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Nats beaten, but still have a chance to clinch

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Nats beaten, but still have a chance to clinch

ST. LOUIS -- They picked just about the worst possible moment to play their worst ballgame of the season, a 2-hour, 51-minute stinker that ended in a 12-2 thumping at the hands of an opponent who looked far more ready for the postseason than they did.

So why weren't the Nationals completely down in the dumps at the end of a miserable night at Busch Stadium?

"That was a beating, there," first baseman Adam LaRoche said. "But we're obviously watching the scoreboard, and the Braves finally lost a game this month. So I guess we can take that as a positive."

Yes, the best thing that happened to the Nationals Friday night took place 554 miles to the southeast in Atlanta, where the Braves blew a late lead to the Mets and lost 3-1 on Chipper Jones Night, failing to gain any ground in the NL East.

So, guess what, folks: The Nationals, with their magic number down to 2, have a chance to clinch their first-ever division title Saturday night.

That kind of takes the sting out of the most-lopsided loss of the season, doesn't it?

"Oh, yeah. Yeah," LaRoche said. "You know it's getting down to the wire. We know that. We obviously like our chances, but nothing's done until it's sealed up. So you're getting beat by 10 runs, you try to look at the positives in it. Forget about this one."

That was the overarching theme throughout the Nationals clubhouse, players and coaches trying to throw this monstrosity out the window and immediately shift their attention to the greater task at hand.

"I don't even want to talk about it," manager Davey Johnson said with a smile.

It may be relatively easy for the Nationals as a whole to brush this one off. It may not be quite as easy for the man most responsible for allowing it to happen: Edwin Jackson.

The veteran right-hander suffered through his worst start of the year, getting torched for nine runs (eight earned) in only 1 13 innings and putting his team in a 9-1 hole before many in the crowd of 39,166 had a chance to settle into their seats.

"Very disappointing and embarrassing," Jackson said. "When your club is in a pennant race and you have a game like that, it definitely leaves a bitter taste in your mouth that you did absolutely nothing to give your team a chance to win."

Jackson didn't mince words when described an utterly forgettable start. He faced 15 batters and managed to retire only three of them. One was a double-play grounder hit by the opposing pitcher. The other two still drove in runs with productive outs.

The Nationals felt this was an anomaly, a one-time blip that carries no significance in the bigger picture. But there are some red flags for Jackson that pre-date this game.

This was the 29-year-old's fifth appearance this month. Only one qualified as a quality start: last Saturday's eight-inning masterpiece against the Brewers. His ERA for the month: 7.92. His updated ERA for the season: 4.13.

Do the Nationals need to reconsider how Jackson (who seemed to be penciled in all along as their No. 3 starter for the postseason) figures into their October plans? Johnson insisted the answer is no.

"I just throw it out," the manager said of this start. "If he usually has trouble, it's early, and he couldn't right the ship. The Cardinals are in kinda playoff mode. They're going to jump all over him. Getting behind, walking people, just gets them more fired up."

Jackson, who owns a World Series ring as a member of St. Louis' 2011 championship rotation, has bounced back from enough bad starts in his career to start worrying now. This was the fifth time he failed to complete two innings, though the first time since 2007.

"Short-term memory, man," he said. "It's not the first game. Just shake it off. I'm not dead from this game. It just definitely leaves a bitter taste in my mouth. But I'm not going to go jump off a bridge or anything because of the game."

Nor should anyone in the Nationals clubhouse harbor such morose feelings right now.

They may have just suffered their worst beating of the season. But thanks to a surprising development in Atlanta, they'll show up at Busch Stadium on Saturday with an opportunity to do something no Washington baseball club has done in 79 years: Celebrate the clinching of a title.

"It wasn't happening tonight. Tomorrow's another day," Johnson said. "We got a little help from our friends. That was nice."

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Max Scherzer Giving Away Memorabilia For Good Cause

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Max Scherzer Giving Away Memorabilia For Good Cause

By Ryan Wormeli

Max Scherzer is the ace of the Nationals staff, a fan favorite, and the 2017 National League Cy Young award winner. He's also a soon-to-be father whose wife, Erica May-Scherzer, once accidentally threw out the jersey he wore when throwing his 2nd career no-hitter. This time around, I'm guessing they talked it over first before deciding to sell some of his memorabilia garage-style for a new fundraiser.

We don't have any more information about the fundraiser yet, but May-Scherzer posted some photos on Twitter this afternoon. 

And in case you're wondering, no, the Scherzer family cat featured in one of the pictures isn't for sale (we assume). Plus, even if they were willing to part with their cat, considering Scherzer is on a contract worth over $200 Million, their price would probably be pretty steep. How much would you pay to adopt the cat of a 3-time Cy Young winner?

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Why Bryce Harper would be a bargain at $500 million

Why Bryce Harper would be a bargain at $500 million

$500 million.

That number is so hard to wrap your brain around, but it's a number a lot of professional baseball players may soon start seeing on their contracts.

One player who could be the first to see that amount within the next year is Nationals right fielder Bryce Harper.

Harper will become a free agent in 2018 and people are already projecting his market value at close to $500 million, if not more.

Miami Marlins right fielder Giancarlo Stanton signed a contract back in 2014 for 13 years, $325 million, holding the league record.

For Fancy Stats writer Neil Greenberg, $500 million is a bargain for someone of Harper's caliber.

"Harper is every bit as good [as Stanton] but he's also young," Greenberg told the Sports Junkies Friday.

"I mean, we don't see a player that's as good as Harper, that's as young a Harper, hit the market almost ever I want to say. You look at how many years of his prime he has left and then even if you start to give him just the typical aging curb off of that prime, he's probably worth close to 570 million dollars starting from 2019 and going forward ten years. And that includes also the price of free agency going up and other factors."

Harper, who is only 25 years-old, brings more to a team than just talent. He's one of the most recognizable figures in baseball, bringing tremendous marketing opportunities to an organization. Greenberg dove deeper into how that will increase his market value.

"And that's just for the on-the-field product. You talk about all the marketing that's done around Bryce Harper [and] what he does for the game. In my opinion, and based on the numbers that I saw, he's a bargain at $500 million."

Don't we all wish someone would say $500 million is a bargain for us?

After crunching the numbers, the biggest takeaway for Greenberg is the return on investment the Nationals have gotten out of Harper.

"Like if you look at his wins above replacement throughout his career, he's given you 200 million dollars in value for 21 million dollars in cash and he's due what another 26 or 27 million this year. I mean he's already given you an amazing return on investment."

"So, if you're the Nationals having - benefited from that - you know you have a little bit of, I guess, wiggle room in terms of maybe you're paying a little bit for past performance 'cause, you know, when a player is on arbitration in their early years they don't really get paid that much."

The Nationals still have Harper for one more season and many feel they need to make him an offer sooner than later. Whenever and whoever he gets an offer from, it's going to be a nice pay day for him.