Cole Hamels

Cole Hamels' ridiculous mega-mansion is up for sale

Cole Hamels' ridiculous mega-mansion is up for sale

Have $10 million and need 19 bathrooms? Then Cole Hamels’ Branson, Missouri mansion can be yours.

According to Realtor.com, Hamels and his wife Heidi are selling one of the most over-the-top homes you’ve ever seen. The listing price is for a cool $9.75 million and the inside is completely unfinished, so you’re going to need a few more bucks to finish the job.

Hamels began building the 32,000 square-foot home in 2012 while he was still with the Phillies, but the couple has decided to relocate to the Dallas area rather than Missouri, where his wife is from.

Sitting on 104.7 acres of land with more than 1,700 feet of shoreline, this one-of-a-kind residence boasts some ridiculous features. In addition to the 10 bedrooms, the home has 13 full bathrooms and six half bathrooms. There are four separate living areas and includes a second kitchen, exercise room, wine cellar, elevator and a massive three-car barn/garage. There would have been plenty of room for Cole to display his World Series ring, and MVP trophies from the NLCS and World Series.

Hamels has one year left on the 6-year, $144 million contract he signed with the Phillies with a club and team option for 2019. After the 2019 season, Hamels will be 35 and a free agent. Perhaps he’ll need a new place to live.

Nicknames 2008 Phillies will use for Players Weekend

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Nicknames 2008 Phillies will use for Players Weekend

Chooch.
 
Hollywood.
 
Silver Fox?
 
The 2008 Phillies will go down as one of the most loved teams to ever play in the city of Philadelphia, and while most have moved on, the nicknames we called them back in the day, and some we didn’t, will appear on real Major League Baseball jerseys this season.
 
During the weekend of August 25-27, the first-ever Players Weekend will allow Major Leaguers to wear nicknames on the back of new-look jerseys for the first time. Here’s what the current Phillies team will look like, which features some interesting nicknames.
 
Here’s a look at how the still-active members of the 2008 World Series team will suit up.
 
Chase Utley, embracing his age and look, will be known as Silver Fox.
 


 
Cole Hamels, as he was known with the Phillies, will be Hollywood.
 

 
Chooch, will be known as Chooch.
 


Jayson Werth will simply be known as Dub.
 


 
Ryan Madson will wear Blest. Perhaps “Bridge to Lidge” was too long.
 

 
Joe Blanton will slim down his name, as he has his appearance, to Joe B.
 

 
J.A. Happ will go with Happer.
 

With evolving changeup and 4-pitch mix, Aaron Nola raising his own ceiling

With evolving changeup and 4-pitch mix, Aaron Nola raising his own ceiling

BOX SCORE

Once upon a time, Cole Hamels was a two-pitch pitcher: fastball and changeup. The changeup was so good so consistently that it didn't matter that Hamels' curveball command was often shaky. Two very good pitches were enough.

It wasn't until Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay arrived that Hamels began incorporating a fourth pitch, the cutter, and along the way, his curveball command improved substantially. Suddenly, a two-pitch lefty had a legitimate four-pitch mix and it took him to another level.

Watching Aaron Nola dominate the Brewers in Friday night's 6-1 Phillies win (see Instant Replay), Hamels' evolution came to mind. Nola allowed one run and struck out nine over seven innings, at one point whiffing eight of nine Brewers. And he did it with a four-pitch mix that included 31 sinkers, 27 fastballs, 20 changeups and 18 curveballs.

It's no longer sinker-curveball only with Nola. He's now giving his opponents more to worry about in the form of additional velocity on the fastball and a changeup that is becoming a money pitch.

"Nola was outstanding. He's been working on that changeup all year and it's really one of his better pitches right now," manager Pete Mackanin said. 

With a four-seam fastball that has been maxing out at 95 mph lately, a curveball that buckles hitters from both sides of the plate, a sinker with wicked two-seam movement and a changeup that he's beginning to feel comfortable throwing to righties and lefties alike, Nola may be making his jump to the next level before our very eyes.

"No question about it," Mackanin said. "That changeup, he threw a ton of them tonight to righties and lefties. I talked to him when we took him out of the game and he was real excited about throwing the changeup not just to lefties but to right-handers as well. If he can do that with the rest of the arsenal that he has, I expect a real good performance from him every time out."

The win made Nola 7-6 with a 3.38 ERA, which essentially means he's given up three runs every eight innings. Any team will take that from a starting pitcher. 

Over his last six starts, Nola has been lights-out — 1.70 ERA, .190 opponents' batting average, 50 strikeouts in 42 1/3 innings. Perhaps most impressively, he's held his opponents to a .118 batting average with runners in scoring position, second in the National League over that span to only Clayton Kershaw.

"My changeup ... I'm feeling consistent with it right now," Nola said. "It's evolved. I really didn't have much of a feel for my changeup [when I first came up]. It's a thing I worked on in spring training a lot this year, threw it in counts when I usually wouldn't. That's what spring training is for and I think it helped."

The changeup is a feel pitch and its success is usually dictated by the pitcher's arm angle and speed. If he throws it the same way he throws a fastball, that's where the deception of the slower speed comes into play. Nola has worked hard on those aspects of the pitch and it's clearly paying off.

Nola induced 15 swinging strikes on the night, six of them on changeups and five on curveballs. His strikeout numbers stand out because he was not billed as this kind of pitcher when he was drafted or was coming up through the Phillies' system. In the minor leagues, Nola struck out 7.6 batters per nine innings. In the majors, he's struck out 277 in 275 innings (9.1 per nine).

"I'm real happy about the way he's come along, especially after the elbow issues," Mackanin said. "He has increased velocity. His pitches are crisper. He's better now than before. It's really a nice jump for him to make."

Indeed it is. Perhaps Nola's ceiling is higher than No. 2 starter.