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Nats ready to host postseason game at last

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Nats ready to host postseason game at last

Though there was legitimate optimism surrounding the Nationals when this season began, it took some time before the city fully bought into the notion this team could win big in 2012.

Indeed, six of the Nationals' first 13 home games this season drew crowds under 20,000 to South Capitol Street.

Slowly but surely, though, the town bought into this team. And by the time the Nationals were wrapping up the regular season -- and their first-ever NL East title -- a ballpark that had never been known as a particularly rowdy venue had turned into something not seen around these parts in a long time.

"It doesn't go unnoticed," first baseman Adam LaRoche said. "You could tell early on, it was almost more of a social gathering: Come out, nothing else to do, we'll just go hang out at the park. And now it's turned into some die-hard fans, some people probably skipping work and skipping school to come see the Nats. Our last few regular season home games, I think we're about as close to playoff atmosphere as you could get."

Nothing, of course, can completely duplicate a playoff atmosphere, which makes Wednesday's first-in-79-years event particularly exciting for so many.

After opening their National League Division Series with a two-game split in St. Louis, the Nationals now get to host a playoff game in their hometown, in their home park, in front of their home fans.

Considering how few people among the sellout crowd for Game 3 on Wednesday afternoon would have even had the opportunity to attend the last postseason ballgame in the District (Game 5 of the 1933 World Series), this is going to be no small-time event.

"We're excited, not only for ourselves and for all the hard work we've put in this year," shortstop Ian Desmond said. "But to bring a playoff game to D.C., it's something that's been a long time coming. They've been through a lot, a lot of tough years. It's an exciting time in the Beltway."

The setting won't be ideal -- Major League Baseball scheduled this game for 1:07 p.m. on a Wednesday, forcing fans to either skip work or school or pawn off their tickets on others who are available -- but that won't dampen the spirit as Washington puts itself on a true national baseball stage for the first time.

Official postseason logos have been painted along the baselines. Fans will be given red rally towels when they enter the park. Players and coaches will be introduced before the national anthem.

And an old friend will step to the mound to throw out the ceremonial first pitch: Frank Robinson.

The first manager in Nationals history -- not to mention one of the greatest players in baseball history -- has made a couple of appearances here since he was fired at the end of the 2006 season, but never in a public capacity. After a contentious breakup with former general manager Jim Bowden and former team president Stan Kasten, Robinson accepted the invitation from ownership to attend Wednesday's game.

The response, from fans and players alike, should be among the day's highlights.

"Oh, absolutely, hands down," said shortstop Ian Desmond, who changed his jersey number from 6 to 20 this season in honor of Robinson. "When he signed up here, he had this in mind. He wanted to start something, and he did. He's got his stamp on this organization forever. I'm forever indebted to him, and I think D.C. will be also."

There is, of course, a more significant task at hand for the Nationals than welcoming back a baseball legend. There is a slightly important ballgame to be played, one that could prove the turning point in this series.

Plenty of teams have stared elimination in the face and won back-to-back postseason games at home. Just look at the Cardinals, who pulled off that feat in last year's World Series.

But there's a distinct advantage to holding a 2-1 lead in a best-of-five series versus facing a 2-1 deficit.

"We know what it's going to take," LaRoche said. "I think we're going to try to keep it to one game at a time and try not to look too far ahead. We've got a big one tomorrow. If we don't get it done, we're in a bad spot. But we know how important that is. It would be nice to get that one and move on."

And, for so many who have anticipated this event for so long, it will be nice to experience postseason baseball in the District of Columbia.

"We've been a good home team, and we've put ourselves in a very good position to come home and just win a series," said Ryan Zimmerman, the only man to appear in at least one game during each of the Nationals' eight seasons. "If we can do that like we've done a lot of times this year, then we'll be sitting pretty.

"We're all excited to go out there tomorrow in front of our fans, in front of a full stadium of Nationals fans -- finally -- and see what it's like."

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With Ross placed on 60-day DL, Nationals agree to 1-year deal with veteran reliever

With Ross placed on 60-day DL, Nationals agree to 1-year deal with veteran reliever

WASHINGTON  -- The Washington Nationals say they have agreed to a one-year deal with 40-year-old reliever Joaquin Benoit.

The team announced the move Wednesday, along with placing pitcher Joe Ross on the 60-day disabled list as he recovers from Tommy John surgery in July.

The Nationals didn't release terms of the agreement, though a person with knowledge of the deal told The Associated Press on Monday that it was for $1 million.

The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the deal wasn't official at the time.

MORE NATIONALS: FULL 2018 SPRING TRAINING SCHEDULE

Benoit is a right-hander who first reached the big leagues in 2001. 

He has played for eight teams, finishing last year with Pittsburgh.

He has 764 career appearances, going 58-49 with a 3.83 ERA and 53 saves.

RELATED: 2018 MLB BETTING ODDS

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It's Day 1 of spring training and Bryce Harper is already done taking questions regarding his future

It's Day 1 of spring training and Bryce Harper is already done taking questions regarding his future

So if you have not heard, Bryce Harper is going to be an unrestricted free agent at the end of the 2018 season.

All off-season talking heads, baseball aficionados, radio hosts, etc. were speculating on where the outfielder’s destination will be next year.

And we are still a year away from it actually happening.

RELATED: VEGAS SETS OVER/UNDERS FOR 2018 MLB SEASON

Reporting to spring training on Monday, Harper did not waste any time telling the media how his press conferences were going to play out this season.

“If guys do [ask], or talk anything about that, I will be walking right out the door.”

Entering his seventh season with the Washington Nationals, the 25-year-old is coming off the second-best season, statistically, of his career. The 2015 NL MVP has hit .285 in his career, with 150 home runs and 421 RBIs. Unquestionably he is the face of the Nationals’ organization, if not, the best player in the team’s history.

If he does end the season without a contract extension, he will join Rafael Palmeiro, Alex Rodriguez, Randy Johnson, and Barry Bonds as the top sought out free agents in MLB history.

One thing is for certain in terms of Harper’s free agency; Harper has given no inclination on where his landing spot will be.  The top three cities are of course his favorite childhood team, the New York Yankees; joining with one of his closest friends with the Chicago Cubs; or just staying with Washington.

Wherever he does land, it does appear that it will be the largest contract given to a free agent ever.

As for now we just wait and direct any of your calls to his agent Scott Boras.

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