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No. 12 Florida State downs Miami, 33-20

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No. 12 Florida State downs Miami, 33-20

MIAMI (AP) EJ Manuel threw for 229 yards, Devonta Freeman ran for a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns and No. 12 Florida State overcame a shaky start to beat Miami 33-20 on Saturday night, the Seminoles' third straight win over their archrival.

Manuel completed 21 of 31 passes for Florida State (7-1, 4-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), which won despite 12 penalties and five fumbles, two of them lost. Dustin Hopkins kicked four field goals for the Seminoles, and James Wilder added a touchdown run.

Stephen Morris, playing a week after spraining his left ankle, started and threw for 223 yards and a late touchdown for Miami (4-4, 3-2), which has lost three straight but controls its Coastal Division destiny.

Mike James had a touchdown run for the Hurricanes, who lost freshman Duke Johnson in the second half with an undisclosed injury.

Miami finished with 29 yards rushing on 21 attempts.

Freeman's 3-yard run with 11:53 left helped seal the win for Florida State, which was outgained 71-67 in the first quarter - and outgained Miami by more than 200 yards the rest of the way. The Seminoles led by only three entering the fourth, then took control with a seven-play drive highlighted by Manuel finding Kelvin Benjamin for a 39-yard gain.

Four rushes later, Freeman scored and Florida State could finally exhale. Freeman scored again with 2:45 left, making it 33-13 and sending much of the crowd toward the exits. The win put the Seminoles a half-game ahead of Clemson in the ACC's Atlantic Division, which has four teams with one loss in league play.

The first half had a little of everything: Nine Florida State penalties, four Seminoles fumbles, two departures by the entire Miami roster for halftime before time actually expired, two coaches livid with officiating decisions made in the final 9 seconds alone, and one fan running onto the field during a play.

It all added up to Florida State 13, Miami 10 at the break.

By halftime, a slew of pregame activity seemed forgotten, such as Miami announcing just before kickoff that Morris - listed as doubtful on the final injury report - was starting at quarterback, and Miami Heat stars Dwyane Wade, LeBron James, Udonis Haslem and Mario Chalmers hanging out on the sideline.

All that got overshadowed quickly, as the three-touchdown-underdog Hurricanes ran out to a two-score lead.

Florida State tight end Nick O'Leary fumbled the ball away on the Seminoles' first play from scrimmage, losing control as he leapfrogged Brandon McGee and landed on the helmet of Miami linebacker Denzel Perryman, who knocked the ball away. Mike James ran in from 9 yards out four plays later, and Miami struck first.

After Florida State shanked a punt 17 yards on its next possession, Jake Wieclaw connected on a chip shot and the Hurricanes had a 10-0 edge.

The Seminoles clawed back, taking a 13-10 lead at the break despite two offensive pass-interference calls - there was a third in the second half - and even after losing top rusher Chris Thompson to a left knee injury. Wilder's 17-yard touchdown run tied the game at 10, and Hopkins hit a 46-yard field goal to end an eventful flurry in the final seconds of the half.

Originally, after a Florida State penalty, officials ruled the half over because the 10-second runoff would have erased the remaining time, so Miami left the field. But Seminoles coach Jimbo Fisher used his last timeout to nullify the runoff, giving Hopkins a chance to kick - which counted, even though replays showed Miami coach Al Golden clearly signaling timeout to a linesman, who apparently didn't notice. So the Hurricanes left again, unaware 3 seconds remained.

``We got it straightened out. It's amazing,'' Fisher told ABC in a televised halftime interview.

His team had the lead at the break despite nine penalties, including two on kickoff returns and an offensive interference call against Rodney Smith that nullified a 50-yard gain and left Fisher fuming.

``That interference on the offense on that big play right there, I don't know if I've ever seen one like that for a guy not extending his arms,'' Fisher said. ``But that's ball. We played a sloppy half.''

And of course, there was a wide left - almost obligatory in a Florida State-Miami game, though hardly as dramatic as miskicks that doomed the Seminoles so many times before in this series. Hopkins missed from 44 yards with 12:31 left in the third, as Miami got away with giving Florida State a short field after an unsuccessful onside kick opened the half.

Hopkins and Wieclaw traded field goals late in the third quarter, sending the game into the final 15 minutes with the Seminoles up 16-13.

It didn't stay close much longer.

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Capitals Extra Podcast: Trade deadline story time with Alan May

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Capitals Extra Podcast: Trade deadline story time with Alan May

Alan May knows a thing or two about the trade deadline.

Over the course of his NHL career, May was traded five total times, four at the trade deadline. He sits down with Rob Carlin on a special edition of the Capitals Extra Podcast to tell stories from his playing days about what it was like getting traded.

This one's a can't miss for hockey fans. You can listen to the episode here on the Capitals Extra page or with the player below.

Report: Former Terp Diamond Stone included in federal documents detailing NCAA violations

Report: Former Terp Diamond Stone included in federal documents detailing NCAA violations

A bombshell article published Friday morning by Pat Forde and Pete Thamel of Yahoo! Sports details potential NCAA violations involving more than 20 schools and 25 players.

Several of the biggest names and programs in college basketball were referenced in the Yahoo! report, including former Maryland Terrapin, Diamond Stone.

According to documents and bank records that are part of an FBI investigation, Stone received $14,303 while a freshman at Maryland, a clear violation of NCAA rules. 

Former NBA agent Andy Miller of ASM Sports was the primary handler dishing out incentives, which included cash advances, entertainment expenses and travel expenses for high school and college prospects.

Other players referenced in the documents include Dennis Smith who played at North Carolina State, Isaiah Whitehead from Seton Hall, DeMatha star Markelle Fultz who played at Washington and Edrice "Bam" Adebayo who went on to play at Kentucky. 

Player's and their families from Duke, Michigan State, USC, North Carolina, Texas and Alabama were also included.

Stone played for the Terps during the 2015-16 season before declaring for the 2016 NBA Draft. He was selected 40th overall by the New Orleans Pelicans and traded to the Los Angeles Clippers. 

RELATED: DIAMOND STONE ADMITS TO 'MISTAKES' DURING FRESHMAN YEAR AT MARYLAND

Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon postponed Friday morning's media availability, but he did release the following statement through the school.

"Late last night we were alerted of a report associating one of our former student-athletes with an agent. We are extremely disappointed, and we will fully cooperate with any investigation. I do not have a relationship with Andy Miller or anyone from his agency, and at no time have I ever had a conversation with Andy Miller or his agency regarding any Maryland basketball player. We remain steadfast in upholding a program of integrity that reflects the values of our University community."

Stone did end up signing with a different agency.

While this is still under investigation, large consequences for the NCAA can be expected.

The NCAA also released a statement following the news. 

These allegations, if true, point to systematic failures that must be fixed and fixed now if we want college sports in America. Simply put, people who engage in this kind of behavior have no place in college sports. They are an affront to all those who play by the rules. Following the Southern District of New York's indictments last year, the NCAA Board of Governors and I formed the independent Commission on College Basketball, chaired by Condoleezza Rice, to provide recommendations on how to clean up the sport. With these latest allegations, it's clear this work is more important now than ever. The Board and I are completely committed to making transformational changes to the game and ensuring all involved in college basketball do so with integrity. We also will continue to cooperate with the efforts of federal prosecutors to identify and punish the unscrupulous parties seeking to exploit the system through criminal acts.