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More ticket rage

More ticket rage

First, I apologize for it taking some time for me to get some of the comments from the initial piece about the Redskins ticket issues posted. I'm on the road and I just can't get to them as fast as I'd like. The need for me to approve comments pertains to just the initial comment that each poster makes and, after that, they go up on the site immediately.

For the same reason, I haven't been able to respond to comments as quickly as I like to so I'm going to address some issues here in a separate post.

Was it wrong for the Redskins to sell tickets that should have gone to waiting list fans to brokers? Absolutely. Was Dan Snyder aware that it was going on? I doubt it. Is Snyder responsible for the high-pressure atmosphere that led to some salesmen breaking the rules to meet quotas? Absolutely.

And, on to the second article in the series, did the Redskins both create a major PR blunder and come down with too heavy a hand in some of their cases involving individuals holding premium seat contracts? Absolutely. Does that mean that they should let people out of signed contracts because they ask to be? Absolutely not. What's the purpose of a contract if it can unilaterally be cancelled? Should the Redskins offer tickets to those who have paid their judgments in full? Absolutely.

I posted a question to reporter James V. Grimaldi's chat yesterday and it didn't get answered. These two bits of information are crucial in judging the Redskins' actions. I asked them in my original post and one was partially answered, the other not addressed at all:

  • What do other NFL teams do in such situations? We did find out that nine said that they take no legal action when people default on premium ticket contracts and two said that they do. The other 18 either had no comment or did not respond. For such a well-researched piece, this was some pretty shoddy reporting. It would be simple enough, for example, to jump on line or get on the phone and see if any cases are pending or settled in Kansas City or in the city of Philadelphia. These cases are on the public record. The Post's failure to do this fuels my suspicion that they did not want to find anything that did not fit their agenda, a practice that I though was limited to just their political coverage.
  • Nobody interviewed a neutral lawyer to find out whether or not giving a pass to people who signed contracts would hinder the team's ability to go after corporations who default on million-dollar contracts? I don't know one way or the other. The failure of the Post to try to obtain some pretty basic information is fishy.

Again, the Redskins don't come out of this smelling like a rose. And while the Redskins did uncover the ticket bundling scheme on their own it's good that the Post got it out to the public as that will help ensure that something like that is unlikely to happen again.

But the Post clearly wanted a sensational story here. In the eyes of some, they got it.  I certainly hope that it makes people think twice, maybe three times, before committing thousands of dollars per year to club seats many years into the future. I do have to say that hhe front-page picture of the weeping fan on the Redskins-decorated couch was a bit over the top.

In the end, people who foam at the mouth at the mention of Dan Snyder's name have one more reason to do so. And the Post may have temporarily boosted its sagging subscription numbers. The Redskins will review their practices and maybe make some changes for the better.

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Redskins Fan of the Year bracket: Which Washington supporter deserves the title?

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Redskins Fan of the Year bracket: Which Washington supporter deserves the title?

Every week during the 2017 Redskins season, NBC Sports Washington found two Redskins fans in the crowd and paired them in a head-to-head matchup on Twitter to determine the fan of the game.

And now that the season is over, it's time to take each of those winners, throw them into a NCAA Tournament-style bracket and let Twitter pick the Redskins Fan of the Year.

Starting on January 8 over on the @NBCSRedskins Twitter account, one matchup a day will be posted at 11 a.m., and fans will have 24 hours to vote for their favorite supporter by retweeting or liking depending on their preference. Week 1's winner will face off with Week 17's, Week 2's will play Week 16's, etc.

The winners will advance, and eventually, one member of the Burgundy and Gold faithful will stand above all the rest, earning the coveted title of Redskins Fan of the Year. 

Check out the results below, which'll be updated every day. To see the tweet that corresponded with each matchup, click the link after the date, but remember, retweets and likes submitted after the 24-hour period won't be counted.

January 8: Round one, matchup one

This was a close one that came down to the last-minute, but at the 24-hour mark, Week 17's winner garnered justtttttttt enough retweets to move on.

January 9: Round one, matchup two

In this tournament, a giant Redskins chain is apparently worth more than a giant football hat.

January 10: Round one, matchup three

In the tournament's third showdown, we have our first winner from the Likes side:

January 11: Round one, matchup four

Was there anyway she wasn't gonna win, especially with the little Hogettes nose?

January 12: Round one, matchup five

Our fifth matchup's winner earned the most retweets of anyone up to this point:

January 15: Round one, matchup six

These three 'Skins fans had to witness Washington's Thursday night flop in Dallas, so it's only fair that they get to advance to the second round:

January 16: Round one, matchup seven

There's still time to vote on this one:

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Who will be the Redskins' core offensive players three years from now?

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Who will be the Redskins' core offensive players three years from now?

Just before training camp, I took a stab at figuring out who on the Redskins roster would still be with the team and contributing in the year 2020. Now that the season is over, let’s revisit that look, move it up to 2021, and see how much the picture has changed. The offense is up today, the defense later this week.

The terms used here are mostly self-explanatory. If you want details you can look at this post from a couple of years ago.   

Offense (age as of Week 1 2021)

Potential blue-chip players: Brandon Scherff (29), Morgan Moses (30)
Changes from last prediction: Moses added, removed Trent Williams (33), Jordan Reed (31)

Scherff and Moses both are two young players who should get better with more experience. The right side of the line will be in good hands assuming the Redskins will be able to re-sign Scherff, who will be a free agent following the 2019 season.

MORE REDSKINS: WHAT CAN THE REDSKINS LEARN FROM THE PLAYOFFS?

Williams will be 33 in 2021. He can play at a very high level at that age but I think he will be just below the perennial Pro Bowl status he enjoys now. Although I think that the Redskins can still get some good play out of Reed in the next couple of years, it’s hard to imagine him staying productive into his 30’s. He is under contract through 2021 but it’s hard to see him playing in Washington past 2020.

Solid starters: Jamison Crowder (28), Josh Doctson (27), Chris Thompson (30), Williams
Changes: Doctson, Thompson, Williams added, Kirk Cousins (33), Terrelle Pryor (32), Moses removed.

I’m probably higher on Doctson than most. I don’t see him attaining All-Pro status or catching 100 passes in a season but his physical talent is so good that he will be a solid, productive receiver for the next several years. The Redskins will need to find a third receiver but they will have two good ones in Crowder and Doctson.

Third-down back isn’t technically a starting position but Thompson should still be contributing as much to the offense as many starters.

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I think that Cousins will be a solid starter somewhere in 2021 but it is not looking like it will be in Washington. Pryor obviously did not work out and he is very likely to be playing elsewhere next year.

Potential starters: Spencer Long (30), Rob Kelley (28), Samaje Perine (25), Chase Roullier (28)
Changes: Added Roullier, moved Doctson up

Long could be a fixture on the O-line in 2021 or he could be signed by a different team in March. I don’t think that Kelley or Perine will be workhorse backs but either or both could be a part of a tandem. Roullier could move up to the “solid starters” category if he can repeat what he did in a small sample size (7 starts) in 2017.

There are other players who could end up on these lists a year from now. But we haven’t seen enough of 2017 draft picks TE Jeremy Sprinkle or WR Robert Davis to offer an intelligent assessment of where their careers are headed. It’s the same with undrafted linemen Tyler Catalina and Kyle Kalis. They might not make the team in 2018 or they could be competing for starting jobs in 2019.

There also are reserves like Ryan Grant (30) and Ty Nsekhe (35) who still could be on the roster but who would only be spot starters.

Stay up to date on the Redskins. Rich Tandler covers the team 365 days a year. Like his Facebook page Facebook.com/TandlerNBCS and follow him on Twitter @TandlerNBCS.