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Roenick says NHL 'hurting itself immensely'

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Roenick says NHL 'hurting itself immensely'

Love him or hate him, NBC analyst Jeremy Roenick always has an opinion and the Hall of Fame center shared a few of them Wednesday morning as a guest on SN 960 The Fan.

While promoting his soon-to-be released autobiography “J.R.: My Life as the Most Outspoken, Fearless, and Hard-Hitting Man in Hockey,” Roenick gave his take on the NHL lockout and what needs to be done to end it.

Among his observations:

On the impact of the lockout:

“I’m a fan, I’m a huge fan, and I’m getting gypped out of the best sport in the world just as much as anybody else. Forget my job and paycheck and all that stuff. That doesn’t matter. It’s the fact I love seeing hockey every night. Seeing the scores, seeing the superstars play. The game is so good right now and I really feel the National Hockey League is hurting itself immensely, so much more than they did in 2004.”

On revenue sharing:

“You wonder, why wasn’t this revenue shared and figured out a little better in 2004 so we don’t have to do this again in 2012? Two times in eight years is too much for the fans to have to overcome. And they’re fighting for about $3.3 billion in revenue. That’s the last thing the fans want to hear, that they’re fighting over money.”

On the lack of negotiating:

“Unfortunately, every day that goes by the more frustrating the fans get. I truly feel, especially if they lose the whole year, they’re going to lose a tremendous fan base in the National Hockey League. It’s really, really frustrating to me because I know how awesome the National Hockey League is and how big the strides that were made in the last eight years.”

On what he would do to end the lockout:

“First of all, I’d be in meetings a lot more than they are. What frustrates me a lot is they’ll talk for two or three days and then they’ll go on a seven- or eight-day hiatus and not speak. If this game was so important they would just lock themselves in a room and get this thing done, hammered out. I know it’s tiring and takes a lot of effort, but the game is worth it. But that frustrates me right there.”

On what it might take to get the season started:

“Both sides have agreed it should go to 50-50 [revenue sharing] at some point. If that’s the case then it shouldn’t take too long in order to get to a deal where it’s going to get to 50-50. It may be a little faster than the players want, but not as fast as the owners want. That seems to be the issue right now.

“The contracts that are in place right now, the owners and the GMs signed them. I’m a true believer you sign a contract, you live up to a contract I always did that. I never renegotiated. I played my contracts all the way through. The owners have to make sure the contracts they signed are honored and get to the 50-50 as fast as they can. I think that’s only fair. Then we should have a healthy, happy NHL and hopefully the revenue can get to $4 billion and the players don’t see [their salaries] change that much. But I’m really frustrated with the amount of talks and the lack of urgency to try to get this thing done. I think they should be in a room seven days a week if that have to to get this done.”
     

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The Caps' penalty kill has been a major factor in the series turnaround

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The Caps' penalty kill has been a major factor in the series turnaround

For the Capitals to beat the Columbus Blue Jackets, one of the keys to the series was going to be the penalty kill. 

For the season, Columbus ranked only 25th in the league on the power play at 17.2-percent, but that number did not reflect the massive improvement the Blue Jackets made with their trade deadline acquisitions.

Since the trade deadline on Feb. 26, Columbus ranked seventh on the power play. The Caps were sixth with both teams converting 25.0-percent of the time.

Where Washington did have an edge, seemingly, was on the penalty kill. Unlike the power play, Columbus' penalty kill was consistently poor all season, finishing 27th in the NHL with a kill rate of only 76.2-percent. While not a strength by any means, the Caps were certainly better on the PK with a kill rate of 80.3-percent, good for 15th in the league.

With two power plays converting at the same rate, Washington had to be able to kill off more of the Blue Jackets' opportunities. They struggled to do that in Game 1 and Game 2.

The Caps were called for four penalties and gave up two power play goals in each of the first two games. Washington scored five power play goals in those games, but their advantage on special teams was mitigated by their inability to keep Columbus from converting. 

There are many reasons why the Caps were able to overcome the 0-2 series deficit and now sit just one win away from advancing to the second round. Chief among those reasons is the improved penalty kill. Since Game 2, Washington has not allowed a single power play goal. The PK has successfully killed off 13 straight penalties including five in Game 5.

"I think as a group, they've all stepped up," Barry Trotz said on a conference call with the media on Sunday. "I don't think I can single out anybody. They've all stepped up. The penalty kill is as good as the five guys that you have, your four and your goaltender. They've been very committed there."

In a series that has seen four out of five games go to overtime, it's not hard to recognize the impact even one goal can have on a game and, by extension, the series. Should the Caps go on to win the series, their ability to adjust their penalty kill to stop the Blue Jackets' suddenly potent power play will be one of the main reasons why.

Trotz would not go into specifics as to the adjustments the team made after Game 2, but did acknowledge the penalty kill has been a "major factor" in the Caps' turnaround this series.

But to finish the job, the penalty kill will have to continue adjusting.

"This is the time when we're still trying to tweak things," Trotz said. "They changed some things on their power play a little bit yesterday, so we'll look to maybe tweak a little bit with our PK."

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How Nicklas Backstrom saved the Capitals 3 different times in Game 5

How Nicklas Backstrom saved the Capitals 3 different times in Game 5

The Capitals found themselves in deep trouble on Saturday.

Game 5 at Capital One Arena provided Washington a golden opportunity to take a 3-2 lead in their 2018 Stanley Cup Playoff first-round series against the Columbus Blue Jackets. A loss -- another home loss -- would have been a devastating blow.

After battling back from a 2-0 series deficit, to lose in Washington would mean facing elimination in Columbus. Game 5 was the game the Caps needed and it would have slipped away from them if not for Nicklas Backstrom.

The Caps’ most underrated superstar -- the one who is constantly overshadowed by the likes of Alex Ovechkin and Braden Holtby -- took center stage on Saturday as he tipped a Dmitry Orlov shot past Sergei Bobrovsky at 11:53 of overtime to seal the victory for Washington.

“It was just a good shot from [Orlov],” Backstrom said after the game. “I thought before he had a chance to block it, and I got a tip on it, and it’s usually what happens in the playoffs. Tip goals or rebound goals. That’s the way it is. It was nice.”

Backstrom’s overtime goal capped off a three-point night for the veteran center, who also scored in the first period and assisted on a goal from T.J. Oshie.

The team ended up needing every one of his points.

From the start, Columbus outplayed Washington. With the series tied 2-2, a best-of-three mentality took over and the Blue Jackets pushed hard for the pivotal Game 5 win.

It is in those very moments that team needs its superstar players to step up. In Game 3, it was Holtby who stole the show to help Washington steal a win in Columbus.

On Saturday, it was Backstrom.

Columbus converted a shorthanded goal to seize a 1-0 lead in what was shaping up to be a dominant first period. A fluke goal from Backstrom, however, made sure the score was knotted up, 1-1, after the opening frame.

With the puck behind the goal line, Backstrom tried to slip a pass through the crease. Bobrovsky got a piece of the puck with his stick, but the amount of spin on the pass forced the puck to carom off the stick, off the back of Bobrovsky himself, and into the net.

“I was trying to make a pass,” Backstrom said. “Honestly, got lucky. I don’t know who came back-door there but I was trying for him. I’ll take it.”

After a back and forth game, the Blue Jackets came out swinging to start the third. Down 3-2, Columbus tied the game just 2:30 in and made a real push to win the game in regulation. Washington was outshot 16-1 in the third and looked like they had no push at all.

But the Caps looked like a different team when they took the ice for the extra frame. What happened in between periods?

“As I was leaving the room after the period, I could hear guys, the right guys, all saying the right things,” head coach Barry Trotz said.

When later asked if one of those guys was Backstrom, Trotz said, “Absolutely. He's one of the leaders on our team. They were all talking about let's make sure we're doing the right things. There's a lot of pride, lot of good leadership in that room.”

Whatever Backstrom and the other leaders said did the trick. Washington made a strong push in overtime leading to Backstrom’s game-winning goal.

This isn’t the first time Backstrom has delivered. Saturday’s overtime tally is the fourth of his career. That’s the most in franchise history and tied for fifth in NHL history.

Through his efforts on the ice, the Caps were able to erase a bad first period and steal the win in overtime. But it also took a big effort off the ice to get the job done.

“If you just look at the scoresheet, that doesn't say enough of about Nick Backstrom, his contribution from in the dressing room to on the ice to key moments to key faceoffs,” Trotz said.

“I've been on his soapbox about how complete a player he is and I never really worry about Nick Backstrom. He's got enough games under his belt, he's got enough stats to back it up and he's played huge minutes and he's one of our leaders. He's a tremendous hockey player.”