of Philadelphia. I think everyone down Broad Street heard that.”

Not only did Robinson's pick-six tie the score at seven in the first quarter, it shifted the momentum in the Eagles' favor permanently.

There was an uneasy feeling over Lincoln Financial Field after the Vikings marched straight down the field on a nine-play touchdown drive. A penalty on the ensuing Eagles punt improved Minnesota's field position, while a conversion on third-and-long moved the offense close to midfield. Nothing was going right.

"We had to make a play because they drove right down and scored," Chris Long said. "If we didn't have believe in ourselves and a little toughness, you might've thought, 'Oh, man, it's gonna be a long night.' I know some people probably thought that watching on TV or whatever, but we know what we're capable of as a defense.

“On us, on defense, we had to go out and make a big play and create a turnover.”

Long did exactly that. The 32-year-old pass rusher beat the protection and reached Vikings quarterback Case Keenum mid-throw. The result was a pass that came up woefully short of its intended target — what Robinson described as "an easy pick."

Far less simple was the return. Robinson began by running down the sideline with a convoy of Eagles defenders. Then, with precious little room to maneuver and a promise not to run out of bounds, he cut all the way across to the opposite side of the field, outracing the remaining Vikings players to the pylon.

It was a runback worthy of a certain Eagles All-Pro punt returner.

“Pat, man, he was unbelievable out there," Long said. "He was like Darren Sproles with the ball.”

Robinson was happy to play the part, at one point directing fellow cornerback Ronald Darby to throw a key block that ultimately allowed him to get into the end zone.

“A lot of times you get a pick, there's always one guy that slips through the pack and gets a guy who has the ball," Robinson said. "But this time, all our guys were running hard and trying to make blocks for me.”

For a team that's leaned on home-field advantage all season long, winning nine games in their own building, you better believe that play came at a critical juncture in the contest.

"It got the crowd into it," Malcolm Jenkins said. "Defensively, that first drive, we were kind of uncharacteristic in the run game, missing tackles, just kind of leaky and unsettled. Once we got that, we evened the score back up, it was, 'OK, that was our restart.'

“The crowd is into it. Our offense got going. Defense started getting stops. That was a huge play in the game.”