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Browns interview former assistant Trestman

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Browns interview former assistant Trestman

CLEVELAND (AP) The Browns' coaching search turned toward one of their former assistants.

And, three other ex-Cleveland coaches somehow got pulled into the mix.

On Tuesday, the team interviewed Marc Trestman, the current coach of the Montreal Alouettes and Cleveland's offensive coordinator the last time the Browns played in the AFC title game, a person familiar with the meeting told the Associated Press.

Trestman interviewed with Chicago on Monday and arrived at the Browns' facility in suburban Berea Tuesday morning, said the person who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the search. He is the fifth known candidate to interview with the Browns, seeking their sixth fulltime coach since 1999 after firing Pat Shurmur last week.

Trestman was the Browns' quarterbacks coach in 1988 and offensive coordinator in 1989, when Cleveland appeared in its third AFC championship in four years with quarterback Bernie Kosar. Trestman has extensive background as an NFL assistant, working with eight teams, most recently Miami in 2004.

Also, the Browns asked permission to speak with Indianapolis offensive coordinator Bruce Arians, who worked as Butch Davis' offensive coordinator in Cleveland from 2001-03. Arians was admitted to an Indianapolis hospital for treatment of an inner ear infection that caused him to miss Sunday's playoff game in Baltimore, ESPN reported.

Two other former Browns assistants made news as Nick Saban all but ruled out a return to the NFL, while Bill Cowher told Newsday he wants to coach again at some point.

Trestman has spent the past five seasons with Montreal, leading the Alouettes to two Grey Cup titles. The 56-year-old also worked as an offensive coordinator with San Francisco, Arizona and Oakland. The Raiders went to the Super Bowl at the end of the 2002 season in the offense Trestman geared for QB Rich Gannon.

In recent years, Trestman has worked as a consultant in the NFL and in the offseason helped develop young quarterbacks, including Cleveland's Brandon Weeden, whose future with the Browns will be determined by the club's next coach.

``Marc is an extremely knowledgeable football mind and with his obvious success everywhere he has been proves that he knows how to develop and teach quarterbacks,'' Weeden said in a testimonial on Trestman's website.

The Browns are not commenting on any of their interviews or candidates.

Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and CEO Joe Banner are in the second week looking for a coach. They've interviewed several coaching candidates and are expected to meet with more this week. Trestman's interview was the first to take place in Cleveland.

Arians, too, has had success working with young QBs. He helped groom Ben Roethlisberger into a Super Bowl winner with Pittsburgh, and this season mentored rookie Andrew Luck as the Colts went on a surprising run to the postseason.

Haslam and Banner conducted several interviews last week in Arizona. They spent the most significant time with Chip Kelly, who decided to return to Oregon. The Browns also interviewed former Arizona coach Ken Whisenhunt, Cardinals defensive coordinator Ray Horton, former Syracuse coach Doug Marrone, who was hired by Buffalo, and Penn State's Bill O'Brien.

If the team was even thinking about contacting Saban about its vacancy, Alabama's coach made it clear the NFL is in his past - not his future.

The Browns may have considered calling Saban, who coached in Miami for two years before taking over the Crimson Tide's program. However, fresh off winning his third national title in four years, the 61-year-old reiterated that he's content at Alabama and outlined several reasons why he prefers the college game.

Saban worked as an assistant in Cleveland under Bill Belichick, and there has long been speculation he might one day return to the Browns. He did his best to end that discussion for good on the morning after Alabama's 42-14 throttling of Notre Dame.

Saban bristled while addressing speculation that he would take another turn in the pros.

``I didn't feel like I could impact the team the same way that I can as a college coach in terms of affecting people's lives personally, helping them develop careers by graduating from school, off the field, by helping develop them as football players,'' Saban said. ``And there's a lot of self-gratification in all that, all right?

``So I kind of learned through that experience that maybe this is where I belong, and I'm really happy and at peace with all that. So no matter how many times I say that, y'all don't believe it, so I don't even know why I keep talking about it.''

The timing of Cowher's comments are interesting. With five teams still looking for a coach, Cowher said at a CBS function to promote coverage of the Super Bowl that he probably will return to the NFL.

``It would be a challenge,'' said Cowher, who has been a broadcaster since leaving the Steelers in 2006, ``but I think that's probably why I would get back into it, because of the challenge.''

Cowher played linebacker for the Browns before he was an assistant on Marty Schottenheimer's staff. He dismissed the idea the game has changed too much since he left.

``I did it for 27 years,'' he said. ``You don't just forget things overnight. ``

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Capitals Extra Podcast: Trade deadline story time with Alan May

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Report: Former Terp Diamond Stone included in federal documents detailing NCAA violations

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USA Today Sports

Report: Former Terp Diamond Stone included in federal documents detailing NCAA violations

A bombshell article published Friday morning by Pat Forde and Pete Thamel of Yahoo! Sports details potential NCAA violations involving more than 20 schools and 25 players.

Several of the biggest names and programs in college basketball were referenced in the Yahoo! report, including former Maryland Terrapin, Diamond Stone.

According to documents and bank records that are part of an FBI investigation, Stone received $14,303 while a freshman at Maryland, a clear violation of NCAA rules. 

Former NBA agent Andy Miller of ASM Sports was the primary handler dishing out incentives, which included cash advances, entertainment expenses and travel expenses for high school and college prospects.

Other players referenced in the documents include Dennis Smith who played at North Carolina State, Isaiah Whitehead from Seton Hall, DeMatha star Markelle Fultz who played at Washington and Edrice "Bam" Adebayo who went on to play at Kentucky. 

Player's and their families from Duke, Michigan State, USC, North Carolina, Texas and Alabama were also included.

Stone played for the Terps during the 2015-16 season before declaring for the 2016 NBA Draft. He was selected 40th overall by the New Orleans Pelicans and traded to the Los Angeles Clippers. 

RELATED: DIAMOND STONE ADMITS TO 'MISTAKES' DURING FRESHMAN YEAR AT MARYLAND

Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon postponed Friday morning's media availability, but he did release the following statement through the school.

"Late last night we were alerted of a report associating one of our former student-athletes with an agent. We are extremely disappointed, and we will fully cooperate with any investigation. I do not have a relationship with Andy Miller or anyone from his agency, and at no time have I ever had a conversation with Andy Miller or his agency regarding any Maryland basketball player. We remain steadfast in upholding a program of integrity that reflects the values of our University community."

Stone did end up signing with a different agency.

While this is still under investigation, large consequences for the NCAA can be expected.

The NCAA also released a statement following the news. 

These allegations, if true, point to systematic failures that must be fixed and fixed now if we want college sports in America. Simply put, people who engage in this kind of behavior have no place in college sports. They are an affront to all those who play by the rules. Following the Southern District of New York's indictments last year, the NCAA Board of Governors and I formed the independent Commission on College Basketball, chaired by Condoleezza Rice, to provide recommendations on how to clean up the sport. With these latest allegations, it's clear this work is more important now than ever. The Board and I are completely committed to making transformational changes to the game and ensuring all involved in college basketball do so with integrity. We also will continue to cooperate with the efforts of federal prosecutors to identify and punish the unscrupulous parties seeking to exploit the system through criminal acts.