Georgetown Hoyas

Jason Kidd determined to fight DWI charge

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Jason Kidd determined to fight DWI charge

From Comcast SportsNetSOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) -- New York Knicks point guard Jason Kidd intends to fight a charge that he was drunk when he crashed his SUV into a telephone pole in the Hamptons over the summer, his lawyer said Wednesday.Kidd, wearing a navy pinstriped suit and tie, said "good morning" to reporters outside Southampton Town Court on Long Island. But he didn't speak as he stood, back straight, facing the judge during his brief procedural appearance.When asked about the allegations, attorney Edward Burke Jr. told reporters, "We are defending that.""He is taking this very, very seriously," Burke said. "He wants to get this past him as quickly as possible. The legal process takes some time but he is ready for his season."Kidd was arrested in July, days after signing with the Knicks. He suffered minor injuries when the vehicle hit the pole and veered into the woods in the hamlet of Water Mill.The misdemeanor charge carries the potential for up to a year in jail.A few days after his arrest, Kidd said on Twitter that he regretted "any disruption my accident ... may have caused members of the community." He also said he wanted to "thank the local authorities."In another posting, Kidd thanked his family and friends for their support.The Knicks signed Kidd away from the Dallas Mavericks in a 3 million a year deal. Kidd had played in New Jersey, leading the Nets to two NBA Finals appearances, before being traded to Dallas.He helped the Mavericks win the 2011 NBA championship. Kidd is second on the NBA's career list in assists and steals.The two-time Olympic gold medalist has been in trouble with the law before. While playing with Phoenix in 2001, he was arrested on a domestic violence charge and acknowledged that he struck his former wife.His next court appearance is Nov. 7.

Hoyas, Patrick Ewing remain undefeated, beat Maryland-Eastern Shore

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Hoyas, Patrick Ewing remain undefeated, beat Maryland-Eastern Shore

WASHINGTON -- Jessie Govan had his third straight double-double, Marcus Derrickson had the third of his career and Georgetown remained unbeaten under former star Patrick Ewing with an 83-57 win over Maryland-Eastern Shore on Saturday.

Kaleb Johnson scored a career-high 24 points for the Hoyas (3-0) on 9-of-13 shooting, including four 3-pointers. Govan had 23 points, making 10 of 15 shots, and grabbed 14 rebounds, and Derrickson had 14 points and 10 boards.

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With Johnson making his first three treys and going 7 of 9 from the field for 14 points, Georgetown raced to a 40-19 lead at the half. Derrickson and Govan had 3-point plays to help Georgetown open a 10-0 lead and the Hoyas had runs of nine and eight to lead 35-8 before the Hawks, who were 6 of 23 at that point, closed the half with an 11-5 run.

Miryne Thomas led the Hawks (1-2) with 16 points and Ahmad Frost had 14.

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The NBA wants to end the one-and-done rule and the timing is right

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The NBA wants to end the one-and-done rule and the timing is right

The NBA is building momentum towards a significant change in their draft entry rules. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has been outspoken about his preference to change the so-called one-and-done rule and on Thursday he met with the newly created Commission on College Basketball in Washington, D.C. to discuss the subject.

The meeting was first reported by ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski, who says the league could once again let high school players be drafted. The compromise could be a rule requiring those who go to college to stay for at least two years. That would be similar to Major League Baseball, which stipulates three years of college.

Would a similar rule be a good idea for the NBA? While the players' union would like the option to go straight from high school, there was a reason the one-and-done rule was implemented in the 2006 collective bargaining agreement. The perception back then was that players left for the NBA too early and many flamed out because of it. The thought was that some players would have had better careers if they were older and more experienced when they became professionals.

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Darius Miles, Kwame Brown, Eddy Curry and Sebastian Telfair are notorious cases of draft busts who came out of high school. Many wondered if those guys would have been better off with a year in college to adjust to life on their own and with an intermediary step up in competition.

But there are important differences in the NBA's structure nowadays. Now there is a robust minor league system with G-League affiliates all over the country. There are also two-way contracts, allowing teams to pay more money to a prospect and have more flexibility in bringing them up to the NBA. Players don't have to adjust as quickly as they used to.

The G-League is going to continue to expand and the perception keeps changing. Now, it is more common to see players have a stint in the G-League either for development purposes or injury rehabilitation. Player development of baseball players is different, but the MLB's well-established minor league system is the reason why their rule allowing high school players to go pro really works.

The one year in college under the one-and-done rule, however, does have some positives. Most notably, it allows NBA teams to get a better read on draft prospects. Instead of evaluating guys exclusively in high school and AAU, they get to see them play in the ACC, SEC and other big college conferences.

NBA front offices may be hurt by it, but the time is right to go back to high school players entering the pros. Things are much different than they were in 2006 and the league can handle it. Ending the one-and-done rule would be better for the players and it should also make a lot of college basketball fans happy.

That is the good of what the NBA is considering, however, the rule requiring two years of college should not be part of the equation. If the NBA wants to grant some freedom, then actually do it. Some players may need just one year of college and nothing more. Don't punish them for it.

The two-year requirement seems like a very bad idea, but it could be part of the deal. Either way, it seems like the one-and-done rule could come to an end sooner than later and it's for the best.

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