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In McGloin, PSU developed model walk-on for future

In McGloin, PSU developed model walk-on for future

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) In quarterback Matt McGloin, coach Bill O'Brien found the shining example of how much a former walk-on can succeed at Penn State.

A year for McGloin that included school records for career touchdown passes and single-season passing yards ended with the senior winning the Burlsworth Trophy, an award given to the top college player who started his career as a walk-on.

Perfect timing for a program that may need to rely on walk-ons more over the next few seasons. Scholarship cuts that are part of the NCAA sanctions for the school's handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal start taking effect in 2013.

``I did realize throughout the season that I could be the face of the program and help out walk-ons everywhere,'' McGloin said this week. ``It's not how you get there - it's what you do when you get there.''

The award comes with a bit of irony for McGloin, who has been vocal throughout his career about disliking the term ``walk-on.'' The fifth-year senior did go on scholarship about 11 months after arriving at Penn State in 2008.

``It's unfair in a way due to the fact that I've done everything that a scholarship kid has done here, but what people don't understand is that as a walk-on you have to work twice as hard to earn your keep,'' McGloin said.

He certainly made a name for himself this season.

He broke the school record with 46 career touchdown passes, throwing 24 in 2012 to tie Daryll Clark (2009) for the Nittany Lions' single-season mark.

The season is over despite an 8-4 record and second-place finish in the Big Ten Leaders Division because the sanctions also included a four-year postseason ban. But the better-than-expected record and the Nittany Lions' fiery, blue-collar mentality under first-year coach Bill O'Brien have left a lasting impression with high school coaches like Central Dauphin's Glen McNamee. One of McNamee's players, former walk-on Derek Day, ended up starting a game at running back and becoming a special teams ace.

Tight end Matt Lehman also came to Penn State a walk-on from Newport, in central Pennsylvania, and emerged into a pass-catching threat in O'Brien's new passing offense orchestrated by McGloin. Senior safety Jacob Fagnano arrived at Penn State as a walk-on from Williamsport and ended his career as a key reserve and starting his last two games following an injury to Malcolm Willis.

``There's a tremendous amount of pride in the community,'' McNamee said. ``Guys like Derek grow up dreaming of playing at Penn State. There are still a lot of kids who have that dream.''

The NCAA sanctions limit Penn State's recruiting classes to no more than 15 a year for the next four years, starting with the 2013 class to be signed in February. Most teams can sign 25.

Starting with the 2014 season, the Nittany Lions can only have 65 players on scholarship until after the 2017 season. The usual scholarship limit for major college teams is 85.

Walk-ons will need to fill the gap for Penn State.

One of McNamee's players, Drew Scales, said he's looking at Penn State in hopes of getting a scholarship offer, but that he could also see coming to Happy Valley as a walk-on with a shot to contribute early in his career. The speedy 5-foot-8 senior said he's being recruited as a slot receiver.

Seeing Penn State's offense transform into a successful passing attack under O'Brien changed Scales' view of Penn State.

``Honestly, I haven't been a huge Penn State fan, but when Bill O'Brien got there, it completely changed my view,'' he said. ``I like the way he opened up the offense.''

Guy Montecalvo, the athletic director at Canon-McMillan High School in western Pennsylvania, said walk-ons will be needed to bolster depth in order for the Nittany Lions to remain competitive. Montecalvo also coached current Nittany Lions linebacker Mike Hull, who figures to be a key player on defense next season.

Montecalvo, who also played at Penn State, said McGloin became a model for other prospective walk-ons.

``I certainly think he is a shining example of what can happen to a young man if he has the courage of convictions to pursue his dream,'' Montecalvo said.

McGloin did that and became a starter against long odds, beating out highly-recruited players during his career including Rob Bolden. He has since transferred to LSU. McGloin and Bolden split the job the previous two seasons under former coach Joe Paterno.

O'Brien named McGloin the starter after spring practice, and McGloin flourished with a full offseason knowing he was going to lead the offense redesigned by O'Brien.

Now, being known as a former walk-on isn't so bad.

``Walk-ons want their names recognized. Myself, I liked the challenge,'' he said. ``I like being the underdog, wanting to earn respect and recognition each and every day.''

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Follow Genaro Armas athttp://twitter.com/GArmasAP

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Was Columbus' travel a factor in the Caps' series comeback?

Was Columbus' travel a factor in the Caps' series comeback?

Whenever a playoff series ends, the analysis begins soon after. Why did this team win? Why did this team lose? Why did this player perform while this one did not?  This is an exercise performed by media, players and coaches alike, especially for teams that walk away from a series believing they let an opportunity slip away.

The Columbus Blue Jackets fell to the Washington Capitals in six games despite taking a 2-0 series lead by winning both opening games in Washington. Head coach John Tortorella will have all summer to think about what he could have done differently and what went wrong for his team, but it sounds like he already has at least one theory as to why they lost.

In a series that featured four overtime games, Game 4 stands out as being far more one-sided than the others. Washington turned in the most dominant performance of the series in a 4-1 win that knotted the teams at two wins apiece.

That game stood out to Tortorella too and he thinks he knows why the Blue jackets laid an egg that night: Travel.

"I think we should’ve stayed in Washington after that second overtime game, the second game there," Tortorella said. "I think that comes back and gets you later on in the series. We should’ve stayed in Washington and let them get a good night sleep. They got in here so late. I don’t think it affected us in Game 3. It comes the next days, so that falls on me."

When analyzing why the Caps won the series, chances are travel is not going to be a reason many people consider. Perhaps there is some merit to this. After all, as the father of an infant, I can certainly vouch for how much of a difference one good night of sleep can make.

But perhaps there is another message being sent here by Tortorella.

Tortorella is a master at using the media to his advantage. He uses the media to send messages to his team or draw attention on himself and away from the players.

Tortorella just saw his young team give up a 2-0 series lead and lose four straight games. Those are the kind of losses that can stick with a player and create doubt in the mind of a team the next time they reach a tough spot in the postseason.

So what did Tortorella do? He came out and put the worst loss of the series on his own shoulders. Why was it his fault? Uh...travel? Yeah, let's go with travel.

The Blue Jackets are not the first team to play overtime on the road or the first team to deal with travel concerns. To hear a coach say it was a reason they lost a game and not even the next game after the travel? Well, that's a first.

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Nats give up monster HR, drop series-opener with Giants

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Nats give up monster HR, drop series-opener with Giants

SAN FRANCISCO  -- Mac Williamson hit a two-run homer in the sixth to lead the Giants past the Washington Nationals 4-2 on Monday night.

Chris Stratton (2-1) struck out five over 6 2/3 innings, allowing two runs and four hits.

Williamson, playing his first home game at AT&T Park this season after being called up during the recent road trip, connected with a deep drive to right-center off Shawn Kelley after he relieved starter Gio Gonzalez (2-2). Gonzalez walked Brandon Belt to end his day before Williamson crushed the first pitch he saw from Kelley.

The 464-foot shot by Williamson is the furthest homer by the Giants this year, topping his previous 434-foot homer Friday after he was promoted to face the Angels in Anaheim. Earlier Monday, Williamson drove in his team's initial run on a fielder's choice in the fourth.

Only three home runs have travelled further in 2018, according to MLB StatCast: Franchy Cordero (489), Avisail Garcia (481) and Marcell Ozuna (479)

San Francisco kicked off a 10-game homestand by winning back-to-back games for only the second time this season and first since April 4-7. The Giants were coming off their first series victory of the season against the Angels.

The Nationals' runs came on a pair of sacrifice flies, by Howie Kendrick in the third and pinch-hitter Andrew Stevenson in the seventh.

Gonzalez allowed three runs and four hits, struck out four and walked three in five innings.

In his only other start against Washington, Stratton threw 6 2/3 scoreless innings with 10 strikeouts last Aug. 13.

Hunter Strickland, who brawled with Bryce Harper during Washington's last visit to AT&T Park in late May 2017, finished for his fourth save in six chances. Harper didn't bat in the ninth.

NATS TRADE COLE

Washington traded right-hander A.J. Cole to the New York Yankees for cash. The 26-year-old Cole was 1-1 with a 13.06 ERA in four games for the Nationals and was designated for assignment last week.

BAKER REUNION

Ex-Nationals manager Dusty Baker, who guided Washington to back-to-back NL East titles before his firing after last season, visited the ballpark to see his former club.

Did he plan the visit in advance?

"Maybe," Baker said, grinning.

Nats pitcher Stephen Strasburg hustled out to give Baker a big hug behind the batting cage.

"What's up Dusty, how you doing?" Strasburg said.

Baker also visited with third base coach Bob Henley, the loan holdover from his coaching staff.

Baker is now working in an advisory role to Giants CEO Larry Baer while getting to watch son, Darren, play his freshman college season at California in Berkeley.

"I am good," Baker said. "How bad can it be between Cal, San Francisco and Sacramento?"

TRAINER'S ROOM

Nationals: OF Adam Eaton, on the disabled list retroactive to April 9 with a bone bruise in his left ankle, won't be rushed back until he is completely pain-free. "When you see him in the lineup he'll be ready," manager Dave Martinez said. "He's coming along. When we get him back this time we don't want any issues." ... OF Brian Goodwin remains in Florida with pain in his bruised left wrist.

Giants: LHP Will Smith is eagerly anticipating his return from Tommy John surgery that cost him all of last season, and he could come off the DL as soon as Tuesday. He pitched twice for Class-A San Jose and three times so far for Triple-A Sacramento. He is scheduled to throw consecutive days for Sacramento on Wednesday and Thursday then another short outing Sunday. "We're close. We're getting there," Smith said, noting it will be "awesome. I'm ready to go." ... RHP closer Mark Melancon (flexor strain in pitching elbow) is scheduled to play catch during Thursday's off day. There is no timetable for his return, manager Bruce Bochy said. ... LF Hunter Pence (sprained right thumb) did some hitting and is scheduled for early batting practice Tuesday.

UP NEXT

Giants lefty Ty Blach (1-3, 4.10 ERA) will face the Nationals for the first time in his career when he pitches the middle game of the series opposite right-hander Tanner Roark (1-1, 3.24).