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Auburn overwhelmed in 38-0 loss to No. 5 Georgia

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Auburn overwhelmed in 38-0 loss to No. 5 Georgia

AUBURN, Ala. (AP) Losing to Georgia is one thing. But getting shut out by their longtime rival brought a little extra pain to a lost season for Gene Chizik and the Auburn Tigers.

Auburn managed only 238 yards, including 57 yards rushing, as it was overwhelmed in a 38-0 loss to the fifth-ranked Bulldogs on Saturday night.

Auburn (2-8, 0-7 Southeastern Conference) has only one more chance for a conference win, at Alabama on Nov. 24.

``It's what you see,'' Chizik said when asked about the season. ``It's been frustrating. Again, it's just been one of those years where it has kind of snowballed in momentum and we haven't been able to catch any.''

The Tigers play host to Alabama A&M next week in their final home game.

Georgia (9-1, 7-1 SEC) got the first shutout for either team in the series since its 28-0 win in 1976.

``It's very painful,'' Chizik said. ``It's painful for coaches and players and certainly the fans and alumni. It's very painful for everybody.''

Georgia, the Eastern Division champion, earned its second straight trip to the Dec. 1 SEC championship game in Atlanta. Top-ranked Alabama, beaten by No. 15 Texas A&M 29-24 on Saturday, can win the Western Division title by beating Auburn on Nov. 24.

Auburn freshman Jonathan Wallace, making his second start, completed 15 of 22 passes for 181 yards with one interception. Emory Blake had six catches for 104 yards.

``We just didn't finish,'' Wallace said. ``We didn't finish our drives. We made mistakes. We didn't capitalize when we had opportunities.

``That's not going to win the game, but we just have to keep going. You have to keep going, and you have to keep pushing. That's the biggest thing right now, not giving up. The guys aren't giving up, and we just have to keep pushing.''

Tre Mason was Auburn's leading rusher with 11 carries for only 33 yards.

For the Tigers, the lopsided defeat was similar to a 63-21 home loss to Texas A&M on Oct. 27. In each game, many Auburn fans left in the third quarter.

When asked after the game about his future at Auburn, Chizik said ``I don't entertain those thoughts.''

Asked if he thought he has lost his team, Chizik said ``I don't. Absolutely not.''

The biggest cheer from Auburn fans came early in the game during a break after Georgia's first touchdown when the score of rival Alabama's loss to Texas A&M was posted on the video board.

Auburn's defense couldn't stop Aaron Murray, who completed 18 of 24 passes for 208 yards with three touchdowns and no interceptions. Murray threw scoring passes to Chris Conley, Malcolm Mitchell and Tavarres King.

Murray devastated the Auburn defense with his efficiency in Georgia's no-huddle offense, directing quick-strike touchdown drives on his first four possessions.

Auburn, last in the SEC in run defense, was bullied by Georgia's freshman tailback duo of Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall. Gurley had 11 carries for 116 yards and a touchdown. Marshall had eight carries for 105 yards, including a 62-yard touchdown run in the third quarter.

``It was bad,'' said Auburn defensive end Dee Ford. ``They ran the ball on us.''

The Bulldogs, who have won four straight, appear to be peaking at the end of the regular season.

``I think we've been improving as we go and hopefully we can keep it going,'' said coach Mark Richt.

Georgia lost to Louisiana State in last year's SEC championship game. This year, the Bulldogs want more.

``I think there's a different feeling in everybody's spirit that Atlanta is not the end of the road,'' Richt said.

By the start of the fourth quarter, Bulldogs fans were the majority in Jordan-Hare Stadium.

``It was awesome,'' Murray said. ``We looked up midway through the third quarter and I was like, `Man, we've got more fans here than they do right now.'''

After the game, Georgia players rushed to corner of the end zone to celebrate with their faithful, who chanted ``SEC! SEC!''

Georgia's most important win in its search for a SEC championship was a 17-9 defeat of then-No. 3 Florida on Oct. 27, but the Bulldogs struggled on offense in that game. The win over Auburn was the team's most well-rounded win of the season.

The defense, led by Jarvis Jones' two sacks and Bacarri Rambo's interception and forced fumble, posted its first shutout in a SEC game since a 43-0 win over Vanderbilt in 2010.

The offense boasted impressive balance with 289 yards rushing and 208 yards passing. The Bulldogs had no turnovers and only three penalties for 15 yards.

``We're playing pretty good right now,'' Richt said.

Murray, who completed his first 10 passes, was rested in the fourth quarter as backups Parker Welch and Christian LeMay finished the game.

Each of the four first-half touchdown drives lasted less than 4 minutes. A 49-yard run by Gurley set up Murray's 6-yard touchdown pass to Conley.

Auburn's first turnover spoiled a scoring opportunity late in the third quarter. Emory Blake gained 13 yards on a reception before he fumbled when hit by Bacarri Rambo. Georgia linebacker Michael Gilliard recovered at the Bulldogs' 11.

Rambo intercepted a pass from Wallace on the first play of the fourth quarter.

Georgia's win in the game called the South's oldest rivalry tied the series at 54-54-8. Georgia has won six of the last seven meetings.

4.19.18 Rick Horrow The Sports Professor talks with Joe Leccese, Chairman ProSkauer

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USA TODAY Sports

4.19.18 Rick Horrow The Sports Professor talks with Joe Leccese, Chairman ProSkauer

Rick Horrow The Sports Professor sits down for an exclusive interview with Joe Leccese -- and more from the $1 trillion-dollar business of sports in this week's 'Beyond The Scoreboard with Rick Horrow'

About the Guest: Joe Leccese is the Chairman of Proskauer. He is responsible for leading the Firm’s global operations across its 13 offices and co-heads of Proskauer’s renowned Sports Law Group.

By Rick Horrow

Podcast producer: Tanner Simkins

LISTEN HERE

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The Caps' penalty kill has been a major factor in the series turnaround

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USA TODAY Sports

The Caps' penalty kill has been a major factor in the series turnaround

For the Capitals to beat the Columbus Blue Jackets, one of the keys to the series was going to be the penalty kill. 

For the season, Columbus ranked only 25th in the league on the power play at 17.2-percent, but that number did not reflect the massive improvement the Blue Jackets made with their trade deadline acquisitions.

Since the trade deadline on Feb. 26, Columbus ranked seventh on the power play. The Caps were sixth with both teams converting 25.0-percent of the time.

Where Washington did have an edge, seemingly, was on the penalty kill. Unlike the power play, Columbus' penalty kill was consistently poor all season, finishing 27th in the NHL with a kill rate of only 76.2-percent. While not a strength by any means, the Caps were certainly better on the PK with a kill rate of 80.3-percent, good for 15th in the league.

With two power plays converting at the same rate, Washington had to be able to kill off more of the Blue Jackets' opportunities. They struggled to do that in Game 1 and Game 2.

The Caps were called for four penalties and gave up two power play goals in each of the first two games. Washington scored five power play goals in those games, but their advantage on special teams was mitigated by their inability to keep Columbus from converting. 

There are many reasons why the Caps were able to overcome the 0-2 series deficit and now sit just one win away from advancing to the second round. Chief among those reasons is the improved penalty kill. Since Game 2, Washington has not allowed a single power play goal. The PK has successfully killed off 13 straight penalties including five in Game 5.

"I think as a group, they've all stepped up," Barry Trotz said on a conference call with the media on Sunday. "I don't think I can single out anybody. They've all stepped up. The penalty kill is as good as the five guys that you have, your four and your goaltender. They've been very committed there."

In a series that has seen four out of five games go to overtime, it's not hard to recognize the impact even one goal can have on a game and, by extension, the series. Should the Caps go on to win the series, their ability to adjust their penalty kill to stop the Blue Jackets' suddenly potent power play will be one of the main reasons why.

Trotz would not go into specifics as to the adjustments the team made after Game 2, but did acknowledge the penalty kill has been a "major factor" in the Caps' turnaround this series.

But to finish the job, the penalty kill will have to continue adjusting.

"This is the time when we're still trying to tweak things," Trotz said. "They changed some things on their power play a little bit yesterday, so we'll look to maybe tweak a little bit with our PK."