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Homer-happy O's beat Cleveland

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Homer-happy O's beat Cleveland

CLEVELAND (AP) -- Jim Thome hit his 610th career homer to move into seventh place on the career list and the Baltimore Orioles pounded out a 10-2 victory over the Cleveland Indians on Friday night.

Thome passed Sammy Sosa on the career list with a towering 418-foot shot off Derek Lowe (8-8) to open the fourth inning.

Ryan Flaherty had a three-run homer and Mark Reynolds doubled home two runs in a six-run third for Baltimore, which won its third straight.

Miguel Gonzalez (2-1) gave up seven hits over 6 2-3 innings in his third career start. The right-hander struck out five and is 1-0 with a 2.14 ERA on the road.

Asdrubal Cabrera and Jack Hannahan homered for Cleveland, which has lost six of its last nine.

Orioles reliever Matt Lindstrom was hit in the left knee by a wicked line drive by Johnny Damon in the eighth. He wanted to stay in the game, but with a 10-2 lead, manager Buck Showalter brought in Kevin Gregg with the bases loaded and two outs and Lindstrom walked to the dugout.

Thome's homer into the right-field seats was his sixth this season and first since being acquired by Baltimore on July 1 from the Philadelphia Phillies for two minor-leaguers. He had signed with the Phillies as a free agent last winter.

It also was the 41-year-old slugger's 189th homer at Progressive Field. The left-handed slugger holds Cleveland's career record with 337 homers. He was a key part of the Indians' power-laden lineup from 1991 through 2002 and returned for the final two months of the 2011 season.

Ken Griffey Jr. is next on the career list with 630 homers.

Thome had three hits, including his 449th career double, tying Hall of Famer Joe Morgan and two others for 97th all-time. He also struck out for the 2,526th time, leaving him 61 behind career leader Reggie Jackson.

Baltimore took a 1-0 lead in the first on a wild pitch by Lowe. J.J. Hardy hit a one-out double, moved up on a groundout by Thome and scored when Adam Jones walked on a pitch that got past catcher Matt Wieters.

Cleveland tied it in the bottom half on Cabrera's 12th homer. Hannahan hit his fourth in the seventh to make it 10-2.

Lowe allowed nine runs and seven hits over three-plus innings. He walked five without a strikeout.

The right-hander was the Indians' best starter in the first two months of the season, but the 39-year-old veteran is 2-7 with an 8.31 ERA in his last 10 starts -- allowing 48 earned runs and 75 hits in 52 innings.

Reynolds went 1 for 5 and is hitting .304 with eight RBIs over six games after going 10 for 66 (.152) with seven RBIs in his previous 22 contests.

NOTES: Baltimore acquired INF Omar Quintanilla from the New York Mets for cash. He was designated for assignment by the Mets on Tuesday and is expected to join the Orioles on Saturday after a roster spot is cleared for him. ... Indians LHP Rafael Perez, out since April 26 with a sore shoulder, threw a bullpen session and is scheduled to resume a minor-league rehab assignment Monday. ... Cleveland RHP Cody Allen made his major-league debut, working one inning in relief. The 23rd-round draft pick in 2011 was called up from Triple-A Columbus as the Indians optioned out LHP Scott Barnes. ... Hannahan moved from third base to shortstop in the seventh -- for his sixth career appearance at the position. ... Cleveland leads the series 24-16 since 2007. The Indians took three of four in Baltimore, June 28-July 1.

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Dan Fegan, former agent for John Wall, dies in car crash

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Photo by Jerritt Clark/Getty Images for Caravan

Dan Fegan, former agent for John Wall, dies in car crash

NBA agent Dan Fegan, who had previously represented many high-profile NBA clients including John Wall, died in a car crash Sunday morning, according to The Aspen Times. 

According to the report, Fegan's SUV was struck by a bus while trying to merge onto Highway 82 in Colorado a little after 9 am this morning. 

The two passengers in the car - an unidentified woman and Fegan's 5-year old daughter - were airlifted to a nearby hospital with serious injuries. 

Fegan was 56.

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The human side of the NHL's trade deadline

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USA TODAY Sports

The human side of the NHL's trade deadline

Congratulations! You just got a new job. There’s just one catch: it’s in a new city.

Oh, and by the way, you start tomorrow. Good luck.

That would be a pretty big shock for anyone, but it is the reality that hockey players constantly face and one that is exacerbated as the trade deadline approaches.

“I know fans and media get really excited about it, but they're not the ones that have to pick up and move their families,” Brooks Orpik said following Sunday’s practice. “I think players are looked at as kind of objects at times, just a number. People don't know there's a human side to trades.”

This season’s NHL trade deadline is 3 p.m. on Monday. Until then, every locker room faces a degree of uncertainty.

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Almost no player or prospect is untouchable. Even if there are no rumors surrounding a team or things seem set, the threat of a trade hangs over the heads of the players like the sword of Damocles until the deadline finally comes and goes.

Even for those players who know they won’t be moved or who can’t be moved because of various clauses in their contracts, it still remains a stressful time as they could still see friends shipped to another city.

“I think what happens on that day is all the players, as soon as they get off the ice at morning skate, they're all looking at their phones and trying to see what happens,” Barry Trotz said. “They want to see what happens around the league.”

Sure, a player can go from a last place team to a contender. On the surface, they should be happy. Behind the scenes, however, midseason trades always carry family implications.

“It's tough on guys,” Orpik said. “Guys have kids in schools or have roots in the community of the teams they play for. As fun as it is for some people, I think as players it can definitely be nerve-wracking for people.”

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When those trades do happen, they obviously can throw a player’s life upside-down.

For those players who are not traded, the team has to adjust both to losing familiar faces and to embracing new ones into the locker room.

“When someone comes into a new group, it's not much changed except for obviously a new piece,” Jay Beagle said. “But it's definitely harder on them so you try to make it as easy as possible on them.”

Thus far, the Capitals have added defensemen Michal Kempny and Jakub Jerabek over the past week. While both trades were done in exchange for draft picks, Taylor Chorney was a casualty of the trades as he was placed on waivers to make room for the new additions and was claimed by the Columbus Blue Jackets.

“It's tough losing guys, especially guys that are well-liked in our room,” Orpik said. “Taylor Chorney is a really well-liked guy so I think that impacted us a little bit.”

On Monday, fans, analysts, players and coaches alike will all be frantically checking their phones looking for the latest trade news, but while the deadline brings excitement for fans, it bears very different feelings for the players involved. Those players are people working a job and those trades mean uprooting their life in a matter of days. Regardless of whether a player is better off in terms of the team situation, there is still a human cost to doing business.

“It can affect certain guys because their names are obviously spread all over the place,” Trotz said. “They're human too. They pretend to not hear it, but they do.”