Dave Zangaro

Movie about former Eagle's life in the works

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Movie about former Eagle's life in the works

Pretty soon, you'll be able to see Jon Dorenbos' incredible story on the big screen. 

Producer and Philly native Mike Tollin, thanks to the Eagles' Super Bowl win, is fast-tracking a movie about Dorenbos' life, according to Deadline Hollywood. 

Tollin has been involved other sports films such as Summer Catch, Radio and Coach Carter.

This movie, which will be based on a book Dorenbos is writing with Larry Platt, will be based around Dorenbos' story back to when he used his magic as a coping mechanism to deal with childhood tragedy. 

For those who don't know his story, Dorenbos was just 12 years old when his father murdered his mother. Long before he became a professional long-snapper for the Eagles, Dorenbos used magic as an escape from reality. He continues to perform magic and was a hit on America's Got Talent.

Dorenbos, 37, played 11 seasons in Philadelphia before he was traded to the Saints last offseason. Upon his arrival in New Orleans, doctors found an aortic aneurysm. That ended his football career and sent him for open-heart surgery. 

Even though he wasn't a part of the roster, Dorenbos was included during the Eagles' playoff run. He was in Minnesota when the Birds won the Super Bowl, he paraded down Broad Street, and he's getting a Super Bowl ring. 

"Jon and I have been talking about this for a while, and I once told him we needed a third act, but I didn't mean nearly killing himself," Tollin told Deadline. "This is about overcoming obstacles and turning tragedies into positives and the story is so unlikely that I thought we'd need a coda to say the story was true. We have that, with Jon and the beautiful wife he just married, Annalise, in the parade with confetti falling on their heads."

Dorenbos told Deadline that going with Tollin, whom he has known for a while, was an easy decision and he sold him the book option for $1. 

There's no release date yet, but because of the recency of the Super Bowl win, the plan is to fast-track the movie. Tollin said the plan is to have the movie out by the time the Eagles are starting to defend their title in next year's playoffs. He said he's already talking to an A-list star about the project. 

"I have learned that the sooner you accept your reality, the sooner you can look at the positives in life," Dorenbos told Deadline. "My reality was that I lost both of my parents. My dad went to prison and my mom was killed. My sister and I stayed with a temporary foster family for a bit, until my aunt, my mom's sister, got custody of us. I loved magic. It was really the only time that I didn't think about all the crap, the counseling therapy, the grieving. I would sit at a table, shuffle cards and learn moves, for 10 hours at a time. As a kid, it taught me it was OK to be alone and work toward something. 

"I am a slow, pudgy white guy who never thought he would play football. I made two Pro Bowls and guess what? All I did was stay on the path and show up every day when others jumped off the path."

Nick Foles can't even go to Whole Foods anymore

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USA Today Images

Nick Foles can't even go to Whole Foods anymore

The Nick Foles World Tour continued on Thursday night as the Super Bowl MVP appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

The comedian and the backup-turned-Super-Bowl-MVP chatted about the newfound fame that had Foles in Los Angeles for this appearance and has had him seemingly everywhere since the Eagles beat the Patriots in Super Bowl LII.

Nothing is sacred anymore for Foles. 

"It's a little bit different," Foles said. "My safe spot to go was always Whole Foods. No one cared, no one recognized. But I can't go into Whole Foods now and I love going there. I knew things had changed when I went in there and got recognized."

Whole Foods had a suggestion for Foles.

Kimmel then noted how many Eagles fans are in L.A. (Remember when the Eagles basically had home games twice there this season?) Kimmel asked Foles if he's been seeing a lot of Birds fans while in L.A. 

Foles: "Everywhere. Everywhere we've been there's been a ton of Philly fans, which is awesome." 

Kimmel: "What do they do when they see you?"

Foles: "Most of the time it's ... cry. It starts off as a normal conversation, then it turns into tears. And everyone asks me, 'What do you do?'"

Kimmel: "Yeah, what do you do?" 

Foles: "I simply just say, 'I understand. I get it.' Trust me, I've been in Philly. I get it. I get it; I know. And it means a lot. And the fact that the whole city cried, it was so emotional, that's what was so special to us. To be a part of winning this thing and bringing it back home to where it hasn't been. That's what was so special. And if you look at the parade and everything that went on, all the fans, all the speeches players gave, Jason Kelce gave. If you haven't watched that speech, watch Jason Kelce's speech." 

Kimmel: "That was a beautiful speech. That was right up there with Dr. Martin Luther King. That was some speech and some outfit he was wearing." 

From there, Foles tried to explain Kelce's speech and what he was saying about Eagles fans. He, of course, noted Kelce did it with a little bit different language. 

Then Kimmel asked Foles about being a backup. The host noted that there's no way Foles could go back to being a backup, right? Well, what Kimmel might not know is that Foles is under contract in Philly for 2018 and Carson Wentz is still recovering from a torn ACL and LCL. 

"We love Philly," Foles said. "You know, that stuff's out of my control. My agents, they handle all that. But we love Philly, we love the situation. And we'll worry about it when that time comes."

Finally, Kimmel asked Foles if he's heard from Tom Brady since the end of the game. Foles said not yet. Foles did offer that after the Super Bowl ends, there's chaos on the field and it's hard to move or get anywhere.

Kimmel came up with a solid solution. Brady should send Foles a pair of Ugg boots ... with a pebble inside. 

Here's the full appearance: 

Doug Pederson doesn't want the power Andy Reid, Chip Kelly had

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Doug Pederson doesn't want the power Andy Reid, Chip Kelly had

It was Bill Parcells in the late-90s, relaying a message from a friend, who first coined the phrase that has become synonymous with coaches wanting more personnel power. 

You remember the line. 

"If they want you to cook the dinner," Parcells said, "at least they ought to let you shop for some of the groceries." 

It turns out, Doug Pederson is just fine being head chef at the NovaCare Complex. 

Just about a day before he and his team flew to Minnesota for the week of practices and obligations leading up to Super Bowl LII, Pederson was asked in a small media session if he'd ever want to gain more personnel control. Pederson thought about the question pretty briefly. 

"Right now, I kind of like the way it's going," he answered. "It's going to take you away from football. If you do more personnel, you can't coach football."

If there was ever a time for Pederson to ask for more power, it's now, fresh off a brilliant season that ended with the franchise's first-ever Super Bowl title. But there's something so simple about Pederson that just seems to work for him. He'll let Howie Roseman and the front office handle that other stuff. He's a football coach and he wants to coach football. 

Anything else would just get in the way of that. 

The Eagles, of course, have a history of muddling these waters. During Andy Reid's 14-year run in Philadelphia, he gained more and more personnel control. He basically became head coach and GM, which isn't all that uncommon in the NFL. Just look up a little North toward New England, where Bill Belichick runs the entire operation. But even Reid grew tired of all that power and when he went to Kansas City, he told his new owner he was looking forward to getting back to simply coaching. 

And then there was the Chip Kelly fiasco. Eagles owner Jeff Lurie has basically said that he gave Kelly personnel control because he thought it was the only way to maximize Kelly and it was the only way to place all the blame at his feet when it blew up. Of course, we're paraphrasing a little here, but that's basically what happened. And did it ever blow up. Kelly the personnel man was largely to blame for Kelly the coach getting fired. 

Which brings us to Pederson. It would have been laughable if a couple years ago Pederson had walked into the NovaCare Complex and told them he wanted any personnel control. Back then, he was a head coaching candidate whom the Eagles liked, but wasn't thought of very highly around the league. He had a thin resume and there had to be plenty of skeptics inside and outside of the building about his coaching ability. But now, those questions have been answered and it would no longer be laughable if Pederson marched up to Lurie and said he wanted to play a bigger role in the front office. 

It just doesn't seem like he wants that. 

"I wanted to coach football," Pederson said. "We hire professionals to do personnel, with our input, as coaches. I get that. The personnel department and Howie can make the final decision, and I get that, but not without having extensive conversations with us first." 

Those conversations are key. Because as much as Pederson doesn't have the power, he's still involved with the power. Roseman's personnel department has done a good job of keeping Pederson and his coaching staff (specifically Jim Schwartz) involved. The word "collaboration" is a favorite of Lurie's and for good reason. It really wouldn't make much sense for a front office to go out and get players the coaching staff didn't agree with. To keep Parcells' analogy going, the guy who buys the groceries better know what his chef's specialties are. If he's an Italian cook, maybe keep the soy sauce on the shelf. 

The working relationship between the front office, coaching staff and scouting staff is incredibly important for the future of the franchise. All three parts need to be on the same page and when they're not, they need to be able to dialogue about it. 

"Our communication is extremely good," Pederson said. "If he has something, he comes right down to my office, or vice-versa and I go down to his. It goes back to the players, if you're not communicating even with your personnel staff and staying abreast of everything, that's when things can kind of put a little chink in your armor, but it's been great so far."

Pederson is just entering Year 3 as the Eagles' head coach and that's enough for him right now. Will it be in another five years? There's not really a way to tell. Some of his mentors — Reid, Don Shula and Mike Holmgren — all ended up wading into the waters of personnel control. But for now, that doesn't seem to be Pederson's plan. 

He's happy just cooking the dinner. And he's pretty good at it too.