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Judge: US women's soccer team bound by no-strike clause


Judge: US women's soccer team bound by no-strike clause


CHICAGO (AP) -- A federal judge in Chicago ruled Friday that the world champion U.S. women's soccer team does not have the right to strike to seek improved conditions and wages before the Summer Olympics, concluding the team remains bound by a no-strike clause in earlier agreements.

The case pits the team's union, the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team Players Association, against the Chicago-based governing body, the U.S. Soccer Federation. The federation sued to clarify the strike issue.

The federation warned that a strike could have forced the women to pull out of the Olympics, which, it said, would have hurt the development of the sport in the U.S. The union wanted the option of striking, though it hadn't said definitively that it would strike.

The women's team is seeking its fourth straight Olympic gold medal in Rio de Janeiro.

The lawsuit focused on strike rights is related to a wage discrimination complaint filed by five players in March with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The complaint alleges that the women players in some cases earn as much as four times less than their counterparts on the men's national team.

U.S. Soccer maintains that characterization is misleading because the men and women are paid differently under collective bargaining agreements and because the complaint's allegation that the women generate more revenue is based on figures from last year, when the team won the World Cup and went on a victory tour.

Oral arguments before U.S. District Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman last week focused on whether an existing agreement between the union and the federation bars the women from striking. The federation has said a collective bargaining agreement for all purposes remains in effect until Dec. 31, while the union says any such agreement has already expired.

In her 13-page ruling, posted Friday, the judge says the union didn't persuade her that terms of an earlier collective bargaining agreement -- including a no-strike clause -- did not carry over when the sides signed a memorandum of understanding seeking to clarify contractual terms in 2103. Coleman was dismissive of union arguments that a no-strike provision should have been spelled out explicitly in the memorandum.

"Federal law encourages courts to be liberal in their recognition and interpretation of collective bargaining agreements, so as to lessen strife and encourage congenial relations between unions and companies," she wrote. "A collective bargaining agreement may be partly or wholly oral and a written collective bargaining agreement may be orally modified."

Federation lawyer Russell Sauer Jr. said during oral arguments that a no-strike clause is implied in the still-valid memorandum of understanding. A lawyer for the union balked, saying the federation failed to secure a no-strike clause in writing and cannot argue now that such a provision is implied.

Asked by the judge why the federation did not insist on a no-strike clause in the memorandum, another federation lawyer, Amy Quartarolo, said it was made clear in emails and other communications that a no-strike provision in previous CBAs carried over into the 2013 agreement. In her ruling, Judge Coleman indicated that she largely agreed with that contention.

The Olympic Games, which the women's team qualified for earlier this year, start in Brazil on Aug. 5. The American women won the World Cup with a 5-2 victory over Japan in Canada last year.

The union hadn't formally identified grievances that might trigger a strike. Many players, however, have voiced concern over gender equity in soccer. Some pointed to the artificial turf the women had to play on in Canada, pointing out the men's World Cup is played on natural grass.

US out of World Cup contention with 2-1 loss at Trinidad


US out of World Cup contention with 2-1 loss at Trinidad

COUVA, Trinidad -- The United States was eliminated from World Cup contention Tuesday night, a shocking loss at Trinidad ending the Americans' streak of seven straight appearances at soccer's showcase.

Twenty-eight years after a stunning victory here put the Americans back in the World Cup following a four-decade absence, their chances for next year's tournament in Russia ended on this island nation off the coast of Venezuela.

Trinidad and Tobago scored a pair of first-half goals, and the United States was eliminated with a 2-1 defeat -- its first time missing the World Cup since 1986.

Shocked American players slumped on the bench, and Matt Besler sat on the field after the final whistle as Panama's game ended and then Costa Rica's. At the end, dejected U.S. players filed into their locker rooms with blank looks.

The U.S. entered its final qualifier with a berth uncertain for the first time since 1989. Home losses to Mexico last November and Costa Rica left the Americans little margin for error.

The 28th-ranked Americans needed merely a tie against 99th-ranked Trinidad, which lost its sixth straight qualifier last week. But the defeat -- coupled with Honduras' come-from-behind 3-2 win over Mexico and Panama's 2-1 victory over Costa Rica on Ramon Torres' 88th-minute goal -- dropped the Americans from third place into fifth in the six-nation final round of the North and Central American and Caribbean region.

Mexico and Costa Rica already had clinched berths, and Panama claimed the third and final automatic spot and will go the World Cup for the first time. Honduras will meet Australia in a two-game playoff next month for another spot at next year's 32-nation tournament.

Missing the World Cup is a devastating blow to the U.S. Soccer Federation, which has steadily built the sport in the last quarter-century with the help of sponsors and television partners. It also is a trauma for Fox, which broadcasts the next three World Cups after taking the U.S. rights from ESPN. The USSF hopes to co-host the 2026 tournament with Mexico and Canada, and Morocco is the only other bidder.

After an 0-2 start in the hexagonal last fall under Jurgen Klinsmann, the USSF replaced him last November with Bruce Arena, the American coach from 1998-2006. The team revived with home wins over Honduras and Trinidad last spring and draws at Panama and Mexico. But the 2-0 defeat to Costa Rica in New Jersey at the start of Labor Day weekend proved one hurdle too many to overcome.

"No excuses for us not getting the second goal and at least a point," Arena said. "It's a blemish for us."

The Americans fell behind in the 17th minute when defender Omar Gonzalez made a casual attempt with his left foot to clear Alvin Jones' cross and sent the ball looping over the outstretched right arm of goalkeeper Tim Howard from 18 yards.

Jones doubled the lead in the 37th with a 35-yard strike, again to Howard's upper right corner, and nearly scored another in the 44th when his swerving shot bounced off Howard's chest and spilled into the penalty area.

Christian Pulisic, the Americans' 19-year-old star midfielder, scored in the 47th minute from the arc with a right-footed shot. He played a role in 12 of the 17 Americans goals in the hexagonal.

One minute later, Howard made a kick save on Shahdon Winchester's short-range shot, and DeAndre Yedlin blocked Levi Garcia's follow-up attempt.

The U.S. bench was tense, as Honduras scored twice early in the second half to take the lead over visiting Mexico in the 60th minute and Panama tied the score against visiting Costa Rica in the 52nd.

Clint Dempsey, who entered at the start of the second half, was denied by goalkeeper Adrian Foncette's leaping save in the 69th and hit a post from 22 yards in the 77th. Pulisic's shot in the 87th was saved by Foncette.

All American reserves were standing for much of the final minutes, and Arena had repeated exasperated looks.

Just a few hundred fans were in the stands at 10,000-capacity Ato Boldon Stadium, located 24 miles south of the capital, Port-of-Spain. Paul Caligiuri's famous goal at the National Stadium in 1989 put the U.S. in the World Cup for the first time since 1950.

Among the spectators were a few dozen American Outlaws, the U.S. supporters group.

Water that had flooded the track surrounding the field ahead of the U.S. training session Monday was gone.

D.C. United beat Revolution for third-straight win

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D.C. United beat Revolution for third-straight win

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Luciano Acosta scored off a volley from close range in the 71st minute and D.C. United beat the New England Revolution 1-0 on Saturday night for their third straight victory.

D.C. United (8-15-4) has won all three games 1-0, with the first two coming on own goals. Bill Hamid had his third consecutive shutout.

D.C. United is 8-0-0 when Acosta scores. Kofi Opare and Lloyd Sam assisted on the goal. D.C. hasn't lost to New England in its last seven games, going 4-0-3.

New England's (8-12-5) had scored in six straight road games.