Penn St. officials arraigned on new charges

Penn St. officials arraigned on new charges

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) Two Penn State administrators were arraigned Friday on new accusations they hushed up child sexual abuse allegations against former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

The hearing for Gary Schultz and Tim Curley on charges of endangering the welfare of children, obstruction and conspiracy lasted about 10 minutes in a suburban Harrisburg courtroom. Bail was set at $50,000.

Afterward, Schultz attorney Tom Farrell talked of the positive things the men have accomplished, along with their co-defendant, former Penn State president Graham Spanier.

``People of this character do not do, have not done what they're charged with,'' Farrell said.

Curley and Schultz shook hands and greeted each other warmly inside the courtroom but said little during the proceeding, after which they drove away to be fingerprinted.

Spanier has been out of state at a relative's funeral and will be arraigned on Wednesday, the judge said.

The three men were accused in a withering 39-page grand jury report that was made public Thursday of conspiring to conceal complaints about Sandusky, which gave him time and access to molest more boys before his arrest nearly a year ago.

Prosecutors alleged the men decided not to alert police or child welfare authorities after getting a 2001 report of Sandusky sexually abusing a boy in a team shower.

Attorney General Linda Kelly said at a Capitol news conference Thursday that all three ``knowingly testified falsely and failed to provide important information and evidence.''

Spanier is charged with perjury, obstruction, endangering the welfare of children, failure to properly report suspected abuse and conspiracy. Curley and Schultz were first charged a year ago, with perjury and failure to report abuse. Trial on those counts is scheduled for January.

Spanier's lawyers asserted his innocence and described the new charges as an attempt by Gov. Tom Corbett to divert attention from the three-year Sandusky investigation that began under his watch as attorney general.

Corbett spokesman Kevin Harley called the defense statement the ``ranting of a man who has just been indicted for covering up for a convicted pedophile.''

Sandusky, who spent decades on the Penn State football staff and was defensive coordinator during two national championship seasons, was convicted in June of sexually abusing 10 boys over 15 years. He has maintained his innocence and is serving a 30- to 60-year prison sentence.

Curley, 58, is the athletic director on leave while he serves out the last year of his contract. Schultz, 63, has retired as vice president for business and finance.

In a pair of pretrial motions filed this week regarding their earlier charges, Curley and Schultz both focused on the role played by Cynthia Baldwin, the university's then-chief counsel who accompanied them to their grand jury appearances. They argued charges should be dismissed, or grand jury testimony suppressed, because they believed Baldwin was representing them.

Baldwin's grand jury testimony was a key piece of the evidence used to support the new charges.

``We were stunned, we were flabbergasted that she would testify against our clients,'' said Curley's lawyer, Caroline Roberto.

Farrell said Baldwin, a former state Supreme Court justice, ``has betrayed her clients, her profession and testified falsely.''

Baldwin's lawyer Charles De Monaco referred a reporter to a statement issued this summer in which he defended her, saying she ``at all times fulfilled her obligations to the university and its agents.''

Spanier, 64, of State College, had been university president for 16 years when he was forced out after Sandusky's November 2011 arrest. He remains a faculty member but was placed on paid leave Thursday.

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Wizards to give fans Phil Chenier emoji signs and 1978 title shirts for special weekend

Washington Wizards

Wizards to give fans Phil Chenier emoji signs and 1978 title shirts for special weekend

This weekend was already going to be special for Washington Wizards fans. Now they will get souvenirs to remember it.

As part of their celebration of Phil Chenier's legendary career and the 40th anniversary of their 1978 NBA championship, the Wizards are handing out emoji signs on Friday night and commemorative t-shirts on Sunday. All fans in attendance will receive a giveaway.


The emoji sign has Chenier's face on it and will be handed out for the March 23 game against the Nuggets. Chenier will have his jersey retired at halftime during the game. 

The emoji sign is presented by NBC Sports Washington. You're welcome, Authentic Fans.


The shirts will be given out on Sunday when the Wizards host the New York Knicks. 

Here's the front...

And the back...

Let's take a closer look at that back...

As a reporter who has received many giveaways over the years at pro sports stadiums, these are uniquely awesome. Should be a great weekend for Wizards fans. See you at the arena.


NBC Sports Washington is on Apple News. Favorite us!


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Orioles round out starting pitching rotation, finalize 4-year contract with Alex Cobb

USA Today Sports

Orioles round out starting pitching rotation, finalize 4-year contract with Alex Cobb

SARASOTA, Fla. -- Alex Cobb's comfort and familiarity with the AL East was the deciding factor in his decision to sign with the Baltimore Orioles.

"They used the AL East and the success I've had in it to their advantage," the 30-year-old right-hander said Wednesday after finalizing a $57 million, four-year contract. "They kept challenging me with it and I love the challenge of pitching in this division and they know that over the times we talked. They did a really good job of making me feel like this is where I need to be."

Cobb gets $14 million in each of the first three seasons and $15 million in 2021, and he would earn a $500,000 bonus in each year he pitches 180 innings. Baltimore will defer $6.5 million from this year's salary and $4.5 million in each of the next three seasons.

He gets $2 million of the deferred money on Nov. 30, 2022, and $1.8 million annually on Nov. 30 from 2023-32. If he doesn't pitch at least 130 innings in 2020, an additional $5.25 million of the final's year salary would get deferred, payable $1.75 million annually on Nov. 30 from 2033-35.


Cobb has a full no-trade this year, then can list 10 teams from 2019-21 that he cannot be dealt to without his consent.

He had spent his entire six-season big league career with Tampa Bay and was the last big-name starting pitcher available in a slow-moving free agent market. He joined Andrew Cashner and Chris Tillman, who were signed last month, in a revamped rotation that includes holdovers Dylan Bundy and Kevin Gausman.

Cobb was 12-10 with a 3.66 ERA in 29 starts last season. He pitched 179 1/3 innings in his first full year back after missing nearly two seasons because of Tommy John surgery.

He had turned down the Rays' $17.4 million qualifying offer in November, and Baltimore pursued him from the start of free agency.

"They didn't stop bothering me the whole offseason," Cobb said. "They were very persistent, and I think that you notice that confidence they have in you just by the way they speak to you and the questions you ask and not questioning anything that's gone on. Everyone's got flaws that they come with and potential things you could really harp on that might not be your strong suit, but they never went down that avenue. They always told me how much they like certain aspects of what I do on and off the field, and just kept repeating how well I fit in here."


Cobb is 48-35 with a 3.50 in six big league seasons. Baltimore will lose its third-highest draft pick, currently No. 51, and the Rays get an extra selection after the first round as compensation.

Jose Mesa Jr. was designated for assignment Wednesday to clear a roster spot.

Baltimore opens on March 29 at home against Minnesota, but Cobb won't be ready to pitch then. He has agreed to be optioned to a minor league affiliate to help build up innings.

"I'm going to be pushing it as quick as I can," Cobb said. "That's going to be up to them. They've invested in me for a four-year period and as much as we know how much every game matters even early in April, we're going to have to look out for the overall future of this whole thing and whole contract and whatever they determine to be the way to protect me and my feedback from the bullpens I'm going to be throwing here in the next few days will probably determine the timeline."