Dodgers fan wearing Chase Utley jersey catches Justin Turner home run ball for 2nd year in a row

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MLB

Dodgers fan wearing Chase Utley jersey catches Justin Turner home run ball for 2nd year in a row

Dodgers fans had a reason to be ecstatic on Sunday night after Justin Turner hit a walk-off three-run homer in the bottom of the ninth to beat the Cubs, 4-1, and give Los Angeles a 2-0 lead in the NLCS.

But not as ecstatic as one fan in particular.

Keith Hupp, a retired police officer and lifelong Dodgers fan, was waiting under the home run ball in the center-field stands and snagged it with his son's glove. He was also wearing a Dodgers Chase Utley jersey.

He even made the catch with his non-preferred hand.

“I’m a lefty,” Hupp said to J.P. Hoornstra of the Orange County Register. “I’ve dislocated my right shoulder so many times, I had to resort to my son’s glove on my left hand. So the last five or six home run balls I’ve caught, I’ve caught with my left hand.”

And the craziest part about this story is that it wasn't the first time it had happened. Hupp caught Turner's sixth-inning solo homer in Game 3 of last year's NLCS against the Cubs in almost the same place, the center-field stands at Dodger Stadium.

Although he has 24 home run balls in his collection, Hupp won't be keeping last night's game-winner. After making the catch, he gave the ball to a security guard, and was escorted underneath the stadium to meet Turner and make a trade with him. 

In a postgame interview with MLB.com, Turner said Hupp couldn't decide what he wanted for the ball right away. They exchanged information and agreed that Hupp will get back to Turner in a few days when he decides what he wants.

Twitter had some good responses to Hupp's memorable home run catch:

Pitching coach reportedly draws managerial interest from Phillies

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AP Images

Pitching coach reportedly draws managerial interest from Phillies

We know of only two men the Phillies have interviewed for their managerial vacancy: Juan Samuel and Jorge Velandia, according to NBC Sports Philadelphia's Jim Salisbury.

Another name to keep an eye on is Mickey Callaway, the Cleveland Indians' pitching coach. The Phillies are "taking a close look" at him, per ESPN's Buster Olney.

Callaway, 42, has been Cleveland's pitching coach since 2013, a period during which the Indians have had one of the best staffs in baseball. Over that span, Cleveland has posted a team ERA of 3.65, which is lowest in the American League by a significant margin (the Rays are next at 3.84) and fourth-lowest in the majors.

Let's be real, though, that has much more to do with Corey Kluber, Carlos Carrasco and an elite bullpen. On the flip side, guys like Mike Clevinger, Trevor Bauer, Josh Tomlin and Danny Salazar have shown some improvement through the years, which reflects well on Callaway.

Before working his way through the coaching ranks in Cleveland's farm system, Callaway pitched in the majors from 1999 to 2004 with the Rays, Angels and Rangers.

Callaway's offseason began Thursday, the day after the Indians were shockingly eliminated from the playoffs by the Yankees after building a commanding 2-0 series lead.

Why sports are awesome: Joel Embiid's Twitter and Rhys Hoskins

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Associated Press

Why sports are awesome: Joel Embiid's Twitter and Rhys Hoskins

Sports Ilustrated gets it. The characters in Philadelphia sports are some of the best in the world right now.

On SI's list of "77 Reasons Why We Love Sports," the alien otherwise known as Rhys Hoskins and Joel Embiid's Twitter both make appearances. While the NFL Red Zone Channel inexplicably comes in at No. 1, Embiid's Twitter comes in at a worthy No. 2. His recent tweet about the Los Angeles Chargers' beleaguered rookie kicker is a great example of why Embiid is a must-follow.

Hoskins, the Phillies' record-breaking slugger, comes in at No. 65. His latest mind-bending accomplishment is becoming the fastest player ever to 45 RBIs. With Hoskins' ridiculous natural power and impressive plate discipline, this stretch doesn't look like a fluke. He could be one of the top reasons Philadelphians love sports for the next 15 years.