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Bass and Garnett help Celtics over Wizards in OT

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Bass and Garnett help Celtics over Wizards in OT

BOSTON (AP) Brandon Bass scored five straight points in overtime, helping the Boston Celtics pull out a 100-94 win over the Washington Wizards on the back end of a home-and-home Wednesday night.

Kevin Garnett led the Celtics with 20 points and 13 rebounds, Rajon Rondo had 18 points and 14 assists and reserve Jason Terry had 16 points. Bass finished with 11.

Bradley Beal, Kevin Seraphin and Martell Webster each scored 16 points for the Wizards (0-3).

Bass hit a tiebreaking free throw, making it 93-92, then scored on a twisting layup on the next possession. He added a breakaway dunk with 37.7 seconds left to help seal it.

Boston (2-2) beat the Wizards 89-86 in Washington on Saturday night.

Reserve Chris Singleton's clean drive down the lane for a dunk tied the game with 9.4 seconds left. Rondo then missed a jumper as the horn sounded, sending the game to OT.

Beal's 3-pointer from the top of the key had given the Wizards an 83-82 lead with 68 seconds left, and they made it 84-82 when Webster hit a free throw after Garnett was whistled for a technical.

But Garnett was fouled on Boston's ensuing possession and hit both free throws, tying it. Pierce then stole the ball from Seraphin at midcourt and was fouled, hitting the first of two to push Boston ahead 85-84.

After Webster turned the ball over trying to drive the lane, Rondo hit one of two free throws to make it 86-84 with 27 seconds left.

Singleton nailed two free throws tying it at 86 before Rondo hit a 20-foot jumper from the top of the key to push Boston back in front.

Boston had taken a 71-60 lead with just over 10 minutes to play on Paul Pierce's three-point play, coming on just his second basket of the game, when he was fouled on a fast-break layup. The Wizards then climbed back mostly behind the play of Singleton, who scored six of Washington's eight points as it narrowed the gap to 77-76 on Webster's 3 with 5:19 left.

After Terry nailed a 3 for Boston, the Wizards scored the next four points, tying it 80-all on Seraphin's dunk with 3 1/2 minutes to play.

The Celtics had trailed by seven in a first half that mostly featured poor shooting and sluggish play - except when Garnett was on the floor - but scored the initial five points after the break to tie the game at 42.

Garnett had 10 rebounds, two blocked shots and seven points in the first half and the Celtics outscored the Wizards by 11 when he was on the floor.

Washington pulled to a 49-44 lead midway into the third quarter on Beal's three-point play before Boston closed the quarter by scoring 12 of the final 14 points to grab a 66-58 lead entering the final quarter. Chris Wilcox, still working back into shape after heart surgery last season, sparked the run with six points and Terry had a pair of baskets.

Washington shot just 29 percent in the opening quarter and trailed 21-16 at the break, but used a 20-7 run midway into the second en route to a 42-37 halftime edge.

NOTES: Garnett had 10 rebounds in just his first 7:09 of play, collecting his 10th only 16 seconds into the second quarter. ... Wizards C Nene was out again with plantar fascists of his left foot. He hasn't played yet this season. ... Washington G Jordan Crawford, who tweaked his ankle in the loss to Boston Saturday, returned to action. ... Boston rookie F Jared Sullinger started his second straight game and coach Doc Rivers had a simple answer why. ``We're playing the same team,'' he said. ... The Celtics host Philadelphia Friday before playing four of five on the road. ... The Celtics were given a delay of game warning because Garnett wasn't ready for the tip, going through his usual pregame ritual when he goes under one of the baskets and slightly bangs his head against a padded support to get motivated.

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Dan Fegan, former agent for John Wall, dies in car crash

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Photo by Jerritt Clark/Getty Images for Caravan

Dan Fegan, former agent for John Wall, dies in car crash

NBA agent Dan Fegan, who had previously represented many high-profile NBA clients - including John Wall - died in a car crash Sunday morning, according to The Aspen Times. 

According to the report, Fegan's SUV was struck by a bus while trying to merge onto Highway 82 in Colorado a little after 9am this morning. 

The two passengers in the car - an unidentified woman and Fegan's 5-year old daughter - were airlifted to a nearby hospital with serious injuries. 

Fegan was 56.

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The human side of the NHL's trade deadline

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USA TODAY Sports

The human side of the NHL's trade deadline

Congratulations! You just got a new job. There’s just one catch: it’s in a new city.

Oh, and by the way, you start tomorrow. Good luck.

That would be a pretty big shock for anyone, but it is the reality that hockey players constantly face and one that is exacerbated as the trade deadline approaches.

“I know fans and media get really excited about it, but they're not the ones that have to pick up and move their families,” Brooks Orpik said following Sunday’s practice. “I think players are looked at as kind of objects at times, just a number. People don't know there's a human side to trades.”

This season’s NHL trade deadline is 3 p.m. on Monday. Until then, every locker room faces a degree of uncertainty.

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Almost no player or prospect is untouchable. Even if there are no rumors surrounding a team or things seem set, the threat of a trade hangs over the heads of the players like the sword of Damocles until the deadline finally comes and goes.

Even for those players who know they won’t be moved or who can’t be moved because of various clauses in their contracts, it still remains a stressful time as they could still see friends shipped to another city.

“I think what happens on that day is all the players, as soon as they get off the ice at morning skate, they're all looking at their phones and trying to see what happens,” Barry Trotz said. “They want to see what happens around the league.”

Sure, a player can go from a last place team to a contender. On the surface, they should be happy. Behind the scenes, however, midseason trades always carry family implications.

“It's tough on guys,” Orpik said. “Guys have kids in schools or have roots in the community of the teams they play for. As fun as it is for some people, I think as players it can definitely be nerve-wracking for people.”

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When those trades do happen, they obviously can throw a player’s life upside-down.

For those players who are not traded, the team has to adjust both to losing familiar faces and to embracing new ones into the locker room.

“When someone comes into a new group, it's not much changed except for obviously a new piece,” Jay Beagle said. “But it's definitely harder on them so you try to make it as easy as possible on them.”

Thus far, the Capitals have added defensemen Michal Kempny and Jakub Jerabek over the past week. While both trades were done in exchange for draft picks, Taylor Chorney was a casualty of the trades as he was placed on waivers to make room for the new additions and was claimed by the Columbus Blue Jackets.

“It's tough losing guys, especially guys that are well-liked in our room,” Orpik said. “Taylor Chorney is a really well-liked guy so I think that impacted us a little bit.”

On Monday, fans, analysts, players and coaches alike will all be frantically checking their phones looking for the latest trade news, but while the deadline brings excitement for fans, it bears very different feelings for the players involved. Those players are people working a job and those trades mean uprooting their life in a matter of days. Regardless of whether a player is better off in terms of the team situation, there is still a human cost to doing business.

“It can affect certain guys because their names are obviously spread all over the place,” Trotz said. “They're human too. They pretend to not hear it, but they do.”