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How the MLB celebrated Jackie Robinson Day, from Washington to Los Angeles

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USA TODAY Sports

How the MLB celebrated Jackie Robinson Day, from Washington to Los Angeles

By Michaela Johnson

Every year since 2004, the MLB has celebrated Jackie Robinson Day to commemorate Robinson’s significant and historic effects on the game of baseball.

On opening day 1947, Jackie Robinson became the first African American Major League Baseball player, breaking the race barrier between the MLB and the Negro leagues of the time.

To honor Robinson, players and team personnel wear the number 42, a jersey number that has been retired from the league since 1997. Robinson was the first athlete in any sport to have his number universally retired.

In addition to playing in No. 42 jerseys, individual clubs and players have their own ways of celebrating Jackie Robinson.

The Nationals took part by holding their annual Black Heritage Day on the same day as Jackie Robinson Day. Nats skipper Dusty Baker, one of two Black managers in the MLB, talked about the significance of this day in a post-game press conference. “Every day is Jackie Robinson Day to me,” Baker said. “If  it weren’t for him I wouldn’t be in baseball and I wouldn’t be working as a player and I wouldn’t have a job.”

Outfielder Bryce Harper shared this photo of his custom cleats.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BS6EZyWh_3a/?taken-by=bharper3407&hl=en

Orioles outfielder Adam Jones explained what Jackie Robinson Day means to him in an interview with ESPN. “It's a celebration of a man that was ahead of his time and at the forefront for what he believed in,” Jones said. “I always try to ... understand what he's been through and try and treat baseball as the treat it really is.”

Jones also wore custom cleats for the day.

Thanks to @nikebaseball for these amazing shoes on Jackie Robinson Day.

A post shared by 10 (@simplyaj10) on

The Dodgers, with whom Robinson spent all ten years of his major league career, unveiled a bronze statue of his signature slide into home plate. The club has moved from Brooklyn to Los Angeles since Robinson's time, but his legacy within the organization lives on just as strong. Robinson’s wife, daughter and a number of extended family members attended the ceremony. The statue at Dodger Stadium is the eighth statue of Robinson in the country, reportedly the most of any American athlete.

Former MLB commissioner Bud Selig officially stated the Jackie Robinson Day would occur annually on April 15 in 2005. The league-wide donning of No. 42 jerseys began in 2009 and has been a tradition ever since.

Here are some other examples of clubs and players honoring Robinson around the league:

Mariners second baseman Robinson Cano: "Jackie is my hero."

The San Francisco Giants used Jackie Robinson Day to look forward to their own African American Heritage night. 

Indians manager Terry Francona put it best, saying, "In my opinion, this is the most important day we salute, or we honor, of any day of the year." 

More MLB: 10 INSANE BALLPARK FOODS YOU'LL SEE IN 2017

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Bryce Harper thanks Nationals fans for support during 2017 season

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Bryce Harper thanks Nationals fans for support during 2017 season

It's been a week since the air was sucked out of D.C. in the Nationals Game 5, 9-8 loss to the Chicago Cubs. 

And now that we've had a few days to decompress from another early D.C. playoff exit, Nats right fielder Bryce Harper decided to take some time to thank fans for their support this season.

Harper posted an Instagram video Wednesday afternoon, with a fresh cut, and thanked fans for continuing to pack Nats Park. In the video he says he looks forward to "chasing that championship" again next spring. 

The 2017 season could be described as a rough one for Harper after missing the last few weeks of the season with a bone bruise in his left knee. 

Harper had a .319 average during the 2017 season, along with 29 home runs, 97 RBI's, 95 runs scored and 4 stolen bases. He is entering the final year of his contract.

RELATED: 20 THINGS SAD D.C. SPORTS FANS SHOULD BE HAPPY ABOUT

National Fans. Thank you!💯 #RedLightRecording

A post shared by Bryce Harper (@bharper3407) on

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Nationals Game 5 meltdown yet another reminder why D.C. can't have nice things

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Nationals Game 5 meltdown yet another reminder why D.C. can't have nice things

On Thursday night, a Washington, D.C. pro sports team did something Washington, D.C. pro sports teams are very good at doing: fall short of making a league or championship game.

The Nationals' disastrous fifth inning against the Cubs in Game 5 of the National League Divisional Series was the beginning of the end, not to mention yet another in a long line of disappointing playoff results for Washington, D.C. sports teams.

You see, Washington, D.C. is the only city with at least three major pro sports teams to not have a single one make a conference or league championship game since 2000.

To make matters worse, Washington, D.C. sports teams have now lost 16 consecutive playoff games in which a win would've advanced the team to the conference or league championship. 

Think about that for a second. Four teams. Zero conference championship appearances since 1998. 

Here's the list.

Washington, D.C. sports fans are not greedy. We can't be. We've had some very good teams recently, with the type of talent, coaching and intangibles needed to win a championship. 

TRY THIS: 20 THINGS DC SPORTS FANS SHOULD BE HAPPY ABOUT. YES, HAPPY.

The last time a major Washington, D.C. pro sports team won a world championship was in 1992 when the Redskins won Super Bowl XXVI.  The last time a major Washington, D.C. pro sports team even made a conference championship game was in 1998, when the Capitals advanced to the Eastern Conference Final, defeating the Sabres to advance to the Stanley Cup Final.

Washington, D.C. isn't allowed to have nice sports things.

Sure, we have great players and great teams, but when the playoffs roll around, all the nice things go away. We aren't privy to plucky upstarts who run the table and we aren't privy to dominant teams that make long postseason runs.

Washington, D.C. will have its day, eventually. Sure it may only be a conference championship appearance, but for us, that's fine. We don't expect world championships. We just want something to get invested in.

Early playoff exits are rarely worth the investment.