Quinton Rose

Return of leader Josh Brown gives Temple backcourt depth to strike back

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Return of leader Josh Brown gives Temple backcourt depth to strike back

When fifth-year senior guard Josh Brown tore his Achilles tendon in late May 2016, it dealt a huge blow to the Owls’ 2017 NCAA Tournament chances.

Brown, who led the AAC with 36.2 minutes per game as Temple’s primary ball handler in 2015-16, underwent surgery on May 25 and came back for five games early in the year. But after a 78-57 loss at Villanova in mid-December, Brown was ruled out for the rest of the season.

The loss of the Owls’ backcourt leader put their young guards in a tough position, thrusting them into the spotlight without much experience. Although they acquitted themselves well, Temple had a disappointing season, finishing 16-16 and losing in the first round of the AAC Tournament to East Carolina.

The Owls did not advance to a postseason tournament and missed the NCAA Tournament for the third time in four years.

However, with Brown returning for his fifth year after being granted a medical redshirt, the Owls' glaring weakness from last year is now their greatest strength.

“The [guard] rotation is going to be interesting for us,” head coach Fran Dunphy said. “We’ll probably play four guards a number of times because we have an abundance of guys that want to be out there and need to be out there on the court. We have a bunch of guys that are ready to go. Again, as our preseason stuff has been working, it’s been the competitiveness that has been terrific.”

Junior guard Shizz Alston Jr. will be a big part of that rotation. After Brown was lost for the season in 2016-17, Alston became Temple’s primary ball handler as a sophomore with little experience.

He had to average 36.4 minutes per game and responded well, leading the team with 13.9 points and 4.1 assists per game.

“His mindset is totally different,” Brown said about Alston. “Going from his freshman year to his sophomore year, he was thrown into the fire and I thought he did a pretty good job, you know. Now, with all that experience he has on the court, I think he’s ready to take that next step and be a consistent scorer and a be a consistent guy on defense and be a consistent guy that we can all lean on.”

Sophomores Quinton Rose and Alani Moore had to make up for the absence of Brown, as well, averaging 24.8 and 25.8 minutes per game last year, respectively. Moore, a starter in his freshman year, likely will come off the bench this season, which is a true testament to the amount of depth the Owls have in the backcourt.

Moore’s offensive versatility, which allows him to bring the ball up in certain situations and play on the wing, as well, will be very important if the Owls want to make it back to the NCAA Tournament.

“You can let other guys bring it up and have others guys do other things on the court, so it helps out a great deal,” Brown said. “It opens up everybody’s game. Like Alani Moore, he’s a point guard, but he’s also a great shooter, so he can spot up from time to time and things like that.”

“Alani and Q aren’t your average sophomores,” Alston added. “We played almost the same amount of minutes [last year] and I’m a junior, so they’re very veteran guys already.”

Players have also been raving about the talent and competitiveness that freshmen guards/wings Nate Pierre-Louis, J.P. Moorman and De’vondre Perry have shown throughout the offseason and preseason.

“It’s amazing, I’ve never seen freshmen this ready to play,” Alston said. “J.P. can bring the ball up, ‘Dre can bring the ball up, even Nate sometimes, so it’ll help us a lot.”

When you factor Trey Lowe, a redshirt sophomore guard who missed all of last season as he has been recovering from a February 2016 car accident and could return later this season, into the equation, the Owls have an incredibly deep and versatile backcourt.

The last time the Owls made it to the second weekend of the NCAA Tournament was in 2001 when they lost to Michigan State in the Elite Eight. According to Alston, immediately after the Owls were bounced from the AAC Tournament last year, they talked about their potential to make a run.

“We see teams like South Carolina go all the way, teams similar to ourselves that are not the big blood teams like Kentucky or Duke,” Alston said. “We think we can make it to the second round, third round or as far as we want.”

If they’re going to do it, their veteran backcourt will be the reason why.

Quinton Rose to participate in USA men's U19 World Cup training camp

Quinton Rose to participate in USA men's U19 World Cup training camp

Temple sophomore guard Quinton Rose has been invited to participate in the USA men's U19 team's World Cup training camp from June 18-25.

Rose is one of 28 players invited to the camp (see all invitees here). The camp will be hosted at USA Basketball's Olympic training center in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

In his freshman season on North Broad Street, Rose averaged 9.7 points, 3.8 rebounds and 1.8 assists and 1.44 steals in 32 games. His 1.44 steals per game were fifth-best in the American Athletic Conference. He finished fourth on the Owls in scoring and rebounding.

The Rochester, New York, native earned the AAC's Rookie of the Year honor four times in his freshman campaign and was named to the conference's All-Rookie team.

The 2017 FIBA U19 World Cup begins July 1 in Cairo, Egypt.

Instant Replay: UConn 64, Temple 63

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Instant Replay: UConn 64, Temple 63

Temple’s roller coaster season continued with a new low on Sunday afternoon.

The Owls, who led nearly the entire way, allowed UConn guard Jalen Adams to make a reverse layup with 2.9 seconds remaining in a 64-63 loss at the Liacouras Center.

Shizz Alston Jr. missed the potential game-winning shot from half court as time expired.

Turning point
The Owls (14-14, 5-10 AAC) looked like they might avoid blowing a 10-point lead after Quinton Rose responded to Rodney Purvis’ game-tying three-pointer with a three of his own to give them a 63-60 lead with 2:32 left.

However, the Huskies (14-12, 9-5 AAC) responded with a pair of free throws from Adams before he snaked his way into the lane with the clock running down for the game-winner. The layup gave UConn its seventh win in the last eight games.

Big men on campus
The Huskies were led by Rodney Purvis’ game-high of 18 points on 7 of 14 shooting. He also added five assists. 

Adams shot just 5 of 13 for 13 points, but connected with the game on the line. He also chipped in five assists and five boards.

The Owls received a jolt Sunday from their young players, as freshmen Damion Moore and Alani Moore II scored a combined 22 points on 9 of 10 shooting. 

In a solid all-around effort, Temple’s Daniel Dingle scored 17 points, with six boards and six assists. Alston Jr. contributed 11 points, six assists and 5 rebounds.

Inside the box score
• After making 5 of 9 shots from three-point range in the first half, Temple finished the game 7 of 21 from deep.

• UConn's Kentan Facey had a big game in the first matchup between the two teams with 23 points and 10 rebounds. On Sunday, the senior was held to eight points and four rebounds after dealing with foul trouble in the first half.

• Temple couldn’t find any room inside, as the Owls lost the points in the paint battle 26-16.

History lesson
With the win, UConn improved to 9-7 in the all-time series. The victory was the Huskies’ third straight in the series.

Up next
The Owls will continue on a three-game homestand Wednesday at 7 p.m. against UCF.

UConn will stay on the road and play at Houston also on Wednesday.