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More roster decisions looming for Nats

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More roster decisions looming for Nats

Yesterday's Drew Storen-for-Rick Ankiel swap left the Nationals with an unconventional roster: an eight-man bullpen and a four-man bench. And Mike Rizzo made it clear that odd alignment was created to keep as many relievers as possible in the mix for this weekend's four-gamethree-day showdown with the Braves.

But Rizzo also made it clear this arrangement won't last long. The Nationals don't need eight relievers long-term, and they do need a fifth player off the bench. So we should be expecting more roster moves from Rizzo in the near future as the club tries to put together various pieces of a complicated, 25-man puzzle.

"We're going to go with it until we have to make another roster move that's dictated by the health of somebody coming back," the GM said yesterday.

In that regard, there are two names of rehabbing players to keep in mind: Jayson Werth and Chad Tracy. Each is close to coming off the disabled list and rejoining the Nationals' active roster.

Werth's return is still a couple of weeks away; he's due to begin a rehab assignment with Class A Potomac tonight, his first game action since he broke his left wrist trying to make a diving catch on May 6.

"We're going to be cautious with him, because we're going to need him in the stretch drive," Rizzo said. "We're going to make sure he's healthy. We're going to give him ample plate appearances so he can see ample pitches and when he comes up here he can hit the ground running."

Tracy, out since late May with a sports hernia that required surgery, is closer to rejoining the active roster. The veteran corner infielder and pinch-hitter extraordinaire had to abort his first rehab assignment with Class A Potomac earlier this month but has been taking batting and fielding practice at Nationals Park the last few days and appears just about ready to return to one of the organization's affiliates to see more game action.

"His injury is a little trickier," Rizzo said. "Those sports hernias are ... it's not so much about swinging the bat. It's about exploding out of the box after you hit the ball. It's lateral movement and that type of thing. He's a veteran player that's had that injury before. He'll dictate when he's ready to go out for rehab."

Whether it's a week, two weeks or three weeks before Tracy andor Werth return, the Nationals will at some point have to clear roster space for each veteran. One will take the spot currently held by the extra reliever. The other will bump someone else off the Nats' bench, leading to a dilemma.

Who draws the short straw from the current group of reserves? Backup catcher Sandy Leon is safe, at least until Jhonatan Solano recovers from an oblique strain. Utilityman Steve Lombardozzi will remain because of his production and versatility. That leaves outfielder Roger Bernadina, left fielderfirst baseman Tyler Moore and utilityman Mark DeRosa, with room on the roster for only two.

DeRosa has easily been the least productive of the group, though he's well-respected as a clubhouse leader, and manager Davey Johnson has touted him all along as a key to this team's success. Bernadina is out of minor-league options and has played well over the last two weeks. Moore has also hit well as a rookie, though he does have options.

The bench decision may pale in comparison to the decision Rizzo and Johnson are going to have to make with their bullpen in a few days. Quite simply, there's no obvious candidate to lose his job at the moment.

The least effective reliever on the roster is Henry Rodriguez, but he has no options and club officials remain committed to the erratic right-hander over the long haul. Michael Gonzalez is a relatively recent addition to the group, but the veteran lefty has pitched well and likewise is out of options.

That leaves one of two right-handers with impeccable stats so far this season: Ryan Mattheus and Craig Stammen. Each boasted sub-2.00 ERAs (until Stammen served up a three-run homer to David Wright yesterday) and each has filled an important need: Mattheus as a setup man, Stammen as a right-handed long reliever.

"You've got a bullpen which is performing extremely well," Rizzo said. "The bullpen guys with options are too valuable to send out, and anybody you designate and send out is going to be taken by somebody else. So guys like Mike Gonzalez and Henry Rodriguez, they're too valuable for us in 2012, and Henry beyond 2012. We couldnt take the chance of them getting claimed by another club."

Ultimately, Rizzo will have no choice but to part ways with two players from his current roster. That parting, though, doesn't have to be permanent. Should he choose to send down those players who still have minor-league options, Rizzo could ensure all remain in the organization. And all could be brought back on Sept. 1 once rosters expand to 40.

These won't be easy decisions. But Rizzo has to decide what makes the most sense for his club. Now, in September and beyond.

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Why Bryce Harper would be a bargain at $500 million

Why Bryce Harper would be a bargain at $500 million

$500 million.

That number is so hard to wrap your brain around, but it's a number a lot of professional baseball players may soon start seeing on their contracts.

One player who could be the first to see that amount within the next year is Nationals right fielder Bryce Harper.

Harper will become a free agent in 2018 and people are already projecting his market value at close to $500 million, if not more.

Miami Marlins right fielder Giancarlo Stanton signed a contract back in 2014 for 13 years, $325 million, holding the league record.

For Fancy Stats writer Neil Greenberg, $500 million is a bargain for someone of Harper's caliber.

"Harper is every bit as good [as Stanton] but he's also young," Greenberg told the Sports Junkies Friday.

"I mean, we don't see a player that's as good as Harper, that's as young a Harper, hit the market almost ever I want to say. You look at how many years of his prime he has left and then even if you start to give him just the typical aging curb off of that prime, he's probably worth close to 570 million dollars starting from 2019 and going forward ten years. And that includes also the price of free agency going up and other factors."

Harper, who is only 25 years-old, brings more to a team than just talent. He's one of the most recognizable figures in baseball, bringing tremendous marketing opportunities to an organization. Greenberg dove deeper into how that will increase his market value.

"And that's just for the on-the-field product. You talk about all the marketing that's done around Bryce Harper [and] what he does for the game. In my opinion, and based on the numbers that I saw, he's a bargain at $500 million."

Don't we all wish someone would say $500 million is a bargain for us?

After crunching the numbers, the biggest takeaway for Greenberg is the return on investment the Nationals have gotten out of Harper.

"Like if you look at his wins above replacement throughout his career, he's given you 200 million dollars in value for 21 million dollars in cash and he's due what another 26 or 27 million this year. I mean he's already given you an amazing return on investment."

"So, if you're the Nationals having - benefited from that - you know you have a little bit of, I guess, wiggle room in terms of maybe you're paying a little bit for past performance 'cause, you know, when a player is on arbitration in their early years they don't really get paid that much."

The Nationals still have Harper for one more season and many feel they need to make him an offer sooner than later. Whenever and whoever he gets an offer from, it's going to be a nice pay day for him.

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Nats' Max Scherzer wins second straight NL Cy Young Award

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Nats' Max Scherzer wins second straight NL Cy Young Award

Max Scherzer of the Washington Nationals has coasted to his third Cy Young Award and second straight in the National League.

Scherzer breezed past Los Angeles Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw, drawing 27 of the 30 first-place votes in balloting by members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

The honor was announced Wednesday on MLB Network.

Scherzer earned the NL honor last year with Washington and the 2013 American League prize with Detroit. He became the 10th pitcher with at least three Cy Youngs.

RELATED: WIETERS WILL RETURN TO NATS IN 2018 

Scherzer was 16-6 with a 2.51 ERA and a league-leading 268 strikeouts for the NL East champion Nationals.

Kershaw has already won three NL Cy Youngs, and was the last pitcher to win back-to-back. He was 18-4 with a league-best 2.31 ERA and 202 strikeouts.

Corey Kluber of the Cleveland Indians easily won his second AL Cy Young Award earlier in the day. He got 28 of the 30 first-place votes, with Boston's Chris Sale second and Luis Severino of the New York Yankees third.

Kluber led the majors with a 2.25 ERA and his 18 wins tied for the most in baseball.