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Ready for more interleague play?


Ready for more interleague play?

The Nationals probably won't face a more daunting stretch of games this season than what they're experiencing right now: 32 consecutive games against the NL East and AL East, with every team in each division cracking the .500 mark at some point during this period.

We've passed the midway point of that stretch now; yesterday's series finale against the Mets was Game No. 17 of 32 (Note: It would have been 33 consecutive games if not for a rainout against the Braves.)

So how have the Nationals fared against these tough opponents? With yesterday's loss, they're now 9-8. Not bad, though certainly as good as this first-place club would prefer.

The first three games of this gantlet came at home against the Orioles. Everything since has come against the NL East. Now, though, interleague play resumes again across baseball, which means the Nationals are about to play five straight series against American League opponents.

The home stretch begins tonight in Boston, where the Nats make their first appearance at Fenway Park since 2006. It continues next week in Toronto before the Nationals come home to face the Yankees and Rays, then head just up the road for a final series in Baltimore.

The 2012 Red Sox aren't nearly as imposing an opponent as they've been for much of the last decade, but they're no picnic, either. And nobody doesn't get a least a tad fazed the first time they set foot inside Fenway.

So it'll be interesting to see how the Nationals respond to this weekend's high-profile series, especially Stephen Strasburg (who starts tonight) and Bryce Harper (who should be in the lineup unless he's severely downplaying the state of his lower back).

This, of course, is the last time we'll see interleague play conducted in this manner. Beginning next season -- after the Astros switch to the AL, giving each league 15 teams for the first time -- there will be at least one interleague game every day of the season.

How exactly this will work, and whether it involves adding more interleague games or not remains to be seen. But it will be different.

So as the Nationals brush up on their New England accents in preparation for this weekend's series at Fenway Paaahhhhk, here's a morning topic of discussion: Do you like interleague play? And what (if anything) would you do to change it?

My personal opinion: I've never been a huge fan of it. I'd prefer to see teams play more games against opponents from the other divisions within their own leagues. But since that's not about to change at this point, I at least hope the new-look format in 2013 ensures that every team in a particular division plays the exact same interleague schedule. Have all the NL East teams play all the AL East teams, one series apiece. No extra games against made-up, geographic rivals.

That's my two cents. What do you think?

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Did Max Scherzer's dance moves cause the Junkies' broadcast to lose power?

USA Today Sports

Did Max Scherzer's dance moves cause the Junkies' broadcast to lose power?

Watching Max Scherzrer rack up Ks during a game is a usual sight for fans.

Dancing is not.

On Wednesday while the Sports Junkies were broadcasting at Nats Spring Training in West Palm Beach, we got a taste of what the back-to-back Cy Young Award winner has to offer on the dance floor. 

With just about a week left until their season kicks off, manager Dave Martinez hired a DJ for the day's workout, saying he wanted to "turn it up a notch." 

Well he turned it up a few too many notches, causing the back end of the complex where the Junkies were broadcasting to lose power.

While the Junkies were put in a pickle because of said DJ, we were able to get a glance of Scherzer dancing to Drakes' "God's Plan."


It's nice to see the usually lazer-focused pitcher let loose.

While Scherzer's dance moves didn't actually cause the Junkies to lose power, it's nice to think they were too much for the ballpark to handle. 

106.7 The Fans Sports Junkies simulcasts on NBC Sports Washington every weekday morning from 6:00 to 10:00 am ET. You can stream the Sports Junkies right here

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The sound of Bryce Harper's first spring training HR is beautiful


The sound of Bryce Harper's first spring training HR is beautiful

It's that wonderful time of year again — when baseball teams flock to warmer climates for spring training and the regular season is practically around the corner — and Bryce Harper is already killing it.

It took the Washington Nationals a few games to brush away their offseason cobwebs and get back into gear, but since the beginning of March, they're riding a five-game win streak as of Sunday the 4th.

They are 6-4-1 in spring training going into Monday's matchup against the St. Louis Cardinals.

Since Thursday, the Nats have taken down — in order — the Atlanta Braves, New York Mets, defending World Series champion Houston Astros, the Detroit Tigers and the Mets again. Sunday's 6-2 win against the Tigers was in large part thanks to Harper's bat, as the star of the team drilled his first home run of spring training. 


Turn up the volume for this one because the sound of Harper's contact with the ball is just beautiful — and perhaps enough to get you pumped for the March 29 opener.

Harper blew this ball away in the bottom of the third for a two-run homer with Howie Kendrick on base. He also had a single in the fourth and finished the game with three RBI.

Gio Gonzalez was the winning pitcher for the Nats.