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Flashback Friday: Redskins vs. Jets Timeline


Flashback Friday: Redskins vs. Jets Timeline

A look back at the regular season history between this Saturday's opponents.

All Time: The Redskins lead the series 8-1

The First Time: Redskins 35, Jets 17, Shea Stadium, 11/5/72. The game completed a New York-New York sweep as the Redskins had beaten the Giants in Yankee Stadium the previous week (see details below).

The Last Time: Redskins 23, Jets 20, Giants Stadium 12/4/07. Shaun Suisham booted a 46-yard field goal in overtime to boost the Redskins over the Jets. Washington was in a hole for virtually the entire game after New York's Leon Washington returned the game's opening kickoff 86 yards for a touchdown. Clinton Portis' 196 rushing yards spearheaded the comeback effort.

The Best Time: It has to be that initial meeting in 1972. The Redskins came in having beaten its two biggest division rivals in Dallas and the Giants and were ripe for a letdown. Not only that, they had a jinx to deal with. Larry Brown was on the cover of the current edition of Sports Illustrated, with the headline declaring, "Washington is a #1 Power".

New York led 10-7 in the second quarter, the Jets having bested Kilmer's 45-yard touchdown bomb to Roy Jefferson with a one-yard scoring burst by John Riggins and a short field goal by Ian Howfield. It was then that the Redskins took control, scoring on offense with another Kilmer long ball, this one 70 yards to Charley Taylor, and Chris Hanburger's 41-yard return with an interception of Namath.

Washington turned it into a rout in the second half. Brown took a little screen pass from Kilmer and, with the help of a wicked downfield block by Taylor, turned it into a 89-yard touchdown play and ex-Jet Verlon Biggs returned a Namath fumble 16 yards to make the final 35-17.

The Worst Time: Less than two years the Redskins reached their pinnacle as a franchise, claiming their third championship in 10 years with a dominating win in Super Bowl XXVI, they played one of the worst games in their history in losing to the Jets 3-0. The Redskins mustered just 150 yards of offense.

The Skins' best chance of scoring was the result of a comic lowlight. The Jets were setting up for a field goal and snapped the ball early. The ball bounced off of holder Louis Agular's head. Johnny Thomas of the Redskins scooped it up, but kicker Cary Blanchard alertly made the tackle.

Odds and Ends

--As a member of the Jets, Keyshawn Johnson was involved in two very controversial plays in the end zone against the Redskins. One was in a 1996 game at RFK Stadium. In the fourth quarter, the 0-4 Jets were giving the 3-1 Redskins all they could handle. Trailing by eight, in the fourth quarter, Johnson appeared to have caught a touchdown pass, gaining control just before defender Tom Carter ripped the ball away. The ball ended up on the ground The officials huddled and it seemed that the only two possible calls were a Jets touchdown or an incomplete pass. The call turned out to be a Carter interception and the Redskins held on for the win.

In that 1999 game, Johnson caught a pass in the late going that was called a touchdown to pull the Jets within three of the Redskins. The replays appeared inconclusive, but the official ruled that Johnson had lost control before getting both feet down. New York had to settle for a field goal and Washington sealed the win after recovering the ensuing onside kick.

--That 1972 game at Shea Stadium was blacked out in Washington. No, it wasn't due to any arcane NFL policy, but because striking TV technicians cut the broadcast cables at Shea, making a telecast impossible.

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Paul Richardson's Redskins contract is team friendly early

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Paul Richardson's Redskins contract is team friendly early

The Redskins’ contract with wide receiver Paul Richardson is very team friendly in the first year but it increases over the years to the point where he needs to be a very productive receiver in order to justify staying on the roster.

The big picture of the deal is $40 million over five years. A total of $12.5 million is fully guaranteed at signing, which is comprised of a $10 million signing bonus, his $1.5 million 2018 salary, and $1 million of his $5 million 2019 salary.

More money will become guaranteed if Richardson is on the roster as of five days after the start of the league years in 2019 and 2020. The remaining $4 million of his 2019 salary and $3.5 million of his $6 million 2020 salary become guaranteed on those dates.


Richardson will get salaries of $7.5 million in 2021 and 2022. Each year of the contract he can earn $500,000 in per-game roster bonuses ($31,250 for each game he is on the 46-man game day roster).

It all adds up to the following salary cap numbers:

2018: $4 million
2019: $7.5 million
2020: $8.5 million
2021: $10 million
2022: $10 million

The average annual value of the contract is $8 million, which is tied for 24th among NFL receivers.

The first window the Redskins have to terminate Richardson’s contract without taking a negative cap hit would be in 2020 as long as they do it prior to the fifth day of the league year when the partial salary guarantee kicks in. They would take a $6 million deal cap hit but they would save a net of $2.5 million.

The last two years, when the cap numbers are at their highest, the Redskins could easily move on, saving $6 million in cap space in 2021 and $8 million in 2022.


Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.


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Need to Know: Redskins player quick hitters—Offensive starters

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Need to Know: Redskins player quick hitters—Offensive starters

Here is what you need to know on this Wednesday, March 21, 36 days before the NFL draft.  

Redskins starters quick hitters—offense

The last couple of days here I looked at how the depth charts are shaping up with a little bit of commentary (offense, defense). Today and tomorrow I’ll take a closer look at the starters with some quick hitters about each one, starting today with the offense.

QB Alex Smith—The deal is done, and the Redskins have their man for five years at $22.2 million per year or, if they prefer, three years at $23.7 million per. It seems like most fans are behind him but there will have to be a few more wins than losses this fall for that to become permanent.

RB Samaje Perine—He got better as the year went on, averaging nearly a half yard per carry more in the last seven games compared to the first nine. But the 3.4 average per carry certainly did not stop both Doug Williams and Jay Gruden from talking about drafting a running back early.

TE Jordan Reed—According to reports, he is rehabbing well from the hamstring and toe injuries that severely limited him last year. Still, expect him to be kept in bubble wrap until training camp and even then, his action may be limited.

WR Josh Doctson—Did Kirk Cousins look away from Doctson too often, lacking the confidence in him to let him go get the 50-50 balls? Will Smith have more confidence in Doctson? The answers to those questions may determine if the third-year receiver breaks out in 2018 or he continues to tease with flashes of ability.

WR Paul Richardson—He’s capable of the acrobatic catch, which should be fun to watch. Richardson was good with Russell Wilson on the off-schedule plays, maybe he can do the same with Smith.

WR Jamison Crowder—I guess it’s fair to say he had an off year in 2017 but his receiving yardage only dropped by 60 yards from 2016. It will be interesting to see if they keep him in as the punt returner after he averaged 6.3 yards per return (23rd of 25 qualifiers) last year.

LT Trent Williams—The six-time Pro Bowler is still in the relatively early stages of recovering from surgery to the knee that kept him from practicing from about Week 6 on. Don’t look for him until training camp and even then, the early workload is likely to be light.

LG Arie Kouandjio—This is the one offensive position that remains up in the air. Kouandjio has shown some grit as a spot starter but I don’t think the organization views him as a 16-game starter.

C Chase Roullier—Shortly after Roullier got the starting job when Spencer Long went out injured, Jay Gruden said that Roullier would be the Redskins’ center “for a long time”. There is no reason to doubt that at this point in time.

RG Brandon Scherff—His concern no longer is trying to live up to having been the fifth pick of the draft. Scherff has to play well enough to justify his 2019 option-year salary, which will be in the vicinity of $13 million.

RT Morgan Moses—He had surgery to repair his ankles, which were an issue most of last season. Still, he didn’t miss a start. Like Williams, even if he’s ready for training camp, don’t expect to see a whole lot of him.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.

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Days until:

—Offseason workouts begin (4/16) 27
—Training camp starts (approx. 7/26) 129
—2018 NFL season starts (9/9) 173

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