Kobe Bryant

NBA Notes: Lakers to retire Kobe Bryant's Nos. 8, 24 next season

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NBA Notes: Lakers to retire Kobe Bryant's Nos. 8, 24 next season

LOS ANGELES -- One retired jersey number just isn't enough for Kobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers.

The Lakers will retire Bryant's No. 8 and No. 24 in a ceremony Dec. 18 during their game against Golden State, the franchise announced Tuesday.

Bryant wore No. 8 from 1996 to 2006, when he switched to No. 24 for the remainder of a 20-year career spent entirely with the Lakers. He will be the 10th player honored by the Lakers with a retired number hung high on the Staples Center wall, but the first in NBA history to have two numbers retired by the same team.

"Kobe's jerseys are taking their rightful home next to the greatest Lakers of all time," Lakers owner Jeanie Buss said. "There was never any doubt this day would come. The only question was when. Once again, Lakers fans will celebrate our hero, and once again, our foes will envy the legendary Kobe Bryant."

The five-time NBA champion and 18-time All-Star selection is the Lakers' franchise leader in points (33,643), games played (1,346), 3-pointers (1,827), steals (1,944) and free throws (8,378), among countless superlatives.

Bryant is the third-leading scorer in NBA history after becoming the first player to spend at least 20 seasons with one franchise. He retired in 2016 with a bravura 60-point performance in his farewell game against Utah.

"As a kid growing up in Italy, I always dreamed of my jersey hanging in the Lakers rafters, but I certainly never imagined two of them," Bryant said in a statement. "The Lakers have bestowed a huge honor on me, and I'm grateful for the fans' enthusiasm around this game" (see full story).

Timberwolves: Muhammad reportedly returning to team
MINNEAPOLIS -- A person with knowledge of the situation tells The Associated Press that Shabazz Muhammad has agreed to return to the Minnesota Timberwolves on a one-year deal.

The Wolves and Muhammad agreed to terms on the veteran minimum deal on Tuesday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the contract has not been signed.

Muhammad has spent all four of his NBA seasons with the Timberwolves. He averaged 9.9 points last season and was a restricted free agent when the summer began. The Wolves eventually rescinded their rights to him to make him an unrestricted free agent. He never got the long-term offer for which he was hoping.

It was an important move the Wolves, who were thin on the wing behind starters Andrew Wiggins and Jimmy Butler.

ESPN first reported the agreement.

Knicks: Oakley sues team owners for defamation
NEW YORK -- Former New York Knicks star Charles Oakley sued the team's owners Tuesday, saying he was defamed when they claimed he committed assault and was an alcoholic after his February arrest at a game.

The lawsuit details how Oakley was treated before and after he was forcefully removed from Madison Square Garden during the first quarter of a Feb. 8 Knicks' loss to the Los Angeles Clippers. It seeks unspecified damages.

Oakley was a Knicks fan favorite from 1988 to 1998. He was accused of striking a security guard during the February fracas.

Last month, prosecutors agreed to dismiss charges after six months of good behavior.

Many of the lawsuit's more venomous claims are directed at team owner James Dolan, who was near Oakley when the popular power forward was seen shoving security guards before they pulled him away from his seat.

The lawsuit says that long before the game, Dolan had "constantly disrespected" Oakley, refusing to make eye contact or shake his hand during meetings, denying him fan appreciation nights and making him pay for his own tickets to games.

The lawsuit blames Dolan for Oakley's removal from the game, saying Oakley "was treated like a common criminal" after Dolan directed security to "forcibly remove Mr. Oakley from the Garden and publicly embarrass him on live television" (see full story).

Carson Wentz helps students get out of their final

Carson Wentz helps students get out of their final

With just one retweet, a class of high school students now has a lighter load.

West Chester Rustin student Collin Hurley sent a tweet to Carson Wentz Wednesday morning after his teacher agreed to cancel their class' final exam if the Eagles star quarterback retweeted the message before Sunday. Wentz was quick to respond.

The second-year player is not the only Philly athlete to help a group of local students. Just last week, Ben Simmons did the same.

And this has been a trend of late, with Kobe Bryant doing the most notable favor a couple of weeks ago.

Teachers sure are gullible these days.

Kobe Bryant was just like you: obsessed with Allen Iverson

Kobe Bryant was just like you: obsessed with Allen Iverson

In what is essentially a very smart piece of marketing for a sports drink, Kobe Bryant shares a few stories in The Players Tribune about how he was obsessed with Allen Iverson's game when he first entered the NBA as a member of the Los Angeles Lakers.

Long story short: A.I. was really good and Kobe wasn't so good yet. A.I. lit Kobe up one game. Kobe was sad. Kobe studied tape. Obsessively. He used the word "Musecage." He obsessed over getting better and getting back at A.I.

And he did one time. And it made him happy.

Kobe does not work like the rest of us. A sampling:

I had to study this man maniacally.

I obsessively read every article and book I could find about AI. I obsessively watched every game he had played, going back to the IUPU All-American Game. I obsessively studied his every success, and his every struggle. I obsessively searched for any weakness I could find.

I searched the world for musings to add to my AI Musecage.

This led me to study how great white sharks hunt seals off the coast of South Africa.

The patience. The timing. The angles.

All of this is to say: drink Body Armor sports drink. Based on the below clip, you'd think the sports drink could also be worn as a fancy cologne.