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Ohio State legend charged in road rage shooting

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Ohio State legend charged in road rage shooting

From Comcast SportsNet

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Former Ohio State football star Jim Stillwagon is suspected of shooting at a pickup truck on a highway ramp and later striking the driver with a handgun, causing it to fire a bullet that grazed the man's head, after a road rage incident that spanned about 14 miles, police said Monday.

The college Hall of Famer, a middle guard who helped the Buckeyes to a national championship in 1968, was jailed on a felonious assault charge and had bond set at 350,000 in municipal court in Delaware, north of Columbus.

Court records didn't list an attorney for the 63-year-old Stillwagon. A phone message was left Monday at his home in suburban Columbus.

The Sunday afternoon altercation between the truck driver and Stillwagon, who was on a motorcycle, might have started when one driver cut off the other, police said.

They said Stillwagon fired shots at the pickup truck, which turned into a parking area near a car parts store, across the street from some homes. Stillwagon then confronted the 41-year-old truck driver and struck him with the handgun, said Bruce Pijanowski, the interim police chief in Delaware.

There was no indication Stillwagon knew the injured man, who was treated at a hospital and checked himself out Sunday night, he said.

"Considering the circumstances, he's extremely lucky," Pijanowski said. "He had probably just superficial injuries, and it could have been a lot worse."

Stillwagon had a permit and was legally carrying the gun, Pijanowski said.

The former Ohio State defender was a three-year starter for coach Woody Hayes from 1968 to 1970, when the Buckeyes had three Big Ten titles in addition to their national championship.

Stillwagon was an All-American as a junior and senior and won the Outland and Lombardi awards, given to the dominant interior lineman in the country. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers but instead went to the Canadian Football League, where he played for the Toronto Argonauts through the 1975 season.

A preliminary hearing in his assault case is scheduled for Oct. 10.

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Report: Former Terp Diamond Stone included in federal documents detailing NCAA violations

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USA Today Sports

Report: Former Terp Diamond Stone included in federal documents detailing NCAA violations

A bombshell article published Friday morning by Pat Forde and Pete Thamel of Yahoo! Sports details potential NCAA violations involving more than 20 schools and 25 players.

Several of the biggest names and programs in college basketball were referenced in the Yahoo! report, including former Maryland Terrapin, Diamond Stone.

According to documents and bank records that are part of an FBI investigation, Stone received $14,303 while a freshman at Maryland, a clear violation of NCAA rules. 

Former NBA agent Andy Miller of ASM Sports was the primary handler dishing out incentives, which included cash advances, entertainment expenses and travel expenses for high school and college prospects.

Other players referenced in the documents include Dennis Smith who played at North Carolina State, Isaiah Whitehead from Seton Hall, DeMatha star Markelle Fultz who played at Washington and Edrice "Bam" Adebayo who went on to play at Kentucky. 

Player's and their families from Duke, Michigan State, USC, North Carolina, Texas and Alabama were also included.

Stone played for the Terps during the 2015-16 season before declaring for the 2016 NBA Draft. He was selected 40th overall by the New Orleans Pelicans and traded to the Los Angeles Clippers. 

RELATED: DIAMOND STONE ADMITS TO 'MISTAKES' DURING FRESHMAN YEAR AT MARYLAND

Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon postponed Friday morning's media availability, but he did release the following statement through the school.

"Late last night we were alerted of a report associating one of our former student-athletes with an agent. We are extremely disappointed, and we will fully cooperate with any investigation. I do not have a relationship with Andy Miller or anyone from his agency, and at no time have I ever had a conversation with Andy Miller or his agency regarding any Maryland basketball player. We remain steadfast in upholding a program of integrity that reflects the values of our University community."

Stone did end up signing with a different agency.

While this is still under investigation, large consequences for the NCAA can be expected.

The NCAA also released a statement following the news. 

These allegations, if true, point to systematic failures that must be fixed and fixed now if we want college sports in America. Simply put, people who engage in this kind of behavior have no place in college sports. They are an affront to all those who play by the rules. Following the Southern District of New York's indictments last year, the NCAA Board of Governors and I formed the independent Commission on College Basketball, chaired by Condoleezza Rice, to provide recommendations on how to clean up the sport. With these latest allegations, it's clear this work is more important now than ever. The Board and I are completely committed to making transformational changes to the game and ensuring all involved in college basketball do so with integrity. We also will continue to cooperate with the efforts of federal prosecutors to identify and punish the unscrupulous parties seeking to exploit the system through criminal acts.