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Jansen returns—but is he back?

Jansen returns—but is he back?

In today's Richmond Times-Dispatch, there is a Paul Woody article about Washington Redskins tackle Jon Jansen. At the top, there is a four-column black and white picture of Jansen lying on the FedEx Field turf in agony right after a tangle in a pile resulted in him sustaining a broken leg and a dislocated ankle. His 2007 season ended less than 30 minutes after it started.

Woody's article talks about the two major injuries from which Jansen has had to recover since 2004, when a preseason Achilles tendon tear put him on the shelf for all of that season. Woody writes about Jansen's family life (he has two young daughters) and his offseason activities (he appeared on ESPN and wrote for The Sporting News).

He mentions the 2008 preseason only briefly, saying that "the Redskins' front five have been playing well in the preseason. They're protecting quarterback Jason Campbell and providing openings for the running game."

I'd have to say that the dean of Redskins beat writers is nine-tenths right here. All five starters have been doing well in run blocking, opening holes for whichever running back is handed the ball. Four of the five are doing a decent job of pass protection. The exception to the latter is Jon Jansen.

In the four series in which he has played, two in each of his team's games so far, Jansen has struggled in pass protection. He has wound up getting pushed back well into the backfield on several occasions. Against the Bills he was flagged for holding. In the Hall of Fame game a Colts defensive end not named Dwight Freeney pushed him around.

His problems have not been limited to the preseason games. Jansen has had some embarrassing moments in practice as well. Earlier this week Jason Taylor threw him to the ground as though Jansen were some sort of tackling dummy.

This has led to Jansen becoming a whipping boy on some message boards and blogs. He's too old and injury prone, they say. Jason Campbell won't survive September if they don't do something. Get rid of him and a kid like Chad Reinhardt or Stephon Heyer and chance.

To address the last part first, Jansen isn't going anywhere. He signed a contract extension prior to last season that would make releasing him very costly in terms of the 2009 salary cap.

Is he too old? No, 32 is not ancient for an offensive lineman by any means. Is he injury prone? Well, it's hard to argue that a player who has missed virtually all of two of the last four seasons is the picture of health. However, you also can make the case that the two injuries were the result of horribly bad luck, not of an inherent fragility in Jansen's physical makeup.

In any case, the Redskins are going to put him out there and see what happens. His struggles could be the result of him trying to knock of the rust that has accumulated as a result of missing last year. If that's the case, he should round into form by the time the season starts.

That brings up the question of what "form" for Jon Jansen is at this stage of his career. In his first few years in the league he was among the best tackles in the game with the Redskins' mediocre records costing him Pro Bowl spots. For the past few years, however, even when healthy, the general consensus is that he's been average at best.

Right now, Jansen has some work to do to get up to being average.

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Where does Stefon Diggs' remarkable catch rank among some of the best NFL playoff walk-offs?

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USA Today Sports/AP Images

Where does Stefon Diggs' remarkable catch rank among some of the best NFL playoff walk-offs?

There is nothing quite like January playoff football and Sunday night's Vikings vs. Saints game further proved this point.

In case you have been off the grid the past 12 hours, the Minnesota Vikings literally got a last second win against the New Orleans Saints.

With 10 seconds left in the fourth and facing a 3rd and 10, quarterback Case Keenum heaved the football near the sideline to wide receiver Stefon Diggs, who dodged two defenders while managing to stay inbounds for a 61-yard touchdown as the clock expired. 

It was one of the most remarkable playoff walk-off wins, if not the most remarkable one, in football.

So, where does it stand among the others?

RELATED: FORMER TERP PLAYS HERO IN VIKINGS' MIRACLE PLAYOFF WIN

Broncos vs. Steelers 2011 AFC Wild Card game: Remember Tim Tebow's 80-yard overtime touchdown to Demaryius Thomas during the 2011 Broncos vs. Steelers AFC Wild Card game? It was the first and last snap of overtime and it was wild.

Mile High Miracle: On third and three with 43 seconds left in the game, Ravens' Joe Flacco launched one towards wide receiver Jacoby Jones, who got in front of the Broncos receiver and ran the ball in for a 70-yard game-tying touchdown. The Ravens would eventually go on to win the game in double overtime. Some could argue it was the defining moment in the Ravens' Super Bowl run. 

Cardinals vs. Steelers Super Bowl XLIII: Under the brightest lights of all, Ben Roethlisberger found Santonio Holmes with 43 seconds in the fourth in the back of the end zone for a toe-dragging, Super Bowl-winning catch. 

RELATED: WHAT REDSKINS CAN LEARN FROM THIS WEEKEND'S PLAYOFF GAMES

Saints vs. 49ers 2012 NFC Divisional game: Sunday's loss wasn't the first time the Saints have experienced a fourth quarter letdown. Back in 2012, Alex Smith threw one to the endzone on 3rd-and-three with 14 seconds left that sealed a win.

While these are only a few, we can't wait to add more to the list in years to come.

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Redskins can't base Kirk Cousins decision on the makeup of the final four

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USA Today Sports Images

Redskins can't base Kirk Cousins decision on the makeup of the final four

For many fans who would like to see the Redskins move on from Kirk Cousins, the case was closed by the results of the divisional playoff round.

When the dust settled from the weekend, three of the four winning quarterbacks were Nick Foles, Blake Bortles, and Case Keenum. In Foles and Keenum, two journeymen who were free agents last March, available to any team that had a million bucks or so of salary cap space. Bortles was the third overall pick of the 2014 draft but he was widely viewed as a big-time bust.

MORE REDSKINS: WHAT CAN THE REDSKINS LEARN FROM THE PLAYOFFS?

So, to some the lesson was that you can roll any random quarterback out there and if you have some other pieces in place you can get to the final four.

Not so fast, my friend. Such thinking is based on a small sample size. This year is very much an outlier in terms of the quarterbacks who make the conference championship games. Let’s expand the sample size and look at the final four QBs standing in the previous six seasons.

2016: Matt Ryan, Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady, Ben Roethlisberger

2015: Cam Newton, Carson Palmer, Peyton Manning, Brady

2014: Russell Wilson, Rodgers, Brady, Andrew Luck

2013: Wilson, Colin Kaepernick, P. Manning, Brady

2012: Kaepernick, Ryan, Joe Flacco, Brady

2011: Brady, Flacco, Eli Manning, Alex Smith

There are 13 different quarterbacks here. Ten of those, Ryan, Rodgers, Brady, Roethlisberger, Newton, Palmer, Wilson, the two Mannings, and Luck, are true franchise type quarterbacks. Of those, five were first overall picks in the draft, Ryan was the third pick, and Roethlisberger was the 11th, and Rodgers went later in the first round. Only Wilson and Brady were late-round finds.

Of the three others, Smith (1st overall) and Flacco (18th) were first-round picks. Kaepernick was a high second-rounder.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerNBCS and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.

At the time of their playoff games, all of the 13 quarterbacks were on the teams that drafted them. None of them were looking for work the previous March, or at any time, for that matter.

As the Redskins decide if they should make a desperation attempt to retain Cousins or let him walk and start over at the most important position on the field, which data point should they consider? The most recent season in front of them, or the six prior years (and many more before that)?

Let’s say you’re looking to sell your house and you want to figure out a fair price. One comparable house down the street recently had sold for $200,000. But the previous six houses that sold in the last couple of months all went for around $300,000, Are you going to price your house based on the most recent sale? Or are you going to factor that in but pay much more attention to the six previous sales?

You have to step back and look at the larger sample size before using a particular set of facts as even a partial basis for a major decision with far-reaching ramifications.

With all that said, there are other factors at play besides what other teams have been able to accomplish. There are plenty of valid reasons for moving on from Cousins and those may outweigh the case for keeping him. But pointing to three quarterbacks on four teams and saying, “case closed” is way too simplistic an approach.

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