Yordano Ventura

MLB Notes: Yordano Ventura’s toxicology report will not be released to public

MLB Notes: Yordano Ventura’s toxicology report will not be released to public

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The toxicology report on Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura won't be released to the public following his death last month in a car crash in his native Dominican Republic.

Tessie Sanchez, a spokeswoman for the Dominican attorney general's office, said the toxicology report is not a public document, The Kansas City Star (http://bit.ly/2ldVdLC ) reported Thursday. The findings only will be released to Ventura's family and attorneys.

Ventura was 25 on Jan. 22 when he died on a highway leading to the town of Juan Adrian, about 40 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Santo Domingo. The right-hander pitched his entire career for the Royals, going 38-31 with a 3.89 ERA.

The toxicology results are an important piece in determining whether the Royals are obligated to pay the remainder of Ventura's contract, which is valued at $20.25 million. Royals officials initially said they were told toxicology results for Ventura would be completed in about three weeks. (see full story)

Giants: Hill signed to minor league deal
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Versatile infielder Aaron Hill has agreed to a minor league contract with the San Francisco Giants and would get a $2 million, one-year deal if he is added to the 40-man roster.

Hill joins a growing list of veteran infielders in the mix to try to land a job out of spring training, along with Jimmy Rollins and Korean Jae-gyun Hwang. Eduardo Nunez is the projected starting third baseman with Conor Gillaspie expected to play as well.

The 34-year-old Hill, who has familiarity with the NL West from his years with the Arizona Diamondbacks, spent last season between Milwaukee and Boston. He batted .262 with 10 home runs, 14 doubles and 38 RBIs in 125 games. Hill spent the previous five seasons with the D-backs.

Orioles: Brach wins arbitration
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Brad Brach became the first player to beat the Baltimore Orioles in salary arbitration in 22 years, ending the team's nine-hearing winning streak.

Brach was awarded $3.05 million instead of the team's offer of $2,525,000 by arbitrators Edna Francis, Robert Herzog, Sylvia Skratek. The panel issued its decision, Friday, a day after hearing arguments.

A right-hander who turns 31 in April, Brach was 10-4 with a 2.05 ERA in a career-high 71 appearances last year and made $1.3 million. He struck out 92, also a career best, in 79 innings and had two saves.

Baltimore had not lost since its case against pitcher Ben McDonald in 1995. Orioles backup catcher Caleb Joseph lost his case this month and will get $700,000 rather this his $1 million request.

Players and teams have split 14 decisions. New York Yankees reliever Dellin Betances was the final case Friday, and the 15 hearings are the most since clubs won 10 of 16 decisions in 1994.

Yankees: First arbitration case in 10 years
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Dellin Betances and the New York Yankees have argued the year's final salary arbitration case, the first for the team in nearly a decade.

Eligible for arbitration for the first time, Betances asked for $5 million. The Yankees argued during Friday's hearing he should be paid $3 million.

A decision by arbitrators Steven Wolf, Dan Brent and Sylvia Skratek is expected Saturday. Players and teams have split 14 decisions this year, and the 15 hearings are the most since clubs won 10 of 16 decisions in 1994.

New York renewed Betances at the major league minimum $507,500 last year. A setup man for the first four months, he took over as closer after the trades of Aroldis Chapman to the Chicago Cubs and Andrew Miller to Cleveland.

A right-hander who turns 28 in March, Betances figures to be primarily a setup man again following Chapman's decision to return to the Yankees, who gave him an $86 million, five-year contract -- a record for a relief pitcher. Betances struck out 126, leading big league relievers for the third straight year, and went 3-6 with a 3.08 ERA and 12 saves in 17 chances.

Since defeating Mariano Rivera in 2000, the Yankees' only arbitration hearing was in 2008 when pitcher Chien-Ming Wang was awarded a raise from $489,500 to the team's $4 million offer instead of his $4.6 million request.

Rays: Tommy Hunter agrees to minor league contract
PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -- Reliever Tommy Hunter has agreed to a minor league contract with the Tampa Bay Rays, who are giving the 30-year right-hander an opportunity to earn a job in a revamped bullpen.

The team said details of the contract had yet to be finalized. The 30-year-old, who pitched for four other teams during his nine-year major league career, reported to spring training Friday.

Hunter was 2-2 with a 3.18 ERA in 33 appearances for Cleveland and Baltimore last year. in 2016. He also has pitched for Texas and the Chicago Cubs.

Rays manager Kevin Cash said Hunter "brings a ton of energy to the clubhouse" and is a "power pitcher who's pitched a lot of big innings in the AL East."

"It's always nice to have that experience," Cash said, adding that Tampa Bay also pursued the right-hander last offseason.

"Veteran arm, versatile, a guy who has shown the ability to go more than an inning," Cash said. "We're thrilled. We really recruited him hard."

Nationals: Murphy talks about Tebow’s power
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- No less an authority on hitting than last season's runner-up for NL MVP thinks Tim Tebow has some ability with a bat -- he just needs more work.

Washington Nationals second baseman Daniel Murphy said Friday at spring training that he recently spent some time working on batting with Tebow, the Heisman Trophy winner and former NFL quarterback who now is pursuing a baseball career. Tebow is expected to be in minor league camp with the New York Mets next month.

Murphy said he and Tebow live about 15 houses apart in Jacksonville but had never met.

"He's quite an impressive person," Murphy said.

And as for his assessment of Tebow's skills with a bat in hand, based on their hitting session at a Jacksonville high school?

"I think that the power is real. What he needs is at-bats," Murphy said. "He needs 500, 600 plate appearances to try to make adjustments on the fly. It's always interesting to see what happens when -- he's done all this work, and he's improved greatly -- you go from someone trying to hit your barrel to someone trying to not hit your barrel. He just needs that experience to pull from, which only a full season can give you."

Murphy finished second in the NL with a .347 average and fourth with 104 RBIs in 2016 for the NL East champion Nationals.

He enjoys talking and thinking about hitting -- and working on it with players, including at a clinic he runs with his brother for high schoolers from Jacksonville.

The Mets signed Tebow to a minor league contract late last year.

An outfielder who didn't play the sport in college, he hit .194 in the Arizona Fall League, striking out 20 times in 70 plate appearances.

Yordano Ventura, Andy Marte die in separate Dominican crashes

usa-yordano-ventura-andy-marte-crash.jpg
USA Today Images

Yordano Ventura, Andy Marte die in separate Dominican crashes

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Yordano Ventura quit school as a teenager so he could begin working a construction job to help his family make ends meet, laboring day after day in the hot sun of the Dominican Republic.

It was a chance tryout with the Kansas City Royals that changed the trajectory of his life.

Yordano wowed scouts with an electrifying fastball, the best they had seen in years, and a confident demeanor that bordered on brash and arrogant. And both of those traits served him well as he rocketed to the major leagues, helped the Royals win a long-awaited World Series championship in 2015, and became one of the most popular players in a city that embraced baseball one again.

Ventura, whose nickname "Ace" fit so perfectly, died Sunday in a car crash on a stretch of highway near the town of San Adrian in his native Dominican Republic. He was 25.

"Our team and our organization is hurting deeply," Royals general manager Dayton Moore said. "It's certainly something that puts everything into strong perspective, and challenges us all to never grow tired or weary or cease to do what is right, and loving others. Nobody is guaranteed tomorrow.

"We loved Yordano," Moore said. "We loved his heart, we loved who he was as a teammate, a friend. He was somebody that challenged us all and made us better and I'm going to miss him."

Highway patrol spokesman Jacobo Mateo said Ventura died on a stretch of highway 40 miles northwest of Santo Domingo, the nation's capital. Mateo did not say whether Ventura was driving.

He's the second young star pitcher to die in past four months. Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was 24 when he was killed along with two other men in a boating accident near Miami Beach in late September.

Also Sunday, former major league infielder Andy Marte died in a separate car accident in the Dominican Republic. Metropolitan traffic authorities said he died about 95 miles north of the capital.

"I was traveling to the airport this morning and I got a phone call wanting to know if I'd heard about Yordano, and I thought they meant Marte," Moore said. "My first thought was, `Were they together?'

"Then shortly afterwards, I got a call from Major League Baseball confirming this tragedy."

The Dominican Republic has the second-highest traffic-related death rate in the world -- officials there believe alcohol, speed and a blatant disregard for traffic laws is to blame. Oscar Taveras, Jose Oliva, Rufino Linares and Jose Uribe are among players who have died in crashes in the country.

It wasn't known whether Ventura had been drinking or speeding at the time of his accident.

Hall of Fame pitcher Pedro Martinez, a fellow Dominican whom Ventura called his hero, posted pictures of Ventura and Marte on Twitter and said, "Guys, the only way we can pay tribute to you, is by reflecting on the adjustments we all have to make in this game called life."

Moore speaks frequently with Latin American players about dangers of returning home, including driving on the perilous roads.

"I'm more intentional about it to the point where it probably goes in one ear and out the other," Moore said, "but we're constantly discussing these things."

The Royals lowered flags at Kauffman Stadium to half-staff Sunday, and displayed Ventura's photograph on the large, crown-shaped scoreboard in centerfield of the empty ballpark. Fans were leaving flowers, hats and other mementos within hours of learning of his death.

Royals teammates learned the news in a text chain and took to Twitter to share their sorrow.

"I love you my brother. I'm in disbelief and don't know what to say," first baseman Eric Hosmer said.

Third baseman Mike Moustakas also expressed disbelief, tweeting: "I love you Ace. I don't know what to say other than I'm going to miss you a lot. RIP ACE."

Ventura will be buried Tuesday in the Dominican Republic. Moore, manager Ned Yost and other members of the Royals are planning to attend.

Before his start in Game 6 of the 2014 World Series, Ventura paid tribute to Taveras, his close friend and countryman who had been killed days earlier in a car accident in the Dominican Republic. Ventura wrote "RIP O.T (hash)18" on his hat and also wrote messages on his glove, cleats and the mound before shutting out San Francisco for seven innings in a win.

"If he was still here, I would for sure be talking to him, and Oscar would be very happy for me," Ventura said afterward. "Oscar was a very humble guy and very likable, and I'm going to miss him a lot."

Ventura signed a $23 million, five-year deal with the Royals shortly before he started on opening day in 2015. He then helped them bounce back from their loss to the Giants in Game 7 by returning to the World Series and beating the New York Mets in five games for their first crown since 1985.

The right-hander went 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA last season, and his fiery demeanor was never more evident than when he hit Orioles star Manny Machado with a fastball to trigger a brawl. Ventura was suspended nine games for the pitch, though it was cut to eight on appeal.

In a surreal coincidence, the 33-year-old Marte played his final game in the big leagues for Arizona on Aug. 6, 2014. Ventura started that game for Kansas City.

"Today is a very sad day for our entire game and particularly for the many loyal fans in the Dominican Republic, the home of both Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte," Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement.

Said players' union head Tony Clark: "It's never easy to lose a member of our fraternity, and there are no words to describe the feeling of losing two young men in the prime of their lives. Our thoughts and prayers go out to their families, friends, teammates and fans throughout the United States and Latin America."

Moore said he spoke to Miami general manager Mike Hill early Sunday, in part because Moore admired the grace and heart in which the Marlins organization dealt with Fernandez's death.

It wasn't certain whether Fernandez was driving the boat when it crashed on Sept. 25. He had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.147, above Florida's legal limit of 0.08, according to autopsy reports released by the Miami-Dade County Medical Examiner's Office.

"That was one of the first things that came to mind when I began to figure out how we were going to process this," Moore said. "Mike was able to provide some insight. Just give me some comfort, really."

Ventura wound up pitching his entire career for the Royals, going 38-31 with a 3.89 ERA.

Born June 3, 1991, in Samana, Dominican Republic, Ventura was a true rags-to-riches story. He quit school at 14 and was laboring on a construction crew to support his family when he heard about a tryout, which led to a spot in the Royals' academy located on his picturesque island home.

Still, the odds were long that Ventura would ever make it to the big leagues. Very few players from the Dominican academies reached the pinnacle of the sport.

But over time, Ventura was able to harness one of the most electric fastballs that scouts had seen in years, and his headstrong and confident nature was essential to his rapid rise. He made his debut to great fanfare in 2013, allowing just one run again Cleveland in a sign of things to come.

He eventually became a cornerstone of a youth movement that included young stars such as Hosmer and Moustakas, one that carried the Royals first to respectability, then to the top of the American League.

He was 14-10 with a 3.20 ERA in 2014, his first full season in the big leagues, and helped the Royals reach the World Series for the first time in nearly three decades. Then he helped to lead them back to the Fall Classic in 2015, this time completing the job on a crisp night in New York.

"He always had a zest for life, an innocence about the game, a freshness, a fearlessness," Moore said, his voice cracking. "He was a very compassionate human being, loved to compete, no doubt challenged us, but that made us better. Nobody could ever doubt how much he cared about his teammates, how much he cared about the fans, and how much he loved to compete and to pitch."

An unusual trade candidate, what is Cesar Hernandez worth?

An unusual trade candidate, what is Cesar Hernandez worth?

It's not easy to gauge the trade value of Cesar Hernandez.

The Phillies' 26-year-old second baseman, who was a "hot name" in trade talks at the GM meetings last week, according to CSN's Jim Salisbury, is an unusual trade candidate. He's young, inexpensive, under team control and coming off a breakout season for a team committed to youth.

And yet the possibility exists that the Phillies do this winter with Hernandez what they did last with closer Ken Giles: sell high.

There are many branches to this tree, so let's go point by point:

Would it actually be a sell-high?
You can't ever truly know whether a player has peaked or fluked his way to a successful season. If the Phillies were to trade Hernandez, they'd be doing it under the assumption that one of those two things happened in 2016.

Hernandez hit .294/.371/.393 with 14 doubles, a league-leading 11 triples and six homers in 2016. He played like an All-Star from the time of his benching in late June through the end of the season, hitting .326 with a .421 on-base percentage over his final 83 games. He impressed in the second half with his stroke, his plate selection and a bit more pop than expected. 

There were still justified questions, though, about Hernandez's baseball IQ, instincts, defense and base running. He has well-above-average speed but was just 17 for 30 stealing bases. Pete Mackanin said a few times during the season that Hernandez just hasn't yet learned how to time pitchers and get good jumps. 

In the field and on the bases, Hernandez has been prone to mental lapses that take away from his overall game.

The big question is whether Hernandez's second half was an outlier or a sign of better things to come. A team interested in acquiring him would be betting on the latter.

There's a legitimate chance that Hernandez is on his way to reaching new heights, but there's an equal or better chance he never comes close to replicating that .421 OBP. So if you're the Phillies and you believe that you have other solid middle infield options, now would be the time to explore a trade.

What would be the right return?
Just like last winter with Giles, it only makes sense to move Hernandez if a meaningful offer materializes. With Giles, Phillies GM Matt Klentak turned a closer into five starting pitchers. How many of them end up contributing remains to be seen, but I wrote at the time that even if the trade was just Giles for Vince Velasquez, it made sense for the Phillies because a starting pitcher is more important than a closer for a non-contending team.

With Hernandez, a trade only makes sense if the Phillies bring back a major-league ready player. Hernandez is too young, too cheap and too intriguing to trade for an unproven prospect unless it's a safe, top prospect ... the type of prospect a team wouldn't part with for Cesar Hernandez.

It's not as if the Phillies need to trade him. They could easily go into next season with Hernandez at 2B, Freddy Galvis at SS and Howie Kendrick in LF. When the time comes for J.P. Crawford to debut, the Phils could use a combination of Galvis and Hernandez at 2B, opting for Hernandez when offense is needed and for Galvis when defense is a priority.

So the Phils have leverage. Adding to that leverage is the fact that there is not a single productive everyday second baseman on the free-agent market. The best options there are 33-year-old utilityman Steve Pearce and 37-year-old Chase Utley.

Which teams need a second baseman?
If you're a team in need of a second baseman — the Angels, White Sox, Dodgers, Reds, Royals and Athletics look like the only six possibilites in the league — your best bet is finding him via trade. 

The Angels (Cliff Pennington) and White Sox (Tyler Saladino, injury-prone Brett Lawrie) would be the two best fits for Hernandez.

The Reds (Brandon Phillips) and A's (Jed Lowrie) have older 2B who won't be around much longer.

The Dodgers (Enrique Hernandez) and Royals (Whit Merrifield/Raul Mondesi) could stand to upgrade as well.

Comparable players
The first step in figuring out a sensible trade return for Hernandez is identifying similarly skilled players. The offensive numbers Hernandez put up last season — .294/.371/.393 — actually compare best to prime Luis Castillo. Hernandez has more pop; Castillo was by far a better base runner.

You rarely see a big trade return for a player like Hernandez, whose best skills are hitting singles and taking walks. And you rarely see such a player traded away while he's still young and cheap. The 2017 season will be the first of Hernandez's four arbitration years, meaning he's under club control through the end of 2020. That's important for both mid-market clubs that don't have a ton of money (A's, Reds, Royals) and big-market teams that are already spending a lot (Dodgers, Angels).

So, who are some players with skills similar to Hernandez who were traded early in their careers? Two that come to mind were both Phillies at one point: Michael Bourn and Ben Revere.

The Phillies traded Bourn when he was a 25-year-old with just 144 plate appearances in the majors. Bourn was well-thought-of as a future leadoff hitter and the Astros believed in him enough to trade Brad Lidge and Eric Bruntlett to the Phils for Bourn, middle reliever Geoff Geary and flawed power prospect Mike Costanzo.

Revere was traded by the Twins to the Phillies at age 24 for a pair of right-handed pitchers: Vance Worley and Trevor May. Worley was already somewhat established at that point, and the Twins started him on opening day before quickly giving up on him. May at that time was still a prospect with a high strikeout rate but middling results.

Denard Span, a career .284/.350/.393 hitter, is another example. Three weeks after the Twins traded Revere to the Phillies, they traded Span to the Nationals for pitcher Alex Meyer, who was drafted in the first round the previous year. Span was a more proven player than Hernandez at the time of that trade, but he was also more expensive.

Three different trades, three different types of return. One trade netted a successful veteran closer. One brought back two young pitchers, one of whom was major-league ready. One brought back a highly touted pitching prospect.

All three players mentioned above played center field at the time of the trade. Hernandez plays second base, an equally in-demand position, but he also has the ability to play some shortstop, which adds to his value. Would a team acquire him to be its everyday shortstop? Probably not. But Hernandez has just one error in 127 career innings at shortstop at the major-league level, so an acquiring team would likely have enough confidence that he'd play passable defense there if needed.

Finding the right return
League-wide, second base is as deep as it's been in years, leaving only those six aforementiond teams as fits for Cesar.

Angels: If the Angels want Hernandez, a logical return for the Phillies could be left-handed pitcher Tyler Skaggs. Skaggs, 25, has already been a part of two big trades and has flashed some potential when he's been on the field. He missed all of 2015 after undergoing Tommy John surgery, but when healthy he's been solid, posting a 4.26 ERA with 7.5 K/9 and 2.9 BB/9 in 28 starts. The Phillies could use a young left-handed starter in their all-righty rotation.

Right-hander Matt Shoemaker would be another option, but he's probably off limits given the Angels' myriad pitching injuries. Shoemaker was quietly very good last season, going 9-13 with a 3.88 ERA, 1.23 WHIP, 8.0 K/9 and 1.7 BB/9 in 27 starts. Like Hernandez, he enters the first of four arbitration years in 2017. The difference is Shoemaker is 30 years old, so he doesn't fit the Phillies' timeline perfectly.

According to Fox Sports' Ken Rosenthal, either pitcher could be made available for an everyday second basemen. The Orange County Register's Jeff Fletcher backed up that idea.

White Sox: Moving on to the White Sox, there's not a true, major-league ready fit. The Phillies have no chance at getting Jose Quintana or Carlos Rodon for Hernandez. The only slightly impactful young hitter Chicago may be willing to part with is outfielder/DH Avisail Garcia, but that wouldn't be a good 1-for-1 deal for the Phillies.

Reds: Brandon Phillips' conract expires after 2017, and he's now more willing to waive his no-trade clause, according to Fox Sports' Jon Morosi. When he leaves, Cincinnati could simply replace him with talented young middle infielder Jose Peraza, but Peraza is also a candidate to take over at SS in the increasingly likely event Zack Cozart is traded.

Hernandez makes sense for a team like the Reds, who are rebuilding, financially strapped because of huge contracts, and who need more OBP atop their lineup.

The Reds have several young pitchers worth targeting, most notably Raisel Iglesias and Anthony DeSclafani

Iglesias, 26, is due $18 million over the next four years, but when the Reds signed him out of Cuba they gave him the option to opt out and file for arbitration once he's eligible. So he could end up being more expensive.

He's an extremely talented 6-foot-2 right-hander who Cincinnati used in the second half kind of how the Indians used Andrew Miller — Iglesias would come into high-leverage situations and pitch multiple innings out of the bullpen. In 55 career appearances (21 starts), Iglesias has a 3.42 ERA and 1.14 WHIP with 187 strikeouts and 54 walks in 173⅔ innings. 

The game is trending in a direction that will make pitchers like Iglesias increasingly valuable moving forward. Hernandez for Iglesias straight-up would be an interesting trade for the Phillies because it would vastly improve their bullpen and give them another hard thrower who could potentially compete for a job in the rotation. The Reds probably wouldn't do it, but it's worth exploring.

DeSclafani, also 26, would be even harder to pry away from Cincy. He's been solid the last two seasons, going 18-18 with a 3.74 ERA for a terrible team in the game's second-most hitter-friendly ballpark.

Dodgers: It might seem odd to include the Dodgers here after they traded their second baseman, Kendrick, to the Phillies, but that move had financial implications. L.A. wanted to clear up some payroll space to try to re-sign Kenley Jansen, Justin Turner and Rich Hill. 

Hernandez, a young and inexpensive player capable of playing multiple positions, checks every box the Dodgers' analytical front office prioritizes. And for all the money L.A. spends, this is a win-now team that currently projects to start Kike Hernandez at 2B and Rob Segedin at 3B. 

The Dodgers are a possible but unlikely destination. They covet their top prospects, so forget about right-hander Jose De Leon. Power-hitting first baseman/outfielder Cody Bellinger might be a name to remember, though. He has 56 homers and 112 walks the last two seasons.

Yasiel Puig's name always comes up in trade rumors, but if the Dodgers do eventually trade him, you'd think it would be for more than Hernandez. Puig is a free agent after 2018.

A's: The reason I'm including the A's here is because Oakland always values high-OBP guys like Hernandez, and incumbent second baseman Jed Lowrie is 32 with a weak glove, declining bat and expiring contract.

Hernandez would make a lot of sense for the A's and could even be an option to play some shortstop if Marcus Semien (56 errors the last two seasons) is moved to second or third base.

The A's love acquiring players under team control because they have such little money to spend. Billy Beane could look at Hernandez as his leadoff man for the next four years.

Players to monitor? Outfielder Khris Davis hit .247/.307/.524 last year with 42 homers and 102 RBIs. He's an average defensive outfielder who doesn't walk (42) and strikes out a lot (166). The only reason he's a candidate to be moved is because he's about to begin his arbitration years and players with huge home run totals tend to do well in those hearings. Davis is going to be much more expensive than Hernandez the next few years, and the A's routinely unload players at peak value before they get pricey.

Davis has flaws, but he's also the type of power bat the Phillies would want to add to the middle of their lineup.

Sonny Gray, also set to begin his arbitration years in 2017, is another possibility. The third-place Cy Young finisher in 2015, Gray took a huge step back in 2016, posting a 5.69 ERA in an injury-shortened season. Klentak could look at this as a prime opportunity to buy low on a potential ace.

Hernandez wouldn't get you Gray straight-up, but the Phillies have many other young players they could include in the right package. At 27, Gray fits the Phils' timeline. 

As with Puig, though, you'd figure Gray's team could get more than Hernandez and a prospect for him in a trade.

Royals: The player to target on the Royals would be Yordano Ventura. Hernandez for Ventura would be a pretty even trade, giving the Royals a starting 2B who would be a better leadoff option than Alcides Escobar, and netting the Phillies a talented, hard-throwing albeit volatile starting pitcher.

Ventura is 26 years old, so he fits the timeline. He throws hard, so he'd offer the Phillies something only Velasquez does. And from Kansas City's standpoint, it would be a way to fill a hole and save money, which is always a concern in that market. Ventura is due $3.45 million in 2017, $6.45 million in 2018 and $9.95 million in 2019 — $19.85 million total the next three seasons.

Ventura would come with some questions, notably his attitude, beanball propensity (which has invited controversy), and control. Ventura has walked 3.5 batters per nine innings in 93 career starts. 

I wrote about Ventura over the summer when exploring a possible Odubel Herrera trade and still think it could make some sense if the Phillies like him at all. 

I'm not certain trading Hernandez is the way to go here, but if the Phillies move him it needs to be for a player positioned to help immediately like Velasquez did in 2016.