Philly Fans

Damage reported as some Eagles fans take celebration too far

Damage reported as some Eagles fans take celebration too far

The city was cleaning up Monday after pockets of Super Bowl victory celebrations turned unruly overnight, with rowdy Eagles fans smashing department store windows, looting a gas station convenience store and toppling a number of the city's famously greased light poles.

The vast majority of revelers celebrated peacefully, and only three arrests were made, said Ajeenah Amir, a spokeswoman for Mayor Jim Kenney.

"Tens of thousands came out and celebrated this amazing victory, and but for a handful of bad actors the celebration was peaceful and jubilant," Amir said. She lauded police for "their assistance in getting the crowds dispersed and people home safely."

Just as Nick Foles and the Eagles clinched a surprising 41-33 victory over the New England Patriots in Minneapolis for the team's first Super Bowl title Sunday night, the scene more than 1,000 miles away in Philly was jubilation and pandemonium.

As time expired, crowds spilled into the streets to celebrate the Eagles' first NFL championship since 1960.

Revelers shot off fireworks, drivers beeped their horns and Philadelphians young and old descended on Broad Street.

Some of the pockets of unruly fans clambered atop the awning at the swanky Ritz Carlton Hotel near City Hall. At least a dozen people who climbed on top of an awning, which toppled to the street when the structure collapsed Sunday night.

Videos posted to social media showed fans scaling the vinyl and metal blue awning and then jumping off.

Eventually, when a number of people climbed onto the structure at the same time, it folded in on itself.

Warning: the video below contains profanity.

These people was on top of the ritz Carlton 😳😳😳

A post shared by Syreeta D. Williams (@reeta_theblackbeauty) on

Nearby, windows were smashed at a Macy's department store and at an Old Navy clothing store.

And apparently no amount of grease in the world can keep some drunken Eagles fans from climbing poles in celebration. A few managed to shimmy up traffic lights and street sign poles.

Amir said there were reports of some injuries from falls near light poles but no exact numbers were available.

Vandals were seen having an apparent food fight inside a gas station's convenience store, yelling "Everything is free!" and overturning a car outside a hotel. After 1 a.m., the only people allowed inside the 24-hour Wawa convenience store near City Hall were police officers.

Philly fans party like never before after Super Bowl victory

Philly fans party like never before after Super Bowl victory

The rain and hail that pelted Philadelphia for much of the day dissipated just as people across the city spilled out of sports bars, apartments and houses.

They all had one destination: Broad Street.

It was time for a celebration 58 years in the making.

On Sunday night, just as Nick Foles led the Eagles to a surprise Super Bowl victory over the New England Patriots in Minneapolis, the scene more than 1,000 miles away in Philly was jubilation and pandemonium.

Fireworks were set off. Car horns blared. And Philadelphians young and old descended on Broad Street, the iconic thoroughfare that will soon host a parade to commemorate the city's first major pro sports championship since the Phillies won the 2008 World Series.

"The city deserved it," said 66-year-old Lou Potel, who threw a party at his home just off Broad before joining a much bigger party outside. "It's a great city, and now we have a Super Bowl to go along with it."

Like so many other fans, Potel's love for the Eagles has been passed down from generation to generation. He went to the Super Bowl with his son the last time the Eagles played in the title game in 2004, and said that watching Sunday's championship with his son "made up for it."

Dustin Seidman, 42, and his wife Staci, 41, decided to bring their 10-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter to the festivities on Broad Street, even as drunken fans sprayed beer and climbed trash trucks, street poles and awnings. Social media video showed the awning outside the Ritz-Carlton Hotel collapsing with more than a dozen people on it, but it was unclear if there were any injuries.

There were many other young kids on Broad Street, with parents weaving strollers between people and cars and some even holding infants in carriers. One youngster rode a scooter while wearing an Eagles helmet.

"We wouldn't miss this," Dustin Seidman said. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience."

As his son then asked to keep walking north to City Hall, he added: "Does life get any better than this?"

For Staci Seidman, the thought of her late grandfather, a die-hard Eagles fan, immediately crossed her mind when the game ended. She wasn't alone.

Rick Campitelli, 63, who came into the city to watch the game with his son, said he wished his father-in-law could have been alive to see this moment.

"This is the greatest," said Campitelli, wearing the jersey of Wilbert Montgomery, the former Eagles running back to whom he once sold insurance. "I was hoping they would do it before I died, and they did it."

The scene in Boston was far more somber as fans inside the Banshee Bar had to come to terms with a rare loss for Tom Brady. Some, however, took it in stride.

"I've got nothing to complain about," Boston resident Bill Crowley said. "It's the greatest dynasty in NFL history and this loss tonight doesn't change that.

"They'll be back," Conor Hobert added. "One hundred percent, they'll be back."

Sam Murphy, 40, actually made the trip from Boston to Philadelphia, flying in Sunday morning before planning to fly back for work Monday. The longtime Eagles fan and Boston resident joked he couldn't be within 100 miles of his home, instead deciding to watch the game with his old University of Pennsylvania roommate Rob Ballenger, 41, at Grace Tavern, near 23rd and South Streets.

While standing in the back of the packed bar, Murphy drank Newbolds in honor of his father-in-law Ron Skubecz, who loved that beer and who once gave his children a football signed by Eagles legend Chuck Bednarik. Skubecz, a lifelong Eagles fan, died just three weeks ago, making Sunday's championship even more emotional for Murphy.

"This is Philly at its best," said Murphy, as he, Ballenger and hundreds of other new friends paraded down South Street to get to the party on Broad. "This team is what Philly is all about."

Sea of Eagles green already taking over U.S. Bank Stadium

USA Today Images

Sea of Eagles green already taking over U.S. Bank Stadium

MINNEAPOLIS — On Monday night, Brent Celek said his favorite celebration from the season was when the Eagles did the Flying V. 

It turns out Eagles fans fly together, too. 

With hours until kickoff, the purple of U.S. Bank Stadium is slowly being overtaken with midnight green as Eagles fans make their way into the stadium. Based on early return, it seems pretty clear this is going to be an Eagles crowd for Super Bowl LII. 

With about three hours until kickoff, there have already been over a dozen loud Eagles chants and when both teams were shown entering the building, there was a clear difference. The Patriots were booed and the Eagles were cheered. 

The NFL is allowing dog masks into the stadium, as long as they're taken off as fans go through security. 

It has to be tough for Vikings fans to see the Eagles logo painted in one of their end zones, but there it is, on the east side of the stadium, opposite the giant glass window where a Nick Foles poster hangs next to one of Tom Brady. 

While it's a frigid 3 degrees outside, the temperature-controlled U.S. Bank Stadium is warm. And it's also an architectural marvel; really unique. 

During early pregame warmups, Carson Wentz actually took the field in warmup gear to throw passes to Darren Sproles and Jordan Hicks. He's walking without a cane these days, but is still throwing off his back foot. 

After Sunday's Super Bowl, Wentz's timeline to return to action will become the big story in Philadelphia. But on Sunday night, it's all about Nick Foles and the rest of the Eagles trying to finish what Wentz started. 

It's almost here. 

Inactives will be announced at 5 p.m. EST; kickoff is at 6:30.