jimmy rollins

Howard, Rollins, Utley, Manuel connected again in fun way

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TBS

Howard, Rollins, Utley, Manuel connected again in fun way

This was pretty darn cool.

The core members from the greatest run in Phillies franchise history were all connected in a way on Wednesday night.

Jimmy Rollins, who has been performing in-studio analysis for TBS during the MLB postseason, was joined by special guest Ryan Howard.

The ballgame they watched and analyzed? Game 4 of the Dodgers-Cubs NLCS, featuring old friend and teammate Chase Utley.

And then beloved former manager Charlie Manuel joined the fun. Let's just say he was a fan of the TBS crew.

Next season marks the 10-year anniversary of the 2008 world champion club.

Let's hope all four can reunite at Citizens Bank Park for the festivities.

That'll be special.

Jimmy Rollins has the house to beat in the East … and it can be yours

Jimmy Rollins has the house to beat in the East … and it can be yours

I guess if you were a member of the 2008 Phillies, it’s the summer to sell your house. Yesterday, we featured Cole Hamels' absolutely insane 10-bedroom Missouri mega-mansion, and today, it’s longtime Phillie and 2007 MLB MVP Jimmy Rollins, who recently put his Swedesboro, New Jersey, estate up for sale.

Rollins, who saw his 17-year career likely come to a close after a failed stint in Spring Training with the San Francisco Giants earlier this season, listed his five-bedroom, 3.5 bath house less than a month ago for $799,000, the same exact price he bought it for.

According to Realtor.com, Rollins moved into the home in 2005, well before he earned the vast majority of the near $100 million he would pull in during his career.

Especially for the price, roughly $9 million less than Hamels’ crib, this house is pretty sweet. It sits on 2.58 acres of land and is a total of 5,292 square feet. In addition to the eat-in kitchen and massive walk-in closets, the best part of this house has to be the backyard, which includes a pool with hot tub and a waterfall.

Other features of Rollins’ house include a detached three-car garage, a full finished basement, poker room and gym.

Here’s the entire listing, complete with photos and information.

Freddy Galvis' base-running gaffe caused owner John Middleton to send an email

Freddy Galvis' base-running gaffe caused owner John Middleton to send an email

Wondering how hands-on Phillies owner John Middleton is?

Enough so that when Freddy Galvis failed to run out a pop up that Jose Reyes dropped on Tuesday night, reaching first base instead of second, Middleton fired off an email to his top two baseball men: team president Andy MacPhail and GM Matt Klentak.

"I was upset and I emailed Andy and Matt and I said, 'I'd like to understand what's happening here,'" Middleton said Thursday morning on 94 WIP's Morning Show.

The lack of hustle was a rare occurrence for Galvis, who was probably frustrated that he popped up and didn't expect the ball to veer so far back into fair territory.

"I thought Pete (Mackanin) did a really good job of explaining it," Middleton continued. "One time is one thing, two times is different, three times is different still. But I'm perfectly OK with where Pete came out on that."

There was a lot of talk about rebuilding timelines and Middleton's willingness to spend to put together a contending team when the time is right. These are comments he's made several times since stepping out as the face of ownership as the rebuild began, including in a three-part interview last fall with CSN's Jim Salisbury.

Here are some of the more interesting tidbits from Angelo Cataldi's interview with Middleton:

When did he know it was time to rebuild?
Middleton said he was ready to turn the page after the 2012 season, when the Phillies went 81-81. With Ryan Howard injured, Hunter Pence and Shane Victorino traded away and Roy Halladay on the decline, Middleton was realistic about the Phillies' inability to seriously contend.

His farewell to Howard
The famous story is that after the Phillies' 2009 World Series loss to the Yankees, Middleton said to Howard, "I want my (bleeping) trophy back."

It came up again on Howard's last afternoon as a Phillie.

"Ryan, I'm still ticked off we don't have our [bleeping] trophy back," Middleton said to him.

He pays attention to Fangraphs' minor-league rankings
"I don't know if you know this but Fangraphs has rated us on their KATOH system as tied with the Yankees for the most (minor-league) players with a grade of 40 or better," Middleton said on WIP.

(A grade of 40 means refers to a projectable major-league player -- a bench bat, middle reliever, spot starter.)

Middleton is pleased with that ranking and cited advice he was once given about building quantity in the farm system -- that if one of every three of your prospects pans out you're doing your job, and if one of every two does you're ahead of the curve.

On the comparison Jimmy Rollins made of him to George Steinbrenner
"I love the comparison. ... I'm as obsessed with winning as he was."

Does Middleton ever get impatient?
"As long as I'm track and on schedule -- and I think we are -- then I can be patient. But if I don't see that progress that's when I get impatient very quickly."

Where are the Phillies in their path back to contention?
"We're in Year 3 and I think we're on track. I like to think we're on the shorter end of that spectrum -- four or five years as opposed to six or seven."

On spending big
"Whatever we can't develop internally, you have to be able to trade and sign free agents. And we have the money to do it. Look, we had the number two, three, four payroll in baseball for like four years, maybe five. We're going to be there again. Philadelphia's a big market and we're going to operate it like it's a big market.

"The way we budget in our organization isn't that we create a financial budget and say to Matt and Andy and say, 'Here's your number, do the best you can.' We look at them and say, 'Your job is to tell us what's the best team that you can put on the field at this particular time given where we are in our cycle and where you want us to be a year or two or three from now. And then you tell us how much that's going to cost us.

"The only reason professional sports teams exist -- I shouldn't say the only reason, but the most important reason -- is to win. And if you're not aiming to win then you really don't belong owning a sports team in my opinion.

"I'm intent on winning. We're going to get that trophy back somehow or I'm going to die trying."