charlie manuel

Howard, Rollins, Utley, Manuel connected again in fun way

tbs-ryan-howard-jimmy-rollins.jpg
TBS

Howard, Rollins, Utley, Manuel connected again in fun way

This was pretty darn cool.

The core members from the greatest run in Phillies franchise history were all connected in a way on Wednesday night.

Jimmy Rollins, who has been performing in-studio analysis for TBS during the MLB postseason, was joined by special guest Ryan Howard.

The ballgame they watched and analyzed? Game 4 of the Dodgers-Cubs NLCS, featuring old friend and teammate Chase Utley.

And then beloved former manager Charlie Manuel joined the fun. Let's just say he was a fan of the TBS crew.

Next season marks the 10-year anniversary of the 2008 world champion club.

Let's hope all four can reunite at Citizens Bank Park for the festivities.

That'll be special.

Charlie Manuel finally reveals what was in his infamous Wawa bag

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AP Images

Charlie Manuel finally reveals what was in his infamous Wawa bag

You surely remember Charlie Manuel and the Wawa bag.

When Manuel was fired on Aug. 16, 2013, he walked out of Citizens Bank Park with a Wawa bag in tow, creating a sad image to signify the end of an era in Phillies baseball.

And now we have an answer from the man himself as to what was in the bag. 

Now back with the Phillies as a senior advisor, Manuel has clearly been able to get over the heartbreak of the moment and even inject a little humor.

How Jim Thome got his batting stance thanks to Charlie Manuel and 'The Natural'

How Jim Thome got his batting stance thanks to Charlie Manuel and 'The Natural'

If there's anyone in the world I could sit next to for hours and listen to talk about baseball it would be former Phillies manager and World Champion of baseball Charlie Manuel.

Charlie is still very involved in the Phillies organization to this day and we're lucky enough to have 45 minutes of his time talking ball with longtime Phillies scribe Jim Salisbury.

Those two know the Phillies just about as well as anybody, so there's plenty of meat on the bone to chew on. The duo chatted for a recent episode of Sully's "At The Yard" podcast.

The story that caught my ear the most was Charlie's telling of how Jim Thome came to have that somewhat-goofy stance before he hits. It was a timing mechanism that Manuel stumbled upon in the strangest of ways.

This was when both Charlie and Jim were working for a Cleveland Indians' affiliate in the minors. 

"We were playing in Scranton and it was a Phillies triple-A team at the time. I kept thinking of a timing mechanism of some kind, a waggle or something, what Thome could do with his bat where he wouldn't tense up, where it would help him to relax and everything."

"I came into our locker room early," Manuel said. "I didn't let my players turn the TV on after a certain time. I came through the clubhouse that day, they had 'The Natural' on. I told 'em to turn it off. Some of the players said, 'Hey, Charlie, we're watching The Natural can we watch the end of The Natural? I said, 'Not really, what's the rule?'

"I saw Robert Redford standing there pointing the bat with one hand, bringing it back. I looked over at Thome, I said, 'you can finish watching the movie. From now on that's going to be your load.' I took him down in the cage and worked with him. The game started and the Phillies had a left-handed pitcher named [Kyle] Abbott. He was pitching that day. I told Jimmy, 'From now on that's your stance.' He gets up there the first time up, Abbott throws him a breaking ball away and he hit a home run to left center... I mean a longways. He come up the next time he hit another one to right center. I think he had three hits that day."

"That's a true story," Manuel added.

It sounds to good to be true. So we did a little research and Thome has told the same tale on a television special out in Chicago last summer.

"We were in Scranton and I was a guy who held the bat still and would go from a standstill and swing," Thome explained. "(Charlie) was watching The Natural and he saw that (Hobbs) kind of had this little wiggle to his stance, and I remember the day. We went out the next day, we worked early and he said 'Do me a favor and try holding the bat out there (pointing towards the pitcher) and get a little rhythm with your swing.' And from that day I never looked back. The following day we played a doubleheader and I hit two home runs."

You can listen to the whole podcast with Jim Salisbury and Charlie Manuel right here.