Juan Samuel

Pitching coach reportedly draws managerial interest from Phillies

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Pitching coach reportedly draws managerial interest from Phillies

We know of only two men the Phillies have interviewed for their managerial vacancy: Juan Samuel and Jorge Velandia, according to NBC Sports Philadelphia's Jim Salisbury.

Another name to keep an eye on is Mickey Callaway, the Cleveland Indians' pitching coach. The Phillies are "taking a close look" at him, per ESPN's Buster Olney.

Callaway, 42, has been Cleveland's pitching coach since 2013, a period during which the Indians have had one of the best staffs in baseball. Over that span, Cleveland has posted a team ERA of 3.65, which is lowest in the American League by a significant margin (the Rays are next at 3.84) and fourth-lowest in the majors.

Let's be real, though, that has much more to do with Corey Kluber, Carlos Carrasco and an elite bullpen. On the flip side, guys like Mike Clevinger, Trevor Bauer, Josh Tomlin and Danny Salazar have shown some improvement through the years, which reflects well on Callaway.

Before working his way through the coaching ranks in Cleveland's farm system, Callaway pitched in the majors from 1999 to 2004 with the Rays, Angels and Rangers.

Callaway's offseason began Thursday, the day after the Indians were shockingly eliminated from the playoffs by the Yankees after building a commanding 2-0 series lead.

Phillies' coaching staff to become 'free agents' after season finale

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Phillies' coaching staff to become 'free agents' after season finale

Pete Mackanin will not manage the Phillies after Sunday's season finale, but he does have a future with the organization. He will become a front-office adviser next season.

His coaching staff does not have the same clarity.

General manager Matt Klentak told the team's coaches on Friday that they would become "free agents" after the season ended on Sunday.

"He thanked everybody and said everybody did a great job," bench coach Larry Bowa said. "He said whoever the [new] manager might be, we’re going to tell him about our staff and we think you did a good job and it’s going to be up to that manager to interview you. And he said, but if any of you guys want to make calls on Monday, you’re like free agents. And he thanked everybody."

In addition to Bowa, the staff includes pitching coach Bob McClure, assistant pitching coach Rick Kranitz, bullpen coach John McLaren, first base coach Mickey Morandini, third base coach Juan Samuel and hitting coach Matt Stairs, who was interviewed by Klentak and hired last fall.

Bowa, Samuel and Morandini all have deep Phillies roots and were fan favorites during their playing days. They remain so now. Stairs also has Phillies roots. He hit one of the biggest home runs in club history in the 2008 National League Championship Series and connected well with players in his first season on the coaching staff.

It's not clear who will be back in 2018. Maybe some will. Maybe none will.

Bowa, 71, expressed a desire to return to the organization that he has been in for 33 of his 52 years in pro ball.

"My No.1 priority is to stay in this organization," Bowa said. "That’s all I’m going to say about that. That’s No. 1. And if I’m not, then I’ll look for other stuff. But right now, I want to stay in this organization.

"This is my home. This is where I grew up. People recognize me as a Phillie. I just think that, I’m still, age-wise, what, 71, but you guys see me work every day. I’m relentless when it comes to that. So if they have something in mind, I’m going sit down and talk with them and see where it goes."

Would Bowa consider a position off the field?

"You know, I don’t know right now if it’s on or off, as long as it involves the Phillies," said Bowa, who does have broadcasting experience. "I'll do anything. I want to stay in this organization. That's all."

Bowa was surprised that Mackanin was let go.

"Pete did a great job," Bowa said. "He took a really young team – and then we obviously got reinforcements, some good young players – and if you take a look at what he did in the second half, I thought he did a great job. But nothing in baseball – you see everything in baseball – when you’re in baseball a long time, you’re not shocked by anything. Baseball is baseball. That’s the way it is. He’s just a good guy."

Mackanin has always had a great sense of humor. He kept that even as he informed the team on Friday afternoon that he would manage his last game Sunday.

"When Pete was talking, they were pretty somber," Bowa said. "But Pete had a way of loosening them up. His last comment, he says, 'I want you guys to play hard like you have been. If you win the last three games they might want to change their mind.'"

Bowa laughed.

"Typical Pete," he said.

And, yes, the Phillies did win Friday night (see observations). They are 36-37 since the All-Star break with two games remaining.

Phillies on pace for 111 losses after bizarre late-game bullpen meltdown

Phillies on pace for 111 losses after bizarre late-game bullpen meltdown

BOX SCORE

In the big picture — and that's what has really mattered right from the beginning of this season — something quite positive happened for the Phillies on Wednesday night: A young, promising pitcher took a nice step forward and for the second straight start offered hope that he might just be a reliable piece of the rotation when this rebuilding club is ready to be relevant again.

But in the narrow view, it was easy to look right past Nick Pivetta's six innings of three-run, 10-strikeout ball. That's how bad the losing has been. Every night offers a gaper delay on the highway to 100 losses.

Did we say 100?

How about 111? That's the Phillies' current pace after an ugly 7-6 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals (see Instant Replay) — and 111 losses would match a franchise high set in 1941 when Doc Prothro's club went 43-111.

It's bad, folks.

But you already knew that.

This one was especially unsightly for how the Phillies lost it. They blew a five-run lead under the weight of a barrage of home runs — two against the bullpen in the eighth and ninth innings — had the potential winning run cut down at the plate by 20 feet in the bottom of the ninth then lost it in the 10th after a troubling meltdown by reliever Edubray Ramos.

You almost had to see it to believe it. And if you didn't see it, don't bother looking for a replay. It will only hurt your eyes.

"We let that five-run lead get away from us," manager Pete Mackanin said. "Real disappointing night. Pivetta did a really good job for us, gave us six good innings. And we had 16 hits; you have to win a game when you get 16 hits. We couldn't push any more runs across until that 10th inning. Very disappointing."

Pivetta — 19 strikeouts in his last two starts — took a 5-0 lead to the mound in the fifth and was tagged for a home run on a 3-2 fastball in that inning. No problem. He issued a two-out walk in the sixth then served up a first-pitch, two-run homer to Jedd Gyorko. Little problem, but not fatal.

Things started to turn bad in the eighth when reliever Joaquin Benoit served up a first-pitch homer to Jose Martinez to make it a one-run game and they got worse when Hector Neris blew his second save in three games when he gave up a game-tying homer to Tommy Pham (his second of the game) on a 1-1 fastball in the ninth.

In the 10th, Ramos gave up a leadoff double to Martinez. The reliever then balked Martinez to third and gifted him home plate on an errant pickoff throw to first base. (It sailed way over Tommy Joseph's head.) The Cards ended up scoring two runs in the frame. The second one came in handy when the Phils pushed across one in the bottom of the inning.

Ramos looks like a pitcher who needs to go to the minors to clear his head. In his last three outings, he has faced eight batters and allowed three hits, three walks and seven runs. He has also committed a costly balk and a costly error, signs that's he becoming a little overwhelmed.

"I don't know what to tell you," Mackanin said. "It looks like he's mixed up or something. He's not the same guy."

Ramos declined to speak with reporters after the game.

But Odubel Herrera and Pat Neshek did agree to chat.

Neshek, the Phillies' best reliever, was conspicuously absent from a close game. He threw 28 pitches Sunday, had a day off Monday and threw 11 on Tuesday. He was not available. What was curious was that Mackanin said Neshek had told him he was sore. Neshek said he never said such a thing, that he showed up to the ballpark and was told he was getting a day off, which he actually thought was a good idea. But sore? Not so, he said.

As for Herrera, he drew attention for running through third base coach Juan Samuel's stop sign in the bottom of the ninth inning and getting nailed at the plate for the final out. Samuel said it was the first time a player had ever run through one of his stop signs. In this case, Herrera almost ran him over.

"It's just bad timing for it," Samuel said.

There was some question as to whether Samuel's stop sign went up too late, but Herrera dismissed that. He said he was simply running with his head down.

"I was playing aggressive," he said. "I wanted to win the game. So when I was rounding third, I put my head down. I kept going to home plate. I saw [the stop sign]. But I saw it late. I put my head down. That's my mistake."

Making a mistake didn't make Herrera unique Wednesday night.

"The mistakes we're making are giving the other team too many pitches to hit," Mackanin said. "Those are our mistakes. Especially late in the game."