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In pass-happy NFL, still helps to be able to run

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In pass-happy NFL, still helps to be able to run

ASHBURN, Va. (AP) As a wideout, Santana Moss wants Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III to throw the ball as much as possible, of course, preferably in his direction.

As a football player hoping to advance in the playoffs, Moss wants the Redskins to do what they've done as well as anyone in the NFL this season: run, run, run.

``That's big to me. Everywhere I've played and been successful, we ran the ball to pass the ball. Nowadays, a lot of teams fling the ball everywhere, and you want to be a part of that as a receiver,'' Moss said. ``But when you really want to win games, you have to have both parts of your offense working, the air and the ground. It's great to see we have that here.''

They do, indeed, thanks in part to the man known as RG3, who set a rookie QB record by running for 815 yards, and to another rookie, Alfred Morris, who finished second in the league with 1,613 yards rushing. Washington averaged an NFL-high 169.3 yards on the ground, and its opponent in the first round of the NFC playoffs Sunday is the Seattle Seahawks, who ranked No. 3 at 161.2, led by Marshawn Lynch.

Clearly, as much as the NFL is a passing league, it still helps to be able to run the ball.

``It doesn't have to be great, but you have to have an effective running game to be able to be successful,'' said two-time Super Bowl champion John Elway, now the Denver Broncos executive VP of football operations. ``The reason I say that is because, if you get leads, you've got to be able to eat clock with it and you've got to be able to keep people honest, especially pass-rushing teams.''

Elway was the quarterback and Terrell Davis was a 2,000-yard running back when the Broncos won the 1999 Super Bowl, the last time the league's leading rusher earned an NFL championship (their coach then was Mike Shanahan, currently with the Redskins). It's only happened three other times since the AFL-NFL merger in 1970, according to STATS LLC, and always by the same guy: Emmitt Smith, with the Dallas Cowboys in 1993, 1994 and 1996.

A season's leader in yards passing, by the way, never has won a Super Bowl in that span, STATS said.

The top three rushers during this regular season are in the playoffs: Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings, Morris and Lynch. Other notable running backs in action this weekend include Arian Foster of the Houston Texans and Ray Rice of the Baltimore Ravens. The top three quarterbacks in yards passing, meanwhile, are done: Drew Brees of the New Orleans Saints, Matthew Stafford of the Detroit Lions and Tony Romo of the Cowboys. Two of the top three in yards receiving also have plenty of time on their hands now: Calvin Johnson of the Lions and Brandon Marshall of the Bears.

Come playoff time, it turns out, good running performances are a better indicator of success than good passing performances.

In playoff games in the Super Bowl era, teams with a 100-yard rusher are a combined 157-37 (a winning percentage of .809), while teams with a 300-yard passer are 57-66 (only .463), according to STATS.

Admittedly, that presents something of a chicken-and-egg scenario: Did teams get a lead and win because they ran the ball well? Or did they gain a lot of yards running because they already were ahead and were trying to run out the clock?

Either way, the Vikings, Seahawks and Redskins are unabashedly putting emphasis on the ground game. Seattle led the NFL by running on 55 percent of its offense's plays, Washington was next at 52.2, and Minnesota fifth at 48.6.

``I definitely want to keep the running backs highlighted. It's started to turn into more of a spread-, quarterback-friendly NFL,'' Peterson said, ``but just keep letting them know that there are going to be running backs that can do this.''

In addition to gaining yardage on its own, a good run game opens up room for play-action fakes to help the passing game.

``Especially in playoff football, it seems like the running game always plays a bigger part. The weather gets bad, it gets windy, and things like that. The ability to run the ball and stop the run is crucial,'' Redskins defensive tackle Barry Cofield said. ``And it's what our team is built on.''

Cofield said that Shanahan's first order of business as he opens planning meetings each Wednesday is to talk about how Washington's defense fared against the run in its previous game and what needs to be done against the run in the next game.

With a struggling second-year quarterback in Christian Ponder, and a transcendent running back in Peterson (whose 2,097 yards were the second-most in NFL history), it makes sense for the Vikings to, as their coach Leslie Frazier put it, ``make no bones about it'' that they're a run-first team.

``We're always confident in our run game. We don't shy away from it, and we know that's the type of team we are,'' Vikings fullback Jerome Felton said. ``I think Coach Frazier built the team like that and we're confident in it. So, yeah, we still think the run is prevalent in this league.''

Shanahan and the man he'll try to outcoach Sunday, Seattle's Pete Carroll, both agree with that sentiment.

And both are aware that their bruising running backs - Carroll called Morris ``a hammer''; Cofield said Lynch ``runs like he's angry at everybody'' - provide a big boost to first-year quarterbacks Griffin and Russell Wilson.

``If you have the proper commitment and you build around it, it's maybe the best way you can count on being consistently successful,'' Carroll said. ``And you know that, as you're bringing up a young quarterback, there's nothing better than to run the football as they grow. ... We always want to run the football - for attitude, and just for the style of play.''

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AP Pro Football Writer Dave Campbell, AP Sports Writer Jon Krawczynski and AP National Writer Eddie Pells contributed to this report.

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Connect with Howard Fendrich on Twitter athttp://twitter.com/HowardFendrich

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Online:http://pro32.ap.org/poll andhttp://twitter.com/AP-NFL

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Ravens lose in OT after offensive struggles haunt team once again

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Ravens lose in OT after offensive struggles haunt team once again

BALTIMORE -- When the Chicago Bears weigh the good and bad facets of their performance against the Baltimore Ravens, it's likely they will come up with this conclusion:

Who cares? We won.

After blowing a 14-point lead, allowing two long kick returns and committing two turnovers, the Bears used a 40-yard field goal by Connor Barth in overtime to secure a 27-24 victory Sunday.

"You got to be able to take whatever situation you get and make something out of it," defensive end Akiem Hicks said. "I wanted to get a good W, go home and relax. The coming down to the wire thing is not my favorite style, but . however you get it, you just got to appreciate it."

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Jordan Howard ran for 167 yards, including a 53-yarder that set up the game-winning score for the Bears (2-4), whose two wins this season have come in overtime.

Howard's long run in OT put Chicago at the Baltimore 40. After rookie Mitchell Trubisky completed an 18-yard pass to Kendall Wright, Barth delivered the decisive kick.

"It wasn't always perfect -- it seldom is -- but we're just happy to get out of here with a win," Bears coach John Fox said.

Making his first career start on the road, Trubisky directed a conservative game plan that leaned heavily on the run. The first-round draft pick completed 8 of 16 passes for 113 yards and a touchdown.

"We took what the defense gave us," the rookie said. "The run game was working, so let's keep pounding the rock."

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Howard had 36 carries and the Bears gained 231 yards on 54 attempts.

"Whatever it takes to win," Fox stressed. "This week, we had to run the ball -- and we did."

Baltimore (3-3) trailed 17-3 in the third quarter and 24-16 late in regulation before capitalizing on special teams play to get back in the game.

Bobby Rainey took a kickoff 96 yards for a score to begin the comeback and Michael Campanaro brought back a punt 77 yards for a touchdown with 1:37 remaining. The 2-point conversion was successful , setting up overtime.

"Those two special teams touchdowns were huge," Ravens coach John Harbaugh said.

The Ravens weren't the only ones to capitalize on big plays. Chicago used a halfback pass from Tarik Cohen to Zach Miller for a first-half score, and Adrian Amos returned an interception 90 yards for a touchdown for a 24-13 lead with 5:08 left.

Baltimore was in position for the go-ahead score when Amos got his first career interception on a pass that bounced off the chest of receiver Chris Moore, who was covered tightly by Kyle Fuller.

Chicago forced three turnovers and frustrated quarterback Joe Flacco throughout the afternoon. Operating without injured receivers Jeremy Maclin (inactive) and Breshad Perriman (second-quarter concussion), Flacco went 24 for 41 for 180 yards with two interceptions.

Trubisky put Chicago ahead 17-3 in the third quarter with an on-the-run, 27-yard touchdown pass to tight end Dion Sims, who outfought Tony Jefferson for the ball in the end zone.

That put the Ravens in a precarious position, especially with a struggling offense.

Rainey alleviated the pressure by taking the ensuing kickoff for a touchdown. After being tripped by a teammate, Rainey popped to his feet, broke right and went the distance.

Campanaro did his part later, but it wasn't enough.

"Sometimes your special teams kick in and score two touchdowns, which is great," tight end Benjamin Watson said. "But Chicago did a better job of closing than we did."

The Ravens were coming off a 30-17 win in Oakland in which they did not commit a turnover, didn't allow a sack and were penalized only once.

In this one, Baltimore gave the ball away twice, permitted two sacks and was flagged five times -- in the first half.

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Ravens vs. Bears: Date, time, TV channel, how to watch, online stream

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USA TODAY Sports

Ravens vs. Bears: Date, time, TV channel, how to watch, online stream

The Ravens got a crucial 30-17 road win on Sunday against the Raiders and are looking to keep that momentum going.

Right off the bat, Joe Flacco threw a 52-yard pass to Mike Wallace that ultimately lead the Ravens to taking a 7-0 lead within minutes. That was pretty much the tone for the rest of the game. Flacco threw for 222 yards and completed 19 of 26 passes.

One major blow was star running back Terrance West being carted to the locker room during the first drive with a calf injury. He did not return to the game.

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Overall, the Ravens' offense connected on all fronts. Mike Wallace, Breshad Perriman and Jeremy Maclin all made crucial catches after the Ravens couldn't get anything going in their last two games against the Jaguars and Steelers.

They are facing a struggling Bears team who has turned to rookie quarterback Mitchell Trubisky after starting quarterback Mike Glennon has had more fumbles and interceptions than he has touchdowns. Trubisky is set to make his first start Monday night against the Minnesota Vikings.

Their only win has been in Week 3 against the Steelers. They currently rank 26th in the league in passing yards but 11th in rushing yards, something the Ravens defense should have no issue stopping.

Ahead of the Ravens' game against the Bears, here's everything you need to know to watch.

Week 5 Ravens vs. Bears game info:

Who: Baltimore Ravens vs. Chicago Bears

What: Week 6 NFL regular season 

When: 1:00 p.m.. ET, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017

Where: M&T Bank Stadium, Baltimore, Maryland

TV Channel: FOX

Live Stream: NFL Game Pass, FOX Sports Go

Radio: WBAL New Radio 1090 

Point Spread: Baltimore, -6.5

Over/Under: 39.5

Weather: 84 degrees, partly cloudy

BALTIMORE RAVENS 2017 REGULAR SEASON SCHEDULE:

Week 1 (Sun, Sept. 10): 20-0  at Cincinnati Bengals (W)

Week 2 (Sun, Sept. 17): 24-10 vs. Cleveland Browns (W)

Week 3 (Sun, Sept. 24): 44-7 vs. Jacksonville Jaguars (in London) (L)

Week 4 (Sun, Oct. 1): vs. Pittsburgh Steelers, 1:00 p.m. (L)

Week 5 (Sun, Oct. 8): at Oakland Raiders, 4:05 p.m. (W)

Week 6 (Sun, Oct. 15): vs Chicago Bears, 1:00 p.m.

Week 7 (Sun, Oct. 22): at Minnesota Vikings, 1:00 p.m.

Week 8 (Thur, Oct. 26): vs. Miami Dolphins, 8:25 p.m.

Week 9 (Sun, Nov. 5): at Tennessee Titans, 1:00 p.m.

Week 10 (Sun, Nov. 12): BYE week

Week 11 (Sun, Nov. 19): at Green Bay Packers, 1:00 p.m.

Week 12 (Mon, Nov. 27): vs. Houston Texans, 8:30 p.m.

Week 13 (Sun, Dec. 3): vs. Detroit Lions, 1:00 p.m.

Week 14 (Sun, Dec. 10): at Pittsburgh Steelers, 8:30 p.m.

Week 15  (Sun, Dec. 17): at Cleveland Browns, 1:00 p.m.

Week 16 (Sat, Dec. 23): vs Indianapolis Colts, 4:30 p.m.

Week 17 (Sun, Dec. 31): vs. Cincinnati Bengals, 1:00 p.m